• <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Zang Tumb Tuuum:<br>la révolution futuriste<br>Online Auction<br>30 November – 7 December</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 18:</b> The "Official Edition" of the United States Constitution and the First Printing of the Final Text of the Constitution, 1787. $15,000,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 30 – Dec. 7:</b> Marinetti, Filippo Tommaso. I Paroliberi Futuristi. 1914-1915. 8 p. Unique corrected proofs, for an anthology that remained unpublished. €40,000 to €60,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 30 – Dec. 7:</b> Cangiullo, Francesco. Studenti in Lettere. Università. 1915. Seminal work, featured in 3 historical futurist exhibitions. €20,000 to €30,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 30 – Dec. 7:</b> Cangiullo, Francesco. Chiaro di luna. Circa 1915. Collage and gouache on paper. €15,000 to €20,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 30 – Dec. 7:</b> Marinetti, Filippo Tommaso. Manicure. Faire les ongles à l'Italie. Circa 1915. A fantastic parody of an advertising poster. €20,000 to €30,000.
  • <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Ortelius (Abraham). <i>Theatrum Orbis Terrarum,</i> folio, Antwerp, 1570, First Edition (2nd Issue), 53 double-page maps, contemporary hand colouring. €40,000 to €60,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> An original engraved facsimile copy of the Declaration of Independence of 4 July 1776, issued by order of Congress on 4 July 1823 in a limited edition of 200 copies on fine parchment. €20,000 to €30,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Joyce (James). <i>Ulysses.</i> Shakespeare & Co., Rue de l’Odeon, Paris 1922. No. 559 of 1000 Copies of the First Edn.,, one of 750 Copies on handmade paper. €10,000 to €15,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Malton (James) [1761-1803]. A fine quality set of twenty-five hand coloured aquatint Views of Dublin, as published for <i>A Picturesque and Descriptive View of the City of Dublin</i>. €6,000 to €7,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> 'Bloody Sunday.' An original Admission Ticket to Croke Park, Great Challenge Match (Football), Tipperary v. Dublin, Sunday, November 21,1920. Pink card, 3 ins x 4 ¼ ins. €4,000 to €5,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Joyce (James). <i>Haveth Childers Everywhere - Fragment from Work in Progress,</i> Paris & N.Y., 1930, First Edn., Signed and Limited No. 50 (100) Copies. €4,000 to €6,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Edward Lyons, Irish (1726-1801). Genealogy: <i>The FitzGerald's Arms of Carton House, Kildare,</i> pen and ink and watercolour on laid paper. €3,000 to €4,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Yeats (William Butler). <i>Poems.</i> Cuala Press, D. 1935, stiff blue paper covers, unlettered as issued, coloured initials and ornaments hand-drawn by Elizabeth Corbet Yeats. One of 300 copies. €2,000 to €3,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> A fine and important collection of Ulster Wit. Belfast Political Scrapbook, 19th century. €1,500 to €2,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Rare Views of the Giant's Causeway. Coloured Prints: Drury (Susanna) [1698-1770]. A rare pair of original Engraved Prints. €1,200 to €1,500.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> [Johnson (Rev. Samuel)]. <i>Julian the Apsostate Being a Short Account of his Life, together with a Comparison of Popery and Paganism,</i> L., 1682, First Edn. €800 to €1,200.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Aringhi (Pauli). <i>Roma Subterranea Novissima,</i> 2 vols. lg. folio Rome (Typis Vitalis Mascardi) 1651. €350 to €750.
  • <b><center>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>December 9</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 47. Roosevelt, Theodore. Photograph inscribed to Morris J. Hirsch. May 7th 1918. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 178. Whitman, Walt. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York: [Printed for the author], 1955. First edition in the first issue binding. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 38. Mather, Cotton. <i>Magnalia Christi Americana; or, the Ecclesiastical History of New-England.</i> London: Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, 1702. First edition. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 55. Taylor, Zachary. Autograph letter signed as President-Elect. Baton Rouge: January 15, 1849. $5,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 203. Picasso, Pablo. <i>Verve</i> Vol. V, Nos. 19-20. Paris: Editions Verve, 1948. Inscribed on the title page by Picasso. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b><center>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>December 9</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 211. Domergue, Jean-Gabriel. L'Ete a Monte Carlo. Lithographed poster, Lucien Serre & Cie, Paris, circa 1937. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 105. Manuscript Illumination attr. to Neri da Rimini. Large excised initial "N" from a choirbook, extensively historiated. [Likely Rimini: first quarter of the 14th century]. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 40. McKenney, Thomas L. and Hall, James. <i>History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs.</i> Philadelphia: Rice, Rutter & Co., 1870. $3,00
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 222. Searle, Ronald. [Pets--a dog, cats and a parrot-- surrounded by books, and inspecting a globe, perhaps planning global domination]. Original drawing, 17 3/8 x 13 1/2 inches. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 98. Faden, William; Scull, Nicholas and George Heap. A Plan of the City and Environs of Philadelphia, Survey'd by N. Scull and G. Heap. London: William Faden, 12 March 1777. $3,000 to $5,000.
  • <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. Autograph Letter Signed ("B. Franklin"), to Benjamin Vaughan asserting the primacy of American independence in negotiating the Treaty of Paris, Passy, July 11, 1782. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. Autograph Letter Signed ("B. Franklin") to David Hartley addressing Hartley's final issues with the recently completed ratification of the Treaty of Paris, Passy, June 2, 1784. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> MASON & DIXON. A hand-colored contemporary manuscript map titled in cartouche, "A Map of that Part of AMERICA where a degree of LATITUDE was measured for the ROYAL SOCIETY, by Chas Mason & Jer: Dixon," c.1768. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("WB Yeats"), a fair copy of "When Helen Lived" for John Preece headed ("For John Preece"), framed. $5,000 to $7,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> "LINCOLN SEATED." KECK, CHARLES, sculptor. 1875-1951. Patinated bronze, 1950. Louise Taper Collection. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> ABRAHAM LINCOLN'S FINAL HOURS. BURNS, J., painter. <i>Death-Bed of Abraham Lincoln.</i> Oil on canvas, 1866. Collection of Louise Taper. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> FILSON, CHARLES PATTERSON, painter. 1860-1937. <i>Portrait of Edwin M. Stanton, Lincoln's Secretary of War.</i> $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> A MATZOS BOX PRESENTED BY THE MANISHEVITZ BROTHERS TO WARREN G. HARDING. Louise Taper Collection. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> LEWIS CARROLL. Original albumen print photograph, approximately 6 7/8 x 8 3/4 inches, Chelsea, London, October 7, 1863, of the Rossetti Family at home, one of only three known examples of the full image. $50,000 to $70,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> CHRISTINA ROSSETTI. <i>Verses ... Dedicated to Her Mother.</i> Privately printed, 1847. First edition of her first book, printed at her grandfather's press, THE ROSSETTI FAMILY COPY. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> CHRISTINA ROSSETTI. Original drawing of snowdrops in purple pencil, sent by CGR to Lucy Rossetti, inscribed "I doubt whether you will make out my copy from nature," 1887. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI, et al. The Germ: <i>Thoughts towards Nature in Poetry, Literature and Art.</i> Fine copy in a Doves binding by Cobden Sanderson. $12,000 to $18,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - July - 2021 Issue

