• <b>19th Century Shop.</b> CURTIS, EDWARD. <i>Original glass plate photograph, Honovi – Walpi Snake Priest, prepared by Curtis for the printing of The North American Indian</i>, c.1910
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN WEST.), Watkins, Taber, Savage, and others. <i>Magnificent Album of Mammoth Photographs of the American West, with other subjects various</i>, ca. 1865-1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>Darwin Family Photograph Album</i>. Down, Kent, 1871-1879
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (SECRET SERVICE). <i>The photographic archive, papers, and relics of William Kennoch, Secret Service Agent</i>. Various places, 1870s and 1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN REVOLUTION). <i>Daguerreotype Portrait of Baltus Stone, the earliest photo of a Revolution veteran,</i> 1846
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Friedrich Nietzsche, <i>Also Sprach Zarathustra</i>, Leipzig, 1908. Sold for $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk</i>, Vienna & Leipzig, 1918. Sold for $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Arthur Middleton, manuscript notes from Congress, Philadelphia, 1782. Sold for $55,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Joseph Smith, <i>The Book of Mormon</i>, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. Sold for $67,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b><br>L. Frank Baum, <i>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz</i>, first edition & issue, Chicago & New York, 1900. Sold for $23,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b> Mark Twain, <i>The Adventures of Tom Sawyer</i>, first American edition, Hartford, 1876. Sold for $13,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> George Washington, Partly-printed Document Signed as Commander-in-Chief, 1783. Sold for $13,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> Album with more than 130 Civil War-era signatures, including 18 presidents, 1864-2010. Sold for $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b><br>Sir Isaac Newton, <i>Opticks</i>, first edition & issue, London, 1704. Sold for $87,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> Euclid, <i>Elementa geometriae</i>, first edition, Venice, 1482. Sold for $62,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> William Shakespeare, <i>The Winters Tale</i>, first edition, London, 1623. Sold for $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 25:</b> Edward Ruscha, set of 14 first editions, 1963-78. Sold for $45,000.
  • <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. <i>Die Grundlage der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie.</i> Leipzig: Johann Ambrosius Barth, 1916.<br>$80,000 – 120,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in English, Signed Integrally ("Isaac Newton"). $50,000 – 70,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life</i>. London: John Murray, 1859. $25,000 – 35,000
    <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. <i>The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.</i> London: Benjamin Motte, 1729.<br>$20,000 – 30,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEISENBERG, WERNER. Autograph Manuscript entitled "<i>Entwicklung der Theorie der Elementarteilche,</i>” [1964].<br>$15,000 – 25,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> BERNOULLI, DANIEL. <i>Hydrodynamica, sive De viribus et motibus fluidorum commentarii.</i> Strasbourg: Johann Heinrich Decker for Johann Reinhold Dulsecker, 1738. $5,000 – 7,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> [TARKOVSKY, ANDREI ARSENIEVICH.] STRUGATSKY, BORIS AND ARKADY. Typed Manuscript for <i>Stalker</i>, being the director's working script, 1977. $150,000 – 200,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEMINGWAY, ERNEST. Typed Manuscript of "Marlin Off the Morro: A Cuban Letter," n.p., [1933]. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> SALINGER, JEROME DAVID. 4 Autograph Letters, 2 of which Signed ("Jerry") and 6 Typed Letters, 2 of which Initialed ("J"). $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> PASTERNAK, BORIS LEONIDOVICH. Typed Manuscript Carbon, "Doktor Zhivago," with some typed corrections, Moscow, 1948. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> MILNE, ALAN ALEXANDER. Autograph Manuscript Signed 3 times ("A.A. Milne"), entitled "Peace with Honour: An Enquiry into the War Convention," 1934.<br>$30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> FROST, ROBERT. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("Robert Frost"), titled "Gold for Christmas," 1952. $15,000 – 20,000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - May - 2007 Issue

Where Did Froogle Go?

Bgoogle

Google Product Search has replaced Froogle.


By Michael Stillman

If you have been searching for Froogle, Google's product search engine, recently you may have noticed something different. It isn't there. Gone. Vanished from the face of the Earth, or the face of Google anyway. Gone without a trace, almost.

Froogle is nowhere to be found unless you start digging around the bowels of the site, for example, the Google Blog. Here you will find that it has been unceremoniously replaced by a new, and very similar service, Google Product Search. If you are looking for Froogle, go to Google Product Search instead. From the Google home page, click on the "more" link just above the search box. That will bring you to six choices. Click "Products" and you are there – Google Product Search, almost like Froogle.

This switch is a sign of just how big and dominant Google has become. How many businesses would dare to change the name of a popular product and not bother to tell customers the new name or even where they can find it? Only an 800-pound gorilla can do that. Still, I can't fathom why there wasn't an unambiguous announcement, or why they removed the links to Froogle without first making it clear Froogle had morphed into Google Product Search.

