• <b><center>Gonnelli Auction House<br>Books, Autographs & Manuscripts<br>11th-12th of October 2022
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Alfieri Vittorio, <i>Vita [...] scritta da esso,</i> 1968. Starting Price: €900,00.
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Collection of 25 albumin photographs depicting Italian, French and Swiss places. Late 19th century.
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Brandolini D’Adda Brandolino, Duale. <i>Poesia [...] e incisioni di Sandro Martini,</i> 1976.
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Alighieri Dante, <i>La divina commedia di Dante</i> edizione illustrata da 30 fotografie tolte da disegni di Scaramuzza, 1879. Starting Price: €500,00.
    Gonnelli Oct. 12th: Cervantes Saavedra Miguel (de), <i>El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha.</i> Nueva edicion corregida por la Real Academia Española, 1780. Starting price: €12.000,00.
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Collodi Carlo, <i>Le avventure di Pinocchio. Storia di un burattino,</i> 1883. Starting price: €6.000,00.
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> Wilde Oscar, <i>The Picture of Dorian Gray [...]</i> with original images & notes on the text by Jim Dine, 1968. Starting price: €1.500,00
    <b>Gonnelli Oct. 11th:</b> The smallest tarot cards in the world. 21st century.
  • <b><center>Sotheby’s<br>Antiquarian Books<br>Including a series of views of Milan<br>September 27 to October 4</b></center>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Livius, Historia Romanae decades, Venice, Vindelinus de Spira, 1470, contemporary Morocco. €30,000 to €40,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Blaeu, Nieuw Stedeboeck van Italien (Piemont), The Hague, 1724-1725, 8 volumes, marbled calf gilt. €70,000 to €90,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Baysio, Rosarium decretorum, Venice, 1481, later vellum. €10,000 to €15,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> [Niccolò da Poggibonsi], Viaggio da Venetia al santo Sepulchro, Venice, 1529, later half calf. €2,000 to €3,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Sep. 27 – Oct. 4:</b> Hieronymus, Epistole [Italian], Ferrara, 1497, blue crushed morocco with the Rocco di Torrepadula arms. €12,000 to €15,000.
  • <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Printed & Manuscript Americana<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Extensive archive of papers of Lincoln’s Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> George Catlin, <i>North American Indian Portfolio,</i> 1844. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> The Twenty-Four Books of the Holy Scriptures, Carefully Translated…after the Best Jewish Authorities, Philadelphia, 1853-54. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Printed & Manuscript Americana<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Wedding book of Eleanor Roosevelt’s bodyguard, Earl Miller, signed by the Roosevelts, 1932. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Textile titled <i>The Resignation of Pres’t Washington,</i> Scotland, circa 1800. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Gideon Welles, Pass for President Lincoln’s White House funeral, 1865. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Confirmation of arms and nobility in favor of the Diez y Mora family, Madrid, 1710. $2,500 to $3,500.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - October - 2016 Issue

Ranching from Dorothy Sloan Rare Books

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Ranching from Dorothy Sloan.

Dorothy Sloan Rare Books of Austin, Texas, has issued a massive catalogue entitled Ranching. It contains almost 1,000 books related to the field. Actually, this is hardly all in the collection, as it is Catalogue Ten, Part Four, Volume Three H-L. This is the third volume on ranching, covering only a small part of the alphabet, and it still manages to offer almost 1,000 items. This is a thorough collection.

 

It should be noted that the focus is ranching in the American West. Ranching takes place in the East and South and North, and in many other countries as well, but ranching plays a deeper role in the life of the West, and is certainly more part of a romantic history in that part of the nation.

 

Sloan notes that cattle raising precedes the colonization of America. It took place in Europe and Africa long before. However, ranching requires a lot of land. As agricultural and industrial uses that required less land, and consequently were more productive per acre, arose, ranching was pushed more and more to the outskirts of society. That would come to be America in particular for the English. From colonial times up to the Civil War, ranching was conducted mostly in the South and East, and then in what was still referred to as the "West," but today is more Midwest or South, still east of the Mississippi River. Finally, with the end of the war and the rapid rise of settlement of the lands west of the Mississippi, the raising of cattle moved to the West. There was much land available. As farms took over the more fertile areas, cattle raising moved even farther west, much to the more barren areas such as West Texas. It wasn't suitable for agriculture, but still had enough plant life for cattle to forage.

