Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2009 Issue

Government Calls a Halt to Google Books Settlement

Govtbriefgoogle

The government files a brief opposing the Google Books settlement.


By Michael Stillman

The settlement between Google and groups representing authors and publishers that would allow the internet giant to make the text of out-of-print books available to the public has hit a snag. The settlement has had numerous opponents, including some authors and publishers, various European nations, Google competitors Microsoft, Yahoo and Amazon, certain library groups, and various others. Now add to that one more - the United States Federal Government. The Department of Justice filed an objection with the court just before the deadline of September 21. As a result, the Federal Court in New York hearing this case immediately postponed its final hearing scheduled for October 7. Instead, a status conference is planned for November 6, at which point the parties to the settlement are expected to have made changes needed to address the Department of Justice concerns.

The Open Book Alliance, a group of objectors formed to oppose the Google settlement, wasted no time in declaring the postponement a victory. "This has been seen by many as a clear victory for opponents to the settlement, as it acknowledges that even the parties involved recognize that the settlement, as it's currently written, is dead, and that any chance for revival requires making serious and fundamental changes," the Alliance posted on its website.

The settlement came out of a suit filed against Google by the Authors' Guild and Association of American Publishers. Google has been scanning millions of books from major libraries and making their digital copies available to the public through Google Books. They don't scan in-print books, and they have an unquestioned right to digitize books out of copyright, which includes anything published in America prior to 1923. However, Google had also been digitizing out-of-print books still under copyright protection. Normally the procedure would be to get permission of the copyright holder first. Unfortunately, many of these are so-called "orphan books," books legally under copyright, but the copyright holders cannot readily be found. They may be authors who died years ago, publishers that went out of business long ago. A requirement to first get their permission is tantamount to saying the book can never be digitized, its words unavailable to today's technology. So Google decided to scan first and ask questions later. The authors' and publishers' organizations sued on behalf of the copyright holders and agreed to a settlement whereby their parties would receive 63% of future sales, Google 37%.

This all sounds reasonable enough, but there are some problems. First of all, the government points out, this settlement becomes binding on all members of the "class" (copyright holders) unless those individuals opt out. However, many of those copyright holders aren't aware that their rights under copyright laws are being settled away, and the government does not believe an adequate attempt has been made to notify them. The Justice Department also expressed concerns that the rights of the unknown copyright holders are being represented by the known holders, whose interests may not be the same. Justice says that it "looks forward" to modifications to "minimize this conflict."

Justice's second objection involves potential antitrust issues. The first part of this issue is that prices are fixed through the 63%-37% formula and other factors such as to discourage price competition. The second part is that this settlement applies only to Google, and while it does not bar other would-be scanners from similar agreements, it requires they negotiate them lawfully. However, Google, to obtain this settlement, acted extra-lawfully, that is they violated copyright law by publishing these works, were sued, and then reached a settlement. The best others could hope to do is violate the law themselves and then reach a settlement after they were sued, which the settlement forbids. Additionally, the agreement provides that other scanners could not obtain a settlement with better terms than the one Google received, thereby prohibiting price negotiation.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> E.H. SHEPARD, Original drawing for A.A. Milne’s The House at Pooh Corner.<br>$40,000-60,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> BERNARD RATZER, Plan of the City of New York in North America, surveyed in the years 1766 & 1767. $80,000-100,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> THOMAS JEFFERSON, Autograph letter signed comparing Logan, Tecumseh, and Little Turtle to the Spartans. Monticello: 15 February 1821. $14,000-18,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN C. FREMONT, Narrative of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains, in the Year 1842.. Abridged edition, the only one containing the folding map From the Sporting Library of Arnold “Jake” Johnson. $3,000-5,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> ZANE GREY, Album containing 94 large format photographs of Grey and party at Catalina Island, Arizona, and fishing in the Pacific. From the Sporting Library of Arnold “Jake” Johnson. $5,000-$8,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> WILLIAM COMBE, A History of Madeira ... illustrative of the Costumes, Manners, and Occupations of the Inhabitants. produced by Ackermann in 1821; From the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> ERIC TAVERNER, Salmon Fishing... One of 275 copies signed by Taverner, published in 1931,From the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN WHITEHEAD, Exploration of Mount Kina Balu, North Borneo. Whitehead reached the high point of Kinabalu in 1888. Part of a major group of travel books from the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN LONG, Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader, describing the Manners and Customs of the North American Indians... The first edition of 1791. $3,000-$5,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> SAMUEL BECKETT, Stirrings Still. This, Beckett’s last work of fiction with original lithographs by Le Brocquy, limited to 200 copies signed by the author and the artist. From the Estate of Howard Kaminsky.. $1,500-$2,500
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Jacques-Émile Ruhlmann, wallpaper sample book, circa 1919. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Archive from a late office of the Breuer & Smith architectural team, New York, 1960-70s. $3,500 to $5,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> William Morris, <i>The Story of the Glittering Plain or the Land of Living Men,</i> illustrated by Walter Crane, Kelmscott Press, Hammersmith, 1894. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Gustave Doré, <i>La Sainte Bible selon la Vulgate,</i> Tours, 1866. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Gustav Klimt & Max Eisler, <i>Eine Nachlese,</i> complete set, Vienna, 1931. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>Eric Allatini & Gerda Wegener, <i>Sur Talons Rouges,</i> with original watercolor by Wegener, Paris, 1929. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>C.P. Cavafy, <i>Fourteen Poems,</i> illustrated & signed by David Hockney, London, 1966. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Jean Midolle, <i>Spécimen des Écritures Modernes...</i>, Strasbourg, 1834-35. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>E.A. Seguy, <i>Floréal: Dessins & Coloris Nouveaux,</i> Paris, 1925. $3,000 to $4,000.
  • <b>Bonhams: Results from Fine Books and Manuscripts on March 9, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> BEETHOVEN, LUDWIG VAN. Autograph Manuscript sketch-leaf part of the score of the Scottish Songs, "Sunset" Op. 108 no 2. [Vienna, February 1818]. Inscribed by Alexander Wheelock Thayer. SOLD for $131,250
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> Violin belonging to Albert Einstein, presented to him by Oscar H. Steger, 1933. SOLD for $516,500
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. Autograph Letter Signed ("Papa") to his son Hans Albert, discussing his involvement with the atomic bomb, September 2, 1945. SOLD for $106,250
    <b>Bonhams: Results from Fine Books and Manuscripts on March 9, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> HAMILTON, ALEXANDER. Autograph Letter Signed, to Baron von Steuben, with extensive notes of Von Steuben's aide Benjamin Walker, June 12, 1780. SOLD for $16,250
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in Latin, being detailed instructions on making the philosopher's stone. 8 pp. 1790s. SOLD for $275,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> 1869 Inauguration Bible of President Ulysses S. Grant. SOLD for $118,750

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