Rare Book Monthly

Articles - April - 2019 Issue

Cyberbullying

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We recently received a request from a reader that is outside the normal scope of this site. It was to post a link to a guide offering advice on how to stay safe from cyberbullying. We will provide a link to it at the end of this article. While the guide is directed specifically to the LGBTQ community, much of the advice can apply to those bullied for any number of reasons. Some can even apply to in-person, rather than cyber bullying. While this website is devoted to the collecting of rare books and paper, we too inhabit the cyber world. We could not exist without it. As one that benefits from the internet, we also share in the responsibility for its content. The internet is a fantastic invention, a wonderful source of information, entertainment, and friendship. It can also be an awful place.

 

In her message, Jane related that 73% of the LGBTQ community has been harassed online due to gender identity or sexual orientation. I imagine there are many others who have been harassed over race, ethnicity, religion, national origin, physical or intellectual limitations, gender, and probably just about anything else you can think of. We have all seen it at times on various message boards, chat rooms, social media sites, and in comments sections at the end of legitimate news stories. Some websites even specialize in it. It got us to thinking. Why?

 

Prejudice, hate, and intolerance, are nothing new. We have dealt with it for centuries, and yet, I find something particularly disconcerting about the times in which we live today. Of course, all times have had these negatives, and we have come a long way since my youth too long ago. I can speak only for my home country of America, but in my youth, African-Americans could not go to the same schools, stay in the same hotels, eat at the same restaurants, drink from the same water fountains as others in large swaths of this country. This has changed drastically for the better since the 1950s. As for the LGBTQ community, it has only become relatively safe to come out and obtain some of the rights of others in the last two decades. Going back to my parents' generation, my mother could remember women fighting for the right to vote. Women still are not paid equally for comparable work, but in my youth, women, if they went into the workplace, were mostly limited to being secretaries, nurses, and schoolteachers. When children played doctor and nurse, there was never any question as to which gender child played which role. That has changed.

 

Normally, this is comforting. Today, I don't find that to be true, and that is why I find today's difficult times more troubling than those of the past. America was founded on the highest of principles, the "self-evident" truth that all men are created equal, that we are endowed with unalienable rights including life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. We didn't fully live up to those ideals. Washington owned slaves. Jefferson had children with one of his slaves. Despite the preceding language, few blacks could vote, the same went for whites who did not own property, no women could vote. All sorts of discrimination took place and the founders either couldn't see it or looked the other way. A few generations later, even Lincoln was willing to accept slavery in the South before the war so long as it was not allowed to spread to new territories. If any of them were notably concerned about women's rights it's news to me. I can't imagine that the thought of LGBTQ rights ever occurred to any of them.

 

And yet, they are, in my opinion rightly, still honored today. They created freedoms hitherto unknown to the world. Call them hypocrites if you will, but I think that misses the point of what they accomplished. Even if they failed to fully live up to their ideals, they still set the ideals for the generations that followed. They knew the right direction, even if they could not travel all the way down the road. And, for generations, our leaders have continued to speak in higher moral tones, though many fell short. They at least knew what was right and spoke the words, and we all learned right from wrong, despite our personal shortcomings. We did not achieve perfection, but the words kept us moving forward, and we became a better society generation by generation. Yesterday's expressed but unrealized ideals became the next generation's higher standards. It turned the words of the Declaration of Independence into a reality, or at least, much closer to reality.

 

Today, something has changed, and it is not like anything I have seen before. Our leaders do not seem to be leading us forward any longer. Indeed, at times they seem to be dragging us backward. Words of bigotry, intolerance, hate, those that people previously would have known to condemn, even if they harbored some within their hearts, are becoming acceptable to speak. And spoken words become actions.

 

I write this just a few days after 50 people praying in New Zealand were gunned down by someone who felt it was acceptable to put his worst instincts into action. This is not just an American problem. Europe is now plagued with movements fueled by intolerance, and we all know where that can lead. The light of freedom ignited in Russia at the fall of Communism has been snuffed out by a new but equally brutal regime. Improved economic conditions in China have failed to result in notable human rights, as that regime now seems to be moving backward. The Arab Spring has turned to winter. This is a world problem.

 

Just as the ideals expressed by America's founders proved to be a prophesy of what generations later would become, I fear the retreat from those ideals expressed from our leaders now will also be a prophesy of our future. It surely will, if we trade the ideals of freedom and equality, that wonderful gift of our founders, for something akin to our basest instincts.