 

This began the romantic era of ranching. Cattle raisers branded their cows and let them run free over the great open spaces. No one owned the land; it was available to all. Cattle would be fattened off the land as much as possible and then driven hundreds of miles across open prairies to railroad stops where they could be shipped to consumers to the east. As Sloan points out, the era lasted only about twenty years. Ranchers in the Northeast were more scientific, using feedlots, fencing in their land for their own exclusive use. They were the descendants of southern England, where land was less available. Southern ranchers were the descendants of the Scotch-Irish, who had raised their cattle on open land, a practice they continued in America. The two came into conflict in the West. The wealthier, established ranchers wanted to fence off land for their own use, the smaller and less wealthy ranchers wanted the open spaces, where cowboys could feed, herd and drive their cattle across the land. Money talks. The government, not surprisingly, sided with the wealthy and powerful. By the latter part of the 19th century, the land was fenced off, and the romantic era of cattle drives was over. Ranching became a big business, with some ranches achieving enormous size. The old-time cowboys, and all that the trade attracted – gunslingers, western movie style lawmen, hanging judges, and the Old West that we imagine came to an end.

 

These books describe both eras of ranching. They also cover much more, particularly from the Old West period. You will find books about the outlaws and sheriffs and all you would expect from the time, but they will also in part describe ranching. The two were too closely tied together not to. Here are just a few samples of what will be found in this enormous selection of books.

 

We begin with a book that brings us back to the early days of western ranching. Item 2734 is The Trail Drivers of Texas: Interesting Sketches of Early Cowboys and Their Experiences on the Range and on the Trail During the Days that Tried Men's Souls, edited by J. Marvin Hunter. It includes both volumes, published in 1920 and 1923. Much of the work compiling these stories was done by George Saunders, President of the Old Time Trail Drivers' Association. Saunders founded the organization in 1915 and set about gathering the accounts of those who participated in these drives between the end of the Civil War and the late 19th century. For many, the excitement and danger of the drives that took them from Texas to Kansas behind a herd of cattle were the high points of their lives. Of course, there were differences in their exact memories, these stories being reminiscences of old men many years after they rode the range. Nonetheless, there is no better book for a feel of what cattle drives were like in the golden age of the open range. Adams describes this book as, "perhaps the most important single contribution to the history of cattle driving on the western trails." Priced at $600.

 

Saunders insisted most cowboys were good men, no more criminals among them than in any other profession. Here is one of the bad seeds. I. P. Olive (Isom Prentice "Print" Olive) emerged from the Civil War a hardened man. At the time, there were many longhorn running loose in the chaos of the war, and Olive was one who rounded them up and took them to market in Kansas. There were many rustlers as well, of which he might be considered one, but Olive was not about to tolerate anyone taking his cattle. His response was not to tell the Sheriff or take people he believed were stealing his cows to court. Rather, it was to shoot them. He did this many times. Finally, he concluded it was time to leave Texas and moved to Nebraska. He became a successful rancher, but his habits towards rustlers, and settlers he felt were invading his "private" land (actually, government land) did not change. That brings us to the next book, Olive's Last Round-Up, by A. O. Jenkins, circa 1930. It concerns an incident with settlers Luther Mitchell and Ami Ketchum. Olive's brother Bob paid them a visit, but evidently it was not a friendly encounter. Bob ended up dead. "Print" returned the favor. He always claimed he never killed anyone who didn't deserved dying, but not everyone shared that point of view. Olive would be on the move again, eventually ending up in Colorado, where one day, entering a saloon unarmed, he encountered a man with a grudge against him. Olive, then age 46 (the year was 1886), finally found himself on the wrong end of a gun. Item 2846. $300.

 

Charles Goodnight started along a similar path as I. P. Olive, but his trail led to a very different conclusion. Like Olive, a Confederate veteran of the Civil War, he too participated in the round-up of escaped cattle in Texas after the war, driving them from West Texas to New Mexico. However, he also became a respectable member of his community, eventually settling down to operate a huge ranch in the Texas panhandle, where he built an enormous herd of cattle. He helped to preserve the buffalo, was first to breed "cattalo" (also called "beefalo"), a crossbreed that didn't work out as well as hoped. He established a college for the children of ranchers and later had a town named for him. He wasn't perfect, and apparently approved of some extrajudicial justice for rustlers, but for the most part was highly respected. Many regard him as the most important rancher Texas ever produced. He was also one of the longest living. After his first wife died, he married a distant relative who was also his nurse at the age of 91. She was 26. Two years later, she inherited when he died in 1929, long into the modern ranching era. Item 2326 is his biography, Charles Goodnight: Cowman and Plainsman, by J. Evetts Haley, published in 1936. $850.