Sotheran’s, Historic London Bookseller, Reports on Emergence from Pandemic

219a09fb-7fda-4383-b554-823bc39426da

London is emerging from one of the most challenging years in its history.

Sotheran's home is London,” wrote Chris Saunders, 47, the managing director for Henry Sotheran Ltd. “ We've been here for over 200 years, which is a long time, but only the blink of an eye for a city with Roman origins, a city that has survived the Black Death, the Great Fire and the Blitz.”

 

Who better, we thought, to update us on how this company and the book world in London is emerging from the pandemic?

 

Asked about the impact of the health emergency Saunders replied,The covid lockdown affected our business almost instantly. Sales plummeted until we got our digital campaigns up to speed, and even then we're down about 40% on a usual year. A lot of our employees were furloughed and for the first lockdown we had one or two people coming in once a week to pack orders, while everyone else who was working was working from home.

 

Working from home turned out OK for most people, the main difficulty being the logistics of sending and receiving stock and the inevitable meltdowns of remote working systems. Now the shop has re-opened but we are operating with a skeleton crew, as there is not enough footfall to warrant a full re-opening and some restrictions on people mixing are still in place.

 

As for morale, initially, he observed …”the first three months of the pandemic were a time of Blitz spirit, applauding the National Health Service and knitting facemasks, and as time wore on people retreated into themselves. It is hard not to when you are prevented from seeing even your own family. London has actually been relatively safe compared to some of the northern cities - places like Liverpool and Leicester spent months under the most severe lockdown regulations, and times were very hard up there.

 

."What sticks in the mind is the sheer drudgery of living and working under lockdown. Nothing dramatic or funny really happened during the pandemic because everyone was at home and the only contact most people had was online. This means that there is a general sympathy among people in the trade, but no real stories to tell, apart from news of illness or deaths. The Antiquarian Booksellers Association (ABA) and Provincial Booksellers Fairs Association (PBFA) have done what they can to bring people together through online fairs and discussions, but it all feels very atomised. The biggest news anyone has is the date of their vaccination.

