• <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, Chicago, 1968). <i>Collection of papers of John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, concerning the convention</i>. Various places, 1968.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (ARMSTRONG, NEIL.) VERNE, JULES. <i>A Trip to the Moon.</i> New York: F. M. Lupton, September 9, 1893. Signed by Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on the moon.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> KEY, FRANCIS SCOTT. <i>A Celebrated Patriotic Song, the Star Spangled Banner.</i> 1814.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> [COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER, Amerigo Vespucci ..] Bernardus Albingaunensis .. Dialogo nuperrime edito Genue in 1512.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (WATKINS, TABER &c.). <i>An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West Various places</i>, c. 1890s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (BATTLE OF CONCORD.) <i>Powder horn used by Minuteman Oliver Buttrick at the Battle of Concord</i>, April 19, 1775.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (CIVIL WAR.) <i>An Extraordinary Confederate Photograph and Autograph Album of Dr. R. L. C. White</i>, 125 original mounted salt prints. 1859-61.
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Normal Rockwell. Painting/Drawing Signed. Rockwell's "Barbeshop Quartet", 1936.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1782. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - March - 2010 Issue

What, Attention Age? Let's master Information first

Computer03-10

It's a new age.


By Tom McKinney

This month's AE Monthly is the first to include editorials by yours' truly, Thomas McKinney. Bruce is my dad. I'm not new to the company, but now I've been asked to voice my thoughts. My first was that, in many cases, it doesn't make sense for collectors to take part in traditional methods of acquiring material.

The Information Age has seen a drastic and important economic shift - on par with that brought about by the Industrial Revolution - based on a key commodity: information. The advent of the Internet along with the personal computer has allowed for instantaneous access of computer files by a virtually unlimited amount of people as long as they had a phone jack. Other technologies have built on this initial foundation, and some publications even say that the Information Age is giving way to a new era, the Attention Age.

Web 2.0 technologies and social networking's hold on the world is changing the way people use the Internet. While Google and search-based sites are still important, more and more people are participating in user-generated content: like Facebook/Myspace, blogs, wikis, and Twitter. They are participating with the content rather than browsing. And the way people are accessing the Internet is changing, too. Smart phone technology has caught the public's eye and now many (including myself) are spending more time viewing the web on a cellular phone screen than on a computer. Again, this changes the way people are using the Internet. Even on the best Internet smart phones, if you want to type a long email, or paper, what have you, nothing's going to beat an old-fashioned keyboard. One thing's for sure, the Internet, which 20 years ago was still dealing with growing pains, has evolved into something most people, and virtually all businesses, can't live without.

That most businesses can't live without the Internet is not news. This has been the case since the end of the 20th century and illustrated by the panic the Y2K bug caused. But, based on my outsider's perspective, it seems the rare book field as a whole has transitioned late to this digital Age. It makes sense, where do the words "rare" & "books" fit in with anything digital? It's an oxymoron, it might seem.

While the Attention Age is in full swing for young professionals and students, I believe mostly barriers in technological training & background, and to a lesser extent, physical issues have hindered this transition. You might say the evolution is really still beginning for the rare book world, while it seems to be culminating in the mainstream with the rise of Twitter and the smart phone.

Therefore, information and communication are where value lies in the Internet today for rare books. Based on my estimations, both these themes have had checkered and ambiguous pasts. Until databases and the Internet arrived, there was no easy way collectors could dream of perusing thousands, even millions of records of sales and bibliographical information. I have many memories of when I was younger, going with my father to various book collectors' shops, and we'd spend hours there. While I developed my ability to draw each of the four Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, my dad would spend his time talking to the particular dealer we were visiting, learning everything he could about the material he was interested in. Many times, my father left with well bargained for purchases, and other times, as hindsight has shown, he did not! This was all taking place in the early and mid-1990s. Other than the American Book Prices Current CD-ROM, and some hardcopies of various bibliographical sources (Sabin & Evans come to mind), dealers were the only people my father knew to get information about books.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Announcing the Fall 2016 Auction Season
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b> 19th & 20th Century Literature
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Colored Plate Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Printed & Manuscript Americana
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Art, Press & Illustrated Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b> Illustration Art
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 3:</b> Old Master Through Modern Prints
  • <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WARREN, JOSEPH. Letter Signed ("Jos Warren") as Chairman of the Committee of Safety. Cambridge, MA, June 4, 1775.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WHITMAN, WALT. Leaves of Grass. Brooklyn, NY: [for the Author], 1855.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> JEFFERSON, THOMAS. Printed Broadside Signed ("Th: Jefferson") as Secretary of State. Philadelphia, February 12, 1793.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> CELLINI, BENVENUTO. 1500-1571. Autograph Letter Signed ("Beto. Cellini"). [Florence, c.1566].
    <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> NAPOLEON BONAPARTE. Autograph Manuscript. [c.1795].
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> DICKENS, CHARLES. Great Expectations. London: Chapman and Hall, 1861.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> REED, JOHN. To the Honourable House of Representatives of the Freemen of Pennsylvania this Map of the City and Liberties of Phiadelphia With the Catalog of Purchasers is Humbly Dedicated.... [Philadelphia]: engraved by James Smit
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> ELIOT, THOMAS STEARNS. The Waste Land. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1922.

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