• <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29: Illustration Art</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Earl Moran, <i>Lady in the Light (Marilyn Monroe at Age 20),</i> oil, 1979.<br>$20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Man Ray, <i>La Femme Portative,</i> pen and ink, 1937. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Dr. Seuss, <i>Tadd and Todd,</i> ink and watercolor, published in Redbook, 1950. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29: Illustration Art</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Charles Addams, <i>Noisy Neighbor,</i> watercolor, ink & wash, for The New Yorker, 1951. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Gilbert Gaul, <i>Battle of New Orleans,</i> oil. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Rockwell Kent, <i>Rockwell / Alaska MCMXVIII,</i> pen and ink, frontispiece for <i>Wilderness,</i> 1970.<br>$7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29: Illustration Art</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Haddon Sundblom, <i>The Arrangement,</i> oil, published in Ladies' Home Journal, 1938. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Maurice Sendak, <i>Kiko’s Ferryboat,</i> pen, ink and watercolor, 1965. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Jack Kirby, <i>Captain America: The Rocks are Burning!,</i> ink over graphite, 1976. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29: Illustration Art</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Arnold Lobel, <i>Frog and Toad Building a Snowman,</i> pencil, 1976.<br>$4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Garth Williams, <i>Pet and Bunny,</i> pencil, for <i>Little House on the Prairie,</i> 1953. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b><br>Ludwig Bemelmans, <i>Does Chef Find the Pheasant Pleasant?,</i> watercolor and ink, circa 1950s.<br>$4,000 to $6,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, Chicago, 1968). <i>Collection of papers of John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, concerning the convention</i>. Various places, 1968.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (ARMSTRONG, NEIL.) VERNE, JULES. <i>A Trip to the Moon.</i> New York: F. M. Lupton, September 9, 1893. Signed by Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on the moon.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> KEY, FRANCIS SCOTT. <i>A Celebrated Patriotic Song, the Star Spangled Banner.</i> 1814.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> [COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER, Amerigo Vespucci ..] Bernardus Albingaunensis .. Dialogo nuperrime edito Genue in 1512.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (WATKINS, TABER &c.). <i>An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West Various places</i>, c. 1890s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (BATTLE OF CONCORD.) <i>Powder horn used by Minuteman Oliver Buttrick at the Battle of Concord</i>, April 19, 1775.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (CIVIL WAR.) <i>An Extraordinary Confederate Photograph and Autograph Album of Dr. R. L. C. White</i>, 125 original mounted salt prints. 1859-61.
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Normal Rockwell. Painting/Drawing Signed. Rockwell's "Barbeshop Quartet", 1936.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1782. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.
  • <b>Sotheby’s Paris: The Hunting Library of the Counts du Verne. 5 October.</b> The Largest Collection of Hunting and Falconry To Appear on the Market for the Last Thirty Years.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris Oct. 5:</b> Jacques du Fouilloux. <i>La Vénerie</i>. Poitiers, 1561. Est. €100.000 – 150.000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris Oct. 5:</b> Gaston Phébus. <i>Déduits de la chasse des bestes sauvaiges et des oyseaux de proye</i>. Paris, circa 1507. Est. €150.000 – 200.000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris Oct. 5:</b> Pierre et François de Gommer. <i>L’Autoursserie</i>. Chaalons, 1594. Est. €30.000 – 50.000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris: The Hunting Library of the Counts du Verne. 5 October. The Largest Collection of Hunting and Falconry To Appear on the Market for the Last Thirty Years.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris Oct. 5:</b> Pierre Landry. <i>Quatre scènes de chasse à courre.</i> Paris, circa 1680. Est. €2.000 – 3.000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris Oct. 5:</b> Conte Henri de Vibraye - Baron Karl Reille. <i>La chasse à courre.</i> Paris, 1951. Est. €3.000 – 5.000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris Oct. 5:</b> Duc de Brissac - Paul Jouve. <i>Chasse.</i> Paris, 1956. Est. €30.000 – 50.000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - July - 2014 Issue

Did the Police Chief Just Put Down Books?

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A safe place to stash your books (from the SFMTA website).

Did San Francisco's Police Chief just “diss” books? We aren't sure what to make of a comment he recently made. Surely, there's another explanation. From everything we know, Chief Greg Suhr is a fine man, an outstanding yet fair law enforcement officer, and loves puppies too. But books?

 

Last spring, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, operator of the city's Municipal Railway (Muni) and buses, announced a program to cut crime on its cars. Its program, in conjunction with the San Francisco Police Department, put more officers on them. The officers were there to stop crime and arrest offenders if necessary, but their primary value was as a deterrent. Thieves tend to be a little more reluctant to steal things when there's a uniformed officer watching them.

 

The major target of these thieves has been smart phones and other mobile devices. Evidently, these things must be easy to sell for a good price. The result was Muni named its project “Eyes Up, Phones Down.” Put that phone away and watch what the guy next to you is doing. Like freedom, the price of a cell phone is eternal vigilance.

 

“Eyes Up, Phones Down” has proven to be a great success. Muni reports that crime on the railway has decreased 30%, and cell phone thefts have declined by a whopping 77%. Mayor Edwin M. Lee announced, “We are reducing crime and increasing security on Muni so riders feel safe moving around our city.” He then went on to point out, “While enforcement is key, we need to take every opportunity to remind riders to be aware of their surroundings and help prevent crimes of opportunity - particularly in cases where thieves are targeting electronic devices.”

 

Chief Suhr went on to elaborate on this point. “We can be even more successful if riders would be more aware of their surroundings when using electronic devices. Maybe read a book while on Muni and wait to use your electronic device. We have no issues and/or concerns with book theft on Muni.”

 

No issues with thieves stealing books? Not even a little bit concerned? Doesn't anybody want books anymore? Is the issue that they are of such little value that losing one isn't worth the effort, sort of like someone stealing a stick of gum from your purse? Here's a piece of advice for the unwary – don't carry a copy of the Gutenberg Bible on a San Francisco city bus. The police are unconcerned.

 

Why is it thieves don't want books? I've thought carefully about this one and reached the following conclusion. It must be that they do not know what they are used for. Everyone knows the purpose of a smart phone, but a book...? What is this strange technology? So, here's some more advice. The next time you take a San Francisco train or bus, bring along a book. It will keep the thieves away. And, if you hollow it out, it makes a safe place to hide your cell phone.


Posted On: 2014-07-04 18:03
User Name: MiRIAMGREEN

As a former curator the Yale Med Hist Collections during the 80s, always found that ignorance was the best defense.


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, Chicago, 1968). <i>Collection of papers of John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, concerning the convention</i>. Various places, 1968.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (ARMSTRONG, NEIL.) VERNE, JULES. <i>A Trip to the Moon.</i> New York: F. M. Lupton, September 9, 1893. Signed by Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on the moon.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> KEY, FRANCIS SCOTT. <i>A Celebrated Patriotic Song, the Star Spangled Banner.</i> 1814.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> [COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER, Amerigo Vespucci ..] Bernardus Albingaunensis .. Dialogo nuperrime edito Genue in 1512.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (WATKINS, TABER &c.). <i>An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West Various places</i>, c. 1890s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (BATTLE OF CONCORD.) <i>Powder horn used by Minuteman Oliver Buttrick at the Battle of Concord</i>, April 19, 1775.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (CIVIL WAR.) <i>An Extraordinary Confederate Photograph and Autograph Album of Dr. R. L. C. White</i>, 125 original mounted salt prints. 1859-61.
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Normal Rockwell. Painting/Drawing Signed. Rockwell's "Barbeshop Quartet", 1936.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1782. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.

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