As for the name change from the clever, rhyming "Froogle" to the pedestrian, boring "Google Product Search," Google has its reasons. In their blog, VP Marissa Mayer and Product Search Manager Jeff Bartelma state, "the name [Froogle] caused confusion for some because it doesn't clearly describe what the product does." That's a fair point, and the "Froogle" name certainly doesn't conform to Google's pattern for service names - boring but descriptive. It is a more logical choice, though I will miss this one bit of irreverence on Google's part when they picked the "Froogle" name. I hope they don't next rename the Google site "Search Engine."

So what has changed besides the name? In the blog, Mayer and Bartelma say, "We're taking the opportunity to refocus the user experience on providing the most comprehensive, relevant results in a clean, simple, easy-to-use UI." Do you know what that means? I think it means "we haven't done a thing," but I'm not sure. I don't speak this language very well. There probably will be changes in the days or years ahead, but for the moment, Google Product Search seems practically indistinguishable from Froogle to me. With one exception... At the top of the results, there is a little box that says "Show Google Checkout items only." If I were paranoid, that would scare the bejeezus out of me.

Google Checkout is Google's version of Pay Pal, a checkout system that any business can use to accept credit cards. It can be a useful tool for your business, or a distraction and unnecessary expense. It all depends on your situation. You decide whether you want to use it. At the moment, Google's offer to show only Google checkout items is a secondary choice for the consumer to make. Only after seeing all of the items listed in Product Search can you choose to see just Google Checkout items.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> CURTIS, EDWARD. <i>Original glass plate photograph, Honovi – Walpi Snake Priest, prepared by Curtis for the printing of The North American Indian</i>, c.1910
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN WEST.), Watkins, Taber, Savage, and others. <i>Magnificent Album of Mammoth Photographs of the American West, with other subjects various</i>, ca. 1865-1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>Darwin Family Photograph Album</i>. Down, Kent, 1871-1879
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (SECRET SERVICE). <i>The photographic archive, papers, and relics of William Kennoch, Secret Service Agent</i>. Various places, 1870s and 1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN REVOLUTION). <i>Daguerreotype Portrait of Baltus Stone, the earliest photo of a Revolution veteran,</i> 1846
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Friedrich Nietzsche, <i>Also Sprach Zarathustra</i>, Leipzig, 1908. Sold for $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk</i>, Vienna & Leipzig, 1918. Sold for $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Arthur Middleton, manuscript notes from Congress, Philadelphia, 1782. Sold for $55,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Joseph Smith, <i>The Book of Mormon</i>, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. Sold for $67,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b><br>L. Frank Baum, <i>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz</i>, first edition & issue, Chicago & New York, 1900. Sold for $23,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b> Mark Twain, <i>The Adventures of Tom Sawyer</i>, first American edition, Hartford, 1876. Sold for $13,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> George Washington, Partly-printed Document Signed as Commander-in-Chief, 1783. Sold for $13,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> Album with more than 130 Civil War-era signatures, including 18 presidents, 1864-2010. Sold for $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b><br>Sir Isaac Newton, <i>Opticks</i>, first edition & issue, London, 1704. Sold for $87,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> Euclid, <i>Elementa geometriae</i>, first edition, Venice, 1482. Sold for $62,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> William Shakespeare, <i>The Winters Tale</i>, first edition, London, 1623. Sold for $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 25:</b> Edward Ruscha, set of 14 first editions, 1963-78. Sold for $45,000.
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “America the Beautiful”
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington, Tongue-in-Cheek, Writes James McHenry About His Wife or Mistress—But Funding the Continental Army is the Real Topic
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Young’s Map of the United States
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> President Lincoln & His Most Profitable Client, the Illinois Central Railroad
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Thanks Former Pro-Slavery and Newly Republican Congressman for a Fiery Anti-Slavery Speech at a Philadelphia Campaign Rally
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “A Visit From St. Nicholas” - great association copy inscribed by Clement C. Moore
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Einstein Agrees to Allow “a Short Book on the Hydrogen Bomb” to Use His Statement Made on Eleanor Roosevelt’s TV Show
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The Building Blocks of Albert Einstein’s Creative Mind
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> A Unique Manuscript Map of Block Island Sound Including Fisher’s and Gardiner’s Islands, the Hamptons, and Montauk Point
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> J.R.R. Tolkien Writes his Proofreader with a Lengthy Discussion of the Lord of the Rings, Including Criticism of Radio Broadcasts of his Work
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Six Benjamin Franklin Signed Receipts – Including his Earliest Obtainable Autograph — Acknowledging a Donation to the Famous Library Company He Founded, and Five Payments for His Pennsylvania Gazette
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Sherman Dishes on Lincoln & Thomas, Meade, Sheridan, Halleck & Grant

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