 

I have to say, I don't think anyone has encountered anything quite like the covid pandemic before. Even during the Blitz, people were allowed to go in to work, and Sotheran's did a pretty good trade during the war selling to people like Churchill and Viscount Alanbrooke who had offices just down the road. The bombing of London did destroy our archives, but the shop was miraculously left unscathed. Of course, the war wasn't great for the economy, and Sotheran's only just survived the Great Depression through the investment of Gabriel Wells, but the company has always adapted in order to survive.

 

Asked if Sotheran’s made a significant effort to sell virtually, he reported: “We have done a couple of online fairs, mainly the ABA's Firsts Online. The first one was very good, but the response of the public seems to have diminished which each successive fair. I wonder if people are bored of online fairs now, which I find are often hard to navigate and unfocussed, and are holding fire now that real-life fairs are on the horizon again.

 

Necessity being the mother of invention, we have expanded our digital presence beyond our previous imaginings. We now have over 32k Twitter followers, tens of thousands of visitors to our website and ever increasing online sales - it has taken a global pandemic of medieval proportions to drag us into the twenty-first century. It is very encouraging for the future, though, to have built this digital foundation for the revival of our very analogue business. We have picked up new customers in corners of the world that we haven't previously touched, and who come back to us, which can only be good.

 

Our plan is to keep going, grow the digital side of the business further, and make the shop even more special than it already is so that when people come back to London they rush over to see us!

 

Saunders thought the experiences of business in the US and the UK had some similarities: “There were various government schemes - business loans, reductions in business rates (the tax we pay on our premises), grants, the furlough scheme in which the government pays 80% of staff wages - all of which we used, and which, with a rent reduction from our landlord, have helped to see us through. There was a moratorium on evictions for both residential and commercial properties. Some of these measures are ongoing, which is good because we have only been able to re-open our doors on April 12th this year with a lot of restrictions, after two false starts last year.

 

We were able to open in the summer and just before Christmas, but as soon as we got any momentum going we had to shut again due to rising infection rates. We hope this time that the vaccination programme, which has been efficient against all expectations, means we can stay open permanently. We need to start selling strongly so that when the government help stops we are not left on a cliff-edge.

 

Fortunately, he wrote: “Our staff have largely remained healthy - a couple of people suspect that they might have had covid early on, before there was any proper testing, but we shall probably never know. Everyone who is eligible to be vaccinated (over 30s at the time of writing) has had at least one jab, which is really encouraging. We have lost some customers - some customers we knew very well, which is horribly sad. In the shop we haven't really experienced any backlash against wearing masks. Anti-vaxxers do exist, and they do have small demonstrations, but I don't think anyone other than themselves takes them very seriously.

 

Everything in Britain rests on the vaccination programme. Boris Johnson is very lucky that the scientists bailed him out, because without the vaccinations the UK would be in real trouble. As it is, there is a lot of worry over the Indian variant, but I think we're all optimistic that we will pull through that as more people get the jab.

 

If you want to talk about parallels between the political situations in the UK and US, you should talk about Brexit, the effects of which have been obscured by the pandemic but which is, I think, a time bomb waiting to go off underneath the government. The fishing industry realises it has been sold a lemon, and when the pandemic calms down we will all begin to see the repercussions. Already, we have trouble exporting to the EU in terms of customs duties and taxes that our clients now have to pay.

 

The George Floyd incident was obviously of bigger import in the States, but it did have a big impact here. Black Lives Matter has become very influential, especially among younger people, and the race debate has really come to the forefront. The UK has plenty of racists who use the 'All Lives Matter' slogan to hide behind, and I think BLM has made us all think more about the language we use about race, as well as about the history of racism.

 

I think the US Capitol attack was, to most Brits, completely incomprehensible. Why were people engaging in armed combat to defend someone like Donald Trump? We read the analyses, but we are missing that visceral feeling that people in the States obviously have.

 

Turning back to the book business, he remarked: “What we have seen is that the book trade is resilient - collectors still want to buy lovely things, and are generally very understanding about the logistical problems and delays and extra expense that operating in a pandemic can bring. In some ways it has brought us closer to our customers. There has been an enormous amount of goodwill, which I think is so encouraging for the trade as we rebuild over the next couple of years.

 

A lot of the London middle-class did decamp to their holiday homes in Cornwall, against government guidance and much to the concern of the residents there, who all have to use just the one hospital. People have returned to the capital, and we wish more would follow - they are crucial to the London economy, and to the general jollity of the place! We need more tourists too, especially in our area of London where there isn't really a residential community, but with continued travel restrictions I don't think we will see many until next year.

