Rare Book Monthly

Articles - March - 2014 Issue

Recent Book and Paper Fairs in California

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The Book Bin at Pasadena was busy selling the unexpected

Book Fairs on the West Coast

 

Recently, on February 1st and 2nd there was a book and ephemera fair in San Francisco at Fort Mason, on the water on the north side of the city.  The weather was cold and rainy and deterred some no doubt from attending the two-day event.  The following weekend the ABAA held its premier west coast show of 2014 over 3 days at Pasadena at the well-lighted and spacious convention center.  Both fairs would attract portions of the same audience but end up being very different events.

 

The San Francisco fair, organized for the second time by Nancy Johnson of Nancy Johnson Events Management LLC, was open to anyone interested to exhibit.  If you could pay the exposition fee and the additional cost for sundries you were in.  In Pasadena only ILAB and ABAA members could participate in the better-known and more widely publicized fair that set back exhibitors double what the San Francisco fair cost.   This set up a sartorial comparison, the San Francisco more blue jeans than designer jeans, the Pasadena fair suits with discrete designer labels. 

 

Many exhibitors in San Francisco are frequent exhibitors at weekend events.  In some cases they do a fair a month and offer not only different items but also different categories such as postcards, objects and antiques.  For them books is one of the inventories they sell and they don’t bring them to every show.  Generally they and the other exhibitors did better with ephemera - in part because the sweet spot in the busy booths was $50 to $200 and that price range better suited to ephemera.  More expensive material sold but the crowds were in the perceived bargain categories. 

 

This is not to suggest that the top of the line wasn’t represented and exhibiting.  The William Reese Company brought a fair approximation of a premier and extensive library, of course to sell books but also to convey the stature of the material they handle.  Bauman Rare Books was also there as were Peter Harrington and Donald Heald, Maggs Brothers, John Windle and Phillip J. Pirages to name only a few.  The list of serious booksellers exhibiting was long.  But so too were the dealers measuring their successes in ephemera, postcards and comics and at the end of the weekend it appears the less expensive material, post cards and comic books were where buyer interest focused.  

 

David Lilburne of Antipodean Books, Maps and Prints summed it up very well.  “I’ll suggest to the Ephemera Society they hold a fair here.  Their members will do very well.”  San Francisco, for this weekend, was simply more interested in paper than books.

 

Over the next weekend many of the same dealers moved on to Pasadena.

 

The Pasadena fair was quite different, the venue, the Pasadena Convention Center, simply a marvelous setting.  Well lit, spacious, and adorned with creature comforts such as carpeting and conversation areas I suspect everyone liked the facilities.  So what if the show cost roughly double what the San Francisco fair cost, it turned out the difference was inconsequential to the calculus of exhibitor finances; $3,000 versus $1,500 [including counters, partitions, and additional lighting].   Add in the much better weather in Pasadena and the Rose Bowl city won the comparison in a romp.

 

Dan Whitmore, of Whitmore Rare Books, who did both the SF Fair and the Pasadena event said, “I did well enough at both but if forced to choose one over the other I’d choose the ABAA fair at Pasadena.  The more pleasant environment easily offset the higher costs.  We are all in the business of building rapport and the ambiance was terrific.”  It didn’t help he had to sidestep occasional drips from a leaky ceiling in San Francisco.

 

So Pasadena won hands down except for one factor:  sales.  In neither location were sales exceptional but San Francisco, because they opened their doors to independent exhibitors, had more eclectic less expensive material and plenty of cost aware browsers, probably was better as a mechanism for encouraging new collectors. Though there could have been more, those who came spent more of their time and most of their money in the booths that were stocked with less expensive possibilities and sent almost everyone who showcased such material home happy.  

 

And what does this suggest?  Less expensive paper collectibles did well at both fairs although San Francisco offered more opportunities and somewhat lower prices.  And these sales did something else.  They provided a ramp up to the more complex collecting that top-tier dealers make a career of defining, explaining and selling.  In other words, as has been suggested before, we have to first engage the nascent collector and then over time educate them to the possibilities of collecting seriously.  Seen in this light the San Francisco fair was particularly effective.

 

Duncan McLaren of Lord Dunham Rare Books who has exhibited at both types of fairs, feels the greater opportunity to engage new collectors is at the independent fairs where there is not a long line of serious booksellers.  McLaren is exhibiting this year at more antique shows based on his 2013 experiences.  “Many of the items we are handling are physical historical artifacts and they are fresh in the antiques market.” 

 

The two sides of the same coin, the serious rare books and the entry level comics and ephemera very visible in San Francisco and somewhat visible in Pasadena, actually set very well together, permitting the newbie to buy inexpensive material today while casting an eye on what and from whom they could hope to be buying in the years ahead.  I found the differences compelling – almost a visual primer of what collecting can become through time.  For conveying this impression both fairs deserve praise.

 

As to next year when the ABAA-ILAB fair returns to the Bay Area, the decision has already been taken on a 4 to 3 vote to have the 2015 fair in Oakland, just across the Bay Bridge from San Francisco.  About this decision I asked many people how they felt and their enthusiasm was lukewarm.  The net of everything I heard was “the ABAA councils have made good decisions before, they will make a good decision this time.”  And it should work out subject to two caveats:

 

That the change in venue is widely advertised and well explained.  The lack of the clarity about this year’s San Francisco Book and Ephemera Show’s move to Fort Mason led the news to get lost in the weeds and it affected attendance.