 

While I have no groundbreaking solutions to this problem, here is something we all can do. Do not support those who preach hate and intolerance. Do not give their words undeserved respect. Do not give them positive feedback. Separate yourself from their words. Most bullies are insecure. They seek attention through bad behavior. Do not accommodate them. Help them if you can, reinforce positive change, but do not provide any hints of legitimacy to their ugly words. Make their bad behavior counterproductive. That will change some, though not all, but pushing antisocial behavior back to the fringes is better than letting it thrive and grow in the light of day.

 

Thank you, Jane, for a reminder of our responsibilities, as a website, as human beings.

 

Here is a link to the LBGTQ online safety guide Jane recommended: www.vpnmentor.com/blog/lgbtq-guide-online-safety.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> SMITH, CHRISTOPHER WEBB. 1793-1871. <i>Indian Ornithology.</i> [Patna, India]: 1828. $50,000 to $80,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> DUPRÉ, LOUIS. 1789-1837. <i>Voyage à Athènes et à Constantinople, ou Collection de portraits, vues et costumes grecs et ottomans.</i> Paris: Dondey-Dupré, 1825. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> ADAMS, JOHN. Autograph Letter Signed ("J Adams"), [to Dr. Perkins?] while recovering from his small pox inoculation, [late-April, 1764]. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> AUSTEN, JANE. Autograph Letter Signed ("J. Austen"), to her sister Cassandra, 4 pp, "Thursday – after dinner," [September 16, 1813,] Henrietta St. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> AUDUBON, JOHN JAMES. 1785-1851. <i>The Birds of America, from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> New York & Philadelphia: J.J. Audubon & J.B. Chevalier, 1840-1844. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> DODWELL, EDWARD. 1767-1832. <i>Views in Greece.</i> London: Rodwell and Martin, 1821. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> JAMES, JESSE. Autograph Letter Signed ("Jesse W. James"), to Mr. Flood demanding Flood retract spurious accusations, 3 pp, June 5, 1875. $200,000 to $300,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> DE CORDOBA, JACOB. <i>Map of the State of Texas.</i> New York, 1866. $15,000 to $20,000
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> ARNOLD, BENEDICT. Autograph bookseller's receipt for Dr. John Dickinson, Signed ("B. Arnold"), February 1767. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. 4 Typed Letters Signed ("A Einstein") to Cleveland E. Dodge offering early reports on the meetings of the Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> EISENHOWER, DWIGHT D. Typed Letter Signed ("Dwight D. Eisenhower") to General Henri Giraud written from a secret bunker in Gibraltar on the eve of Operation Torch, November 4 [but 6], 1942. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> Early Broadside Printing of the GADSDEN PURCHASE, Puebla, August 16, 1854. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> ALLEN, ETHAN. Autograph Letter Signed to Crevecouer during the Constitutional Debates in Congress, 2 pp, August 29, 1787. $30,000 to $50,000.
  • <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Library of a Midwestern Collector<br>November 5, 2019</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 5:</b> DARWIN, Charles. <i>On the Origin of Species.</i> London John Murray, 1859. FIRST EDITION. THE VERY FINE MELLON-GARDEN COPY. $120,000 to $180,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions Auctioneers, Nov. 5:</b> ECKERT, J. P, H. H. GOLDSTINE, and J. G. BRAINERD. <i>Description of the ENIAC and comments on electronic digital computing machines.</i> N.p., 1945. FIRST EDITION, INSCRIBED BY GOLDSTINE. $5,000 to $7,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 5:</b> EUCLID. <i>Elementa geometriae.</i> Translated from the Arabic by Adelard of Bath. Venice: Erhard Ratdolt, 25 May 1482. FIRST EDITION. $60,000 to $80,000
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Library of a Midwestern Collector<br>November 5, 2019</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 5:</b> [HAMILTON, Alexander, James MADISON and John JAY]. <i>The Federalist: A Collection of Essays…</i> New York: John and Andrew M'Lean, 1788. FIRST EDITION. $60,000 to $80,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 5:</b> GALILEI, Galileo. <i>Dialogo...Dove ne i congressi di quattro giornate si discorre sopra i due massimi sistemi del mondo Tolemaico, e Copernicano.</i> Florence, 1632. FIRST EDITION. $30,000 to $40,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 5:</b> JOYCE, James. <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1922. FIRST EDITION, ONE OF 100 COPIES SIGNED BY JOYCE. $120,000 to $180,000
