Rare Book Monthly

Articles - June - 2006 Issue

Sex and Videotape at the Library

Clevelib

Unlike Las Vegas, what goes on in the library may not stay in the library.


By Michael Stillman

Everyone knows that stories about sex sell, or at least generate more readers, but when you write about antiquarian books, you rarely get opportunities for such easy success. Now, thanks to the good folks of Cleveland, I am finally getting my chance. Thank you, Cleveland.

There's more going on at the library than meets the eye. At least more than used to meet the eye. According to television station WKYC's website, cameras recently installed in the Cleveland library system to catch book theft have been picking up much more goings on. Not everyone who visits the library goes with the intention of filling some traditional function, such as reading, research, or even stealing books. No, not even the hallowed institution of the library is immune from the smut which has seeped into every nook and cranny of society. Not that it necessarily wasn't always so, it's just that we didn't use to have cameras to record it all.

Among the activities captured by library surveillance cameras, according to the station's report, were a man downloading and printing child pornography, teens having sex on a men's room sink, oral sex and masturbation. Then, there were the more staid crimes, like a patron being robbed at gunpoint.

Evidently, viewing online pornography is a fairly common event. Many libraries place no limitations on web surfing. In some cases, this takes place within a few feet of children, presumably using the library for more conventional purposes. While viewing pornography may be permissible, the head of library security stated that it is never appropriate to masturbate in the library while viewing it. Nevertheless, there apparently isn't any rule against it. Who would have thought to pass such a regulation?

The security chief noted that libraries basically like to leave people alone if they aren't causing a disturbance. I would tend to agree. I'd hate to have librarians hovering over me like car salesmen at an automobile dealership. I'd rather deal with teens making out in the stacks then librarians who act like used car salesmen. Besides which, having sex in the library is essentially a victimless crime, unless you consider the janitor who has to clean up after them a victim. Admittedly, this type of behavior should not go on in front of children, but the kids are all home playing videogames now anyway. They probably wouldn't know what to do in a library, at least not until their old enough to engage in sex.

The purpose in writing this article is not to make moral judgments. As pointed out earlier, it is primarily to increase readership. However, it is also intended to convey one piece of important, nonjudgmental advice. What you do in the library is not as secret and private as it once was, or as you may still think. The rash of book thefts, or slicing of maps and pages from valuable books, has forced librarians to install security cameras. The intention may be to pick up theft, but those cameras are not discriminating. They pick up everything. Whatever you do in there, someone may be watching, and whatever they see, may be captured on film forever, for the whole world to see. What you do may not be illegal, but it sure can be mighty embarrassing. If there is something you don't want your friends, neighbors, or mother to see you doing, don't do it in the library. This, unfortunately, applies to just about any public place now, not just libraries. Big Brother is watching, and he may not punish you, but he sure could humiliate you. Think about that the next time you plan to engage in sex in the library's restroom, or even pick your nose at the library for that matter.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>
  • <b>Bonhams: Exploration and Travel, Featuring Americana, Part I. September 25, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> Shackleton, Ernest. <i>Aurora Australis.</i> Printed at the sign of 'The Penguins'; East Antarctica, 1908. $70,000 to $100,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> Shackleton, Ernest. <i>South Polar Times.</i> 1st edition, limited issue. from the library of Michael Barne. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> General Washington's <i>Proceedings of a General Court Martial... of Major General Lee.</i> Philiadelphia, 1778. 100 copies printed for Congress. BOUND WITH: ...Court Martial... of St Clair and ...Schuyler. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Bonhams: Exploration and Travel, Featuring Americana, Part I. September 25, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> <i>The Voice of the People.</i> Boston, 1754. Rare pamphlet on the Excise Tax. Nathaniel Sparhawk's copy. $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> Autograph Letter Signed ("S.L. Clemens"), offering extensive hard-earned advice on writing, 5 pp, 1881. $30,000 to $50,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> After Fra Egnazio Danti. <i>L'Ultime Parti not:e nel Indie Occid:ntli" [The last known parts of the Western Indies].</i> Painted Map of California, Western Mexico, and Japan. $70,000 to $100,000
    <b>Bonhams: Exploration and Travel, Featuring Americana, Part I. September 25, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> Ptolemaeus, Claudius. <i>Geographie opus nouissima...</i> 1513. The most important edition of Ptolemy, containing the Admiral's Map. $250,000 to $350,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> De Arellano, Don Alonso. Manuscript, his <i>"Relación mui singular y circunstanciada... Capitán del Patax San Lucas,"</i> manuscript copy from the Sir Thomas Phillips collection. $50,000 to $80,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> Purchas, Samuel. <i>Purchas his Pilgrimes.</i> First edition. With John Simth's engraved map of Virginia. $70,000 to $100,000
    <b>Bonhams: Exploration and Travel, Featuring Americana, Part I. September 25, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> Lewis, Meriwether. Contemporary manuscript true copy of his final power of attorney, 1809. $8,000 to $12,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> <i>A New Method of Macarony Making, as Practiced at Boston in North America.</i> Mezzotint. London, 1774. $5,000 to $7,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 25:</b> <i>Scientific Base Ball Pitching: A Treatise on the Pitcher, Pitching, Origin and Philosophy of the Curve.</i> Chicago, 1897. $2,000 to $3,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> Franklin H. Brown, <i>State Sovereignty, National Union,</i> Chicago, 1860. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> Thomas Paine, <i>The American Crisis,</i> Fishkill, NY, December 1776. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b><br>The Aitken Bible, Philadelphia, 1781. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> Francisco Loubayssin de Lamarca, probable first edition of the first novel set in the Spanish New World, Paris, 1617. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> Juan de la Anunciación, <i>Sermonario en lengua mexicana,</i> first edition, first book of sermons in Nahuatl, Mexico, 1577. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> Maturino Gilberti, <i>Thesoro spiritual en lengua de Mechuacá,</i> first edition, Mexico, 1558. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> Commission of William O. Stoddard as secretary to the president, signed by Lincoln, Washington, 1861. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> <i>Clay and Frelinghuysen,</i> flag banner, circa 1844. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> Daguerreotype of a man believed to be Frederick Granger Williams Smith, son of Joseph Smith, circa late 1850s. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> John C. Wolfe, <i>Portrait of Abraham Lincoln,</i> oil on board in period wooden frame, circa 1860s. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> Francis W. Winton, manuscript on pow-wows with indigenous Canadians, 1881. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 27:</b> Family letters from two young daguerreotype artists, 1826-79. $10,000 to $15,000.

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