 

That the currently every other year SFB&E fair does not step into the gap created by the ABAA’s move across the Oakland Bay Bridge to Oakland, and take over Fort Mason to run their event in direct competition with the ABAA fair.  Many exhibitors would prefer to stay in San Francisco.  Set up as an ephemera and book fair [emphasis ephemera] that show should do very well.  It will help of course if the weather is better, the roof not leaking and if aisle carpets soften the concrete floor.  Running simultaneously the two fairs would create a mega weekend event but probably diminish support for the move to Oakland even as the combined event becomes the largest collectible paper event in the world.

 

Whatever the outcome the fairs are always interesting.  I bought one book and an archive of Hudson valley material at the SF fair and purchased, in Pasadena, a Fishkill broadside and made notes to consider another possible purchase.

 

Such events are always worthwhile.

 

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>
  • <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>The Tragedie of Julius Caesar.</i> London, 1623. 1st appearance in print, Complete from the First Folio. Sold for $175,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Ernst, Max. <i>Mr. Knife and Miss Fork</i>. Paris, 1932. DELUXE EDITION. Sold for $15,625
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Cage, John. Autograph musical leaf from his Concert for Piano and Orchestra, NY, 1958. Sold for $18,750
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Einstein, Albert. Signed Passport Photo for his US citizenship application. Bermuda, 1935. Sold for $17,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Verard, Antoine. Illuminated printed Book of Hours. Paris, 1507. Sold for $7,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Wetterkurzschlussel. German Weather Report Codebook - for Enigma use. Berlin, 1942. Sold for $225,000
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Morelos y Pavon, Jose Maria. Autograph letter signed to El Virrey Venegas, February 5, 1812. Sold for $6,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Milne, A.A. Complete set of <i>Winnie-the-Pooh</i> books. 4 volumes. All first issue points. London, 1924-1928. Sold for $5,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> A 48-star American Flag, battle worn flown at Guadalcanal and Peleliu, 1942-1944. Sold for $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Locke, John. Autograph Letter Signed mourning the death of his friend, William Molyneaux, 2 pp, October 27, 1698. Sold for $20,000
  • <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Zane Grey, Inscribed photograph album depicting Grey and party at Catalina, fishing, and in Arizona. $700 to $1,000
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Eric Taverner, Salmon Fishing...London: Seeley, Service & Co., 1931. $600 to $900
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> The Gentleman Angler. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Ken Robinson, Flyfishers' Progress. [London: The Flyfishers' Club, 2000. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> G. H. Lacy, North Punjab Fishing Club Angler's Handbook. Calcutta: Newman & Co., 1890. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> J. Harrington Keene, Fly-Fishing and Fly-Making for Trout, etc. New York, 1887. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Arthur Macrate, The History of The Tuna Club, Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, California, 1948. $400 to $600
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Joseph D. Bates Jr. Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing. Harrisburg, PA: The Stackpole Company, 1966. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Paul Schmookler and Ingrid V. Sils. Rare and Unusual Fly Tying Materials: A Natural History. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Herbert Hoover, Fishing For Fun - And To Wash Your Soul. New York: Random House, 1963. $400 to $600
  • <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 372: Martin Luther King Jr. March for Freedom Now! Placard. Chicago, 1960. 28 x 22”. $3,000 to $6,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 567: Warhol, Andy. Tate Gallery Exhibition Booklet, Signed on the Cover by Warhol. Tate Gallery, 1971. $700 to $900
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 72: Mitchell, Margaret. <i>Gone With the Wind.</i> New York: The Macmillan Co., 1936. First edition, first issue. $4,000 to $5,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 468: Photo Archive Documenting the 1930s—50s Chicago Jazz and Night Club Scene. A significant collection. $2,000 to $4,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 143: Dr. Seuss. <i>Oh Say Can You Say.</i> 1979, First Edition, Signed. $200 to $300
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 285: [Maps] Thomas G. Bradford. <i>A Comprehensive Atlas, Geographical, Historical & Commercial.</i> Boston: William D. Ticknor, 1835. First Edition. $1,600 to $1,800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 69: Herman Melville. <i>Moby Dick, or The Whale</i>. New York: Random House, 1930. First Kent Trade Edition. $400 to $600
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 295: John James Audoban. Group of 148 Lithographs from the Birds of America. Philadelphia: J.T. Bowen, ca. 1840s. $600 to $800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 54: Langston Hughes. <i>One-Way Ticket.</i> New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1949. First edition. $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 7: Ray Bradbury. <i>The Martian Chronicles.</i> With a Wine Label Signed by Bradbury. Garden City: Doubleday, 1950. First edition $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 121. Frank L Baum. <i>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.</i> Chicago: George M. Hill Co., 1899, 1900. First Edition. $4,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 369. [Declaration of Independence] Peter Force Engraving of the Declaration of Independence. One page; 29 x 26”. From the "American Archives" 1837-1853 series of books. $15,000 to $20,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Luis de Lucena, <i>Arte de Ajedres,</i> first edition of the earliest extant manual on modern chess, Salamanca, circa 1496-97. Sold for $68,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Carte-de-visite album with 83 images of prominent African Americans & abolitionists, circa 1860s. Sold for $47,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> Vienna & Leipzig, 1918. Sold for $106,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Man Ray, <i>[London Transport] – Keeps London Going,</i> 1938. Sold for $149,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Thomas Jefferson, Letter Signed, to Major-General Nathanael Greene, promising reinforcements against Cornwallis, 1781. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Nicolas de Fer, <i>L’Amerique Divisee Selon Letendue de ses Principales Parties,</i> Paris, 1713. Sold for $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Russell H. Tandy, <i>The Secret in the Old Attic,</i> watercolor, pencil & ink, 1944. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ernest Hemingway, <i>Three Stories & Ten Poems,</i> first edition of the author's first book, Paris, 1923. Sold for $23,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Walker Evans, <i>River Rouge Plant,</i> silver print, 1947. Sold for $57,500.

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