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Library of a Midwestern Collector<br>November 5, 2019</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 5:</b> KEYNES, John Maynard. <i>The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money.</i> London: Macmillan, 1936. FIRST EDITION. $5,000 to $7,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 5:</b> NEWTON, Isaac, Sir. <i>Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica.</i> London: Joseph Streater for the Royal Society, 1687. FIRST EDITION. $150,000 to $250,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 5:</b> ROWLING, J. K. <i>Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.</i> London: Bloomsbury, 1997. FIRST EDITION, SIGNED BY ROWLING. $80,000 to $120,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 5:</b> SMITH, Adam. <i>An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations.</i> London: for W. Strahan and T. Cadell, 1776. FIRST EDITION. $70,000 to $90,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 24:</b> Sir Isaac Newton, <i>Opticks,</i> first edition, first issue, London, 1704. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 24:</b> Johannes Jacobus Canis, <i>De modo studendi in utroque iure,</i> first edition, Padua, 1476. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 24:</b> Pope Clemens V, <i>Constitutiones,</i> Nuremberg, 1482. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 24:</b> Nicolaus Panormitanus de Tudeschis, <i>Lectura super V libris Decretalium,</i> Basel, 1480-81. $5,000 to $7,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 24:</b> Michael Faraday, <i>Experimental Researches in Electricity,</i> complete set, first editions, London, 1832-56. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 24:</b> William Gilbert, <i>Tractatus sive physiologia nova de magnete,</i> Sedini, 1628. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 24:</b> John Bulwer, <i>Philocophus,</i> first edition of the first book in English on the deaf, London, 1648. $1,000 to $2,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 24:</b> James Cook, complete set, 9 volumes, London, 1773-84. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 24:</b> Nicolaus Bertrand, <i>Opus de Tholosano[rum] Gestis ab Urbe Condita,</i> with the earliest known view of the city of Toulouse, 1515. $2,000 to $3,000.
  • <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts Including Americana<br>November 6, 2019</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 6:</b> RATZER, Bernard. <i>Plan of the City of New York in North America, surveyed in the years 1766 & 1767.</i> London: Jefferys and Faden, “Jan.y” 12, 1776. $80,000 to $120,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 6:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. COCKERELL, Sydney C. <i>Some German Woodcuts of the Fifteenth Century.</i> Hammersmith: The Kelmscott Press, 1897 [issued 1898]. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 6:</b> [GOLDEN COCKEREL PRESS]. KEATS, John. <i>Lamia, Isabella, the Eve of Saint Agnes and Other Poems.</i> Waltham Saint Lawrence, Berkshire: The Golden Cockerel Press, 1928. $6,000 to $8,000
    <center> <b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts Including Americana<br>November 6, 2019</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 6:</b> [GRANT, Ulysses S.— GRANT, Julia, First Lady]. Carved Applewood and 18-karat Gold Jewelry Suite, Browne & Spaulding, Jewelers, New York City, 1865. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 6:</b> [LINCOLN ASSASSINATION]. GARDNER, Alexander. <i>Incidents of the War |Sic Semper Sicariis</i> [caption title]. Washington, D. C.: Philip & Solomons, 1865. $5,000 to $7,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 6:</b> A COMPLETE COLLECTION of 115 titles published in R. R. Donnelley's Lakeside Classics series. Chicago, 1903-2017. COMPLETE RUN OF THE LONGEST-RUNNING CONTINUOUS SERIES OF BOOKS IN THE WORLD. $5,000 to $7,000
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts Including Americana<br>November 6, 2019</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 6:</b> GLEIZES, Albert. METZINGER, Jean. <i>Du Cubisme.</i> Paris, 1947. LIMITED EDITION, number 19 of 20 copies on papier d'Auvergne. $3,000 to $4,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 6:</b> [THE LITTLE REVIEW]. ANDERSON, Margaret, ed. POUND, Ezra, ed. HEAP, Jane, ed. <i>The Little Review.</i> Vol. I, No. 1 through Vol. XII, No. 2. 1914-1929. $3,000 to $4,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 6:</b> [MOUNTENEY, Leonard, binder]. LOUŸS, Pierre. <i>Songs of Bilitis.</i> Chicago: Argus Books, 1931. $2,000 to $3,000
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Nov. 6:</b> [HANCOCK, John]. Partly-printed U.S. Loan-Office Transfer Certificate issued on behalf of Hancock. Sgn’d on recto by William Imlay, as Commissioner of Loans of Connecticut. 28 February 1793. $2,000 to $3,000

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