 

Now London is emerging from one of the most challenging years in its history and we want to play our part in celebrating the resilience and spirit of our great city. As shops, restaurants and museums open and people are once more out and about, we are very happy to throw our doors wide and present a collection of books on London, covering its history, culture, architecture and people.”

 

sotherans.co.uk/collections/london-21

 

About Sotheran’s Ltd: We were founded in York in 1761 by Henry Sotheran, and moved down to London in 1805. We are still family owned, though not by the Sotherans - the last Sotheran was killed by a tram in the 1930s. There have been other branches, but for now it's just Sackville Street. We have 11 staff, roughly 8,500 items of inventory, and we try to be fairly general but have special interests in natural history, travel, children's books, literature, travel posters and John Gould. We bought the great ornithologist's entire estate when he died in the 1880s, so his work really is part of our heritage. Sotheran's also commissioned the Great Omar, the stupendously bound book that went to the bottom of the ocean on the Titanic,and was heavily involved in the early days of the Folger and the Morgan libraries.

 

Chris Saunders has been at Sotheran's since 2004. He took over as Managing Director in 2018. His own area of specialty is Natural History, especially Darwinism. Reach him at: cs@sotherans.co.uk

 

 

Henry Sotheran Ltd.

2-5 Sackville Street

London

W1S 3DP

United Kingdom

 

Tel: 0207 439 6151

Fax: 0207 434 2019

www.sotherans.co.uk

 

ABA-ILAB-PBFA


Posted On: 2021-07-02 02:39
User Name: midsomer

Armed combat at the Capitol? Chris Saunders what you talking about? Maybe you Brits are more misinformed than I thought. Or maybe it's just you and your liberal bias. If you look at the facts the violence, looting, arson, murder, etc by the BLM groups (that you so adore) last year dwarf what happened at the Capitol a hundredfold. But you conveniently left that out. Chris, ALL Lives Do Matter. Just stick to talking about books.


Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><br>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Maps & Atlases<br>Natural History<br>& Color Plate Books<br>December 9, 2021</b>
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> AUDUBON, JOHN JAMES. Carolina Parrot. Plate 26. Hand-colored aquatint and engraved plate from Audubon's <i>Birds of America.</i> $80,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> Francisco Henrique Carls. [Album de Pernambuco e seus Arrabaldes]. Fifty-three chromolithographed plates of landscape, town views and more of the state of Pernambuco, northeast Brazil. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> Captain Thomas Davies, after. Group of 5 engraved topographical scenes of North American waterfalls. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <center><br>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Maps & Atlases<br>Natural History<br>& Color Plate Books<br>December 9, 2021</b>
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> William R. Morley. Morley's Map of New Mexico. Large lithographed pocket map with original hand-color in outline. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> Frederick William Beechey, et al. <i>The Zoology of Captain Beechey's Voyage; Compiled from the Collections and Notes Made by Captain Beechey…</i> $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> ZUDA ROKASHI (Priest Hotan.) Nansenbushu Bankoku Shoka No Zu. Woodblock wall map of the world on 16 sheets joined. $5,000 to $7,500.
  • <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> De Wit’s composite atlas with magnificent full original color. $125,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Gardner's photographic sketch book of the Civil War. $200,000 to $250,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Waugh Oil Painting, 70 Degrees North; The Polar Bear. $400,000 to $600,000.
    <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Audubon aquatint, Ivory-Billed Woodpecker. $75,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Blaeu terrestrial table globe, 1602. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Audubon aquautint, Ruby-Throated Humming Bird. $35,000 to $45,000.
    <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Bessa original watercolor of a bouquet of flowers. $75,000 to $125,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> John Gould's only work devoted to American birds. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Wyld & Malby pair of terrestrial & celestial globes, 1833. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Leutze map of the world oil painting. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Caula, the finest 18th century drawing of Lison. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Scolari / Blaeu map of Germania, 1650. $15,000 to $22,000.
  • <i>Der Sturm.</i> 1922. Sold October 2021 for € 13,000.
    Diophantus Alexandrinus, <i>Arithmeticorum libri sex.</i> 1670. Sold October 2021 for € 18,000.
    <i>Cozzani Ettore e altri, l’Eroica. Tutto il pubblicato.</i> Sold October 2021 for € 11,000.
    Newton Isaac, <i>Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica.</i> 1714. Sold October 2021 for € 7,500.
    Manetti Saverio, <i>Storia naturale degli uccelli.</i> 1767-1776. Sold April 2021 for € 26,000.

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