 

There is no more famous rancher than this man, though his fame is attributable more to other ventures. Theodore Roosevelt was a young man when he went on a hunting trip to the Dakota Territory in 1883. He purchased a ranch, but had no intention of staying. The following year, he was struck with an unimaginable tragedy. Both his wife and mother died on Valentine's Day 1884. He needed to get away. Roosevelt headed back to Dakota, purchased another ranch, and stayed until a bad winter and political callings pulled him back to New York. Nevertheless, his time on the ranch was very important to the values Roosevelt developed. His role as one of America's great conservationists was formed during his time operating a ranch in the distant hinterlands. Item 2309 is Roosevelt in the Badlands, by Hermann Hagedorn, published in 1921. It is a close look at this formative time in Roosevelt's life. $75.

 

Dorothy Sloan Rare Books may be reached at 512-477-8442 or rarebooks@sloanrarebooks.com. Their website is www.sloanrarebooks.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> JOYCE, James. <i>Ulysses.</i> London: John Lane the Bodley Head, 1937. PRESENTATION COPY OF THE FIRST ENGLISH EDITION PRINTED IN ENGLAND. $50,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [SHACKLETON, Ernest]. –– BROWNING, Robert. <i>Poetical Works of…</i> London: Smith and Elder, 1906. PRESENTED TO SHACKLETON AND THE OFFICERS OF THE NIMROD BY A MEMBER OF THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> AUDUBON, John James. <i>The Birds of America, from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> New York: George R. Lockwood, [1870]. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> ARISTOTLE. Opera, in Greek, parts one and two only: Organon and Natural Philosophy I. Edited by Aldus and others. Venice: Aldus Manutius, 1 November 1495–February 1498. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> COOK, James, Capt. [Collected Voyages]. First and Second Voyages: London: W. Strahan; and T. Cadell, 1773, 1777; Third Voyage: London: H. Hughes for G. Nicol and T. Cadell, 1785. $14,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> CLEMENS, Samuel Langhorne (“Mark Twain”). <i>The Writings of…</i> Hartford: American Publishing Co., 1899–1900. $12,000 to $16,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. SHAKESPEARE, William. <i>The Poems of…</i> Edited by Frederick S. Ellis. Hammersmith: William Morris for the Kelmscott Press, 1893. $12,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> LONDON, Jack. <i>The Call of the Wild.</i> New York: The Macmillan Company, 1905. PRESENTATION COPY INSCRIBED BY LONDON. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> CROWLEY, Aleister (1875–1947). <i>The Winged Beetle.</i> London: privately printed, 1910. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> WILDE, Oscar (“C.3.3.”). <i>The Ballad of Reading Gaol.</i> London: Leonard Smithers, January 1898. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> DRYDEN, John. <i>Fables Ancient and Modern; translated into verse from Homer, Ovid, Boccace, & Chaucer: with original poems.</i> London: John Tonson, 1700. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [MAP]. LINSCHOTEN, Jan Huygen van. <i>Delineatio Orarum Maritimarum…</i> London: John Wolfe, 1598. $3,000 to $4,000.
  • <center><b>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>October 13, 2022</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 109. Miguel de Cervantes. <i>The History of Don-Quichote. The first parte.</i> London: William Stansby for Edward Blount, 1620. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 43. Franklin Delano Roosevelt. <i>Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill.</i> Washington: The White House, Christmastide, 1942. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 113. Charles Darwin. A collection of 26 titles including <i>On the Origin of Species.</i> $10,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 210. Philip Guston. Important correspondence between Philip Guston and Ralph and Martha Hyams. New York, 1967-76. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 26. John F. Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe. Signed guest book and original photos from the May 19, 1962 reception. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <center><b>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>October 13, 2022</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 194. J.R.R. Tolkien. <i>The Lord of the Rings Trilogy.</i> London: George Allen and Unwin, 1954-1954-1955. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 164. Max Beerbohm. Autograph Manuscript for The Happy Hypocrite, circa 1896. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 158. Mark Twain. <i>The Writings.</i> Hartford: American Publishing Company, 1899-1907. The Autograph Edition. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 150. Lady Dilke. <i>French Painters of the XVIIIth Century.</i> London: George Bell, 1899. First edition. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 200. Ludwig Bemelmans. Original sketch of Madeline, ink and gouache. $4,000 to $6,000.

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