• <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> THE <br>QUILL. <i>A Magazine of Greenwich Village</i>. 30 issues, 1918-1925 Estimate: $1,000-2,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> VIEW:<br>The Modern Magazine. Marcel Duchamp number. March, 1945. Estimate: 400-600
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Ortelius, Abraham. Maris Pacifici. [Antwerp], 1589.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Melville, Herman. <i>Moby Dick; or, The Whale</i>. New York, 1851. First American edition, first issue.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers: Fine Books and Manuscripts, May 7, 2015.</b>
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. <i>Works </i>. Garden City, 1930. 24 vols. Signed. 
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Pockocke, Richard. <i>A Description of the East,</i> and Some Other Countries.London, 1743-1745. First edition.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Audubon, John James, after. <i>American Elk - Apiti Deer, Cervus Canadensus</i>, plate LXII, no. 13.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Felix. Autographed letter signed, July 20, 1832. To Aloys Fuchs.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers: Fine Books and Manuscripts, May 7, 2015.</b>
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Lee, Robert E. Autographed letter signed, to Ulysses S. Grant. February 21, 1865.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Campbell, Colin. <i>Vitruvius Britannicus</i>. London, 1715-125, 1767, 1771. 5 vols. First edition
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Autographed letter signed, 1p., to Judge W.A. Minshall. September 6, 1849.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> A Century <br>of Progress International Exposition. Chicago, 1933-1934. Chicago,<br>(c. 1934). Mayor Cermak copy.).
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> The Nonesuch Dickens. Bloomsbury, 1937-1938. 22 volumes, limited.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Gold mining boomtown collection of 23 photos<br>of Goldfield, Nevada (1905)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Columbus and New World Exploration manuscript (1512)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> A. J. Russell.<br>The Great West (1869) 50 original mounted photos
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 18/19</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Missale Romanum ad usum Mechliniensem. About 1420.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Missale Parisiensis. 1516.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b><br>C. Gesner, De omni rerum fossilium genere. 1565-66.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b><br>M. Lawrance, A collection of roses from nature. 1796-99.
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 18/19</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b><br>T. Porcacchi, L'isole piu famose del mondo. 1576.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Maximilian zu Neuwied, Reise in das Innere Nord-America.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b><br>E. A. Poe, The Raven and Other Poems. 1845.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Colette, La naissance du jour. 1932. Binding by G. Cretté.
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 18/19</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b><br>H. Hesse, Piktor's Verwandlungen. Manuscript. 1934.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b><br>J. Cassou, Vingt-deux poèmes accompagnés par des images. 1978.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b><br>S. Poliakoff. - Platon, Parménide. 1964.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Johannes de Sacro Bosco, Sphaera mundi. 1499.
  • <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Manuscripts
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Miniatures
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Early Printed Books
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Jason Master, Haarlem, c. 1475-80
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Boucicaut Master, Paris, c. 1415
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Rohan Master, probably Troyes, c. 1415-20
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Julius Caesar, De bello Gallico, manuscript on vellum, Milan, c. 1450-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Biblia Latina, Paris, 1476-77, first edition of the Vulgate printed in France
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Ludolph of Saxony, Vie du Christ, illuminated by the Master of the Chronique Scandaleuse, 1506-08
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b><br>King David, miniature on vellum, Bologna, c. 1470
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Christ calling St. Peter, miniature on vellum, by Pellegrino di Mariano Rossini, Siena, 1471
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Presentation in Temple, miniature on vellum, Nuremberg, c. 1490-1500
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Bible, illuminated in the <i>primo stile</i>, Bologna, c. 1250-70
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Valturio, De re militari, Verona 1483, first edition in Italian
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Celestial vision at Constantinople, single-leaf woodcut, Nuremberg,<br>c. 1490-91

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - June - 2008 Issue

Images of Plants, Animals, and the Old West at Arader Galleries

Arader06-08

The Arader Galleries latest Directors' report.


By Michael Stillman

The latest issue of Arader Galleries' Directors' Report, for May-June 2008, is now available. These Reports aren't catalogues, but updates of what is going on, or some of the special items on display, at various Arader Galleries. There are six of them now, two in New York, and one each in Philadelphia, Denver, Houston, and San Francisco. Most people in America should be reasonably close to one, though it is a bit of a haul if you live in North Dakota. Nevertheless, it's good to get away for awhile, so you might want to plan a trip to one of these locales. Here are a few of the topics discussed in the latest Directors' Report.

On the cover of the Report you will see some classic American book art, created for the covers or advertising of novels on the American West. These books were extremely popular during the first half of the 20th century. "Kids" of all ages couldn't put down these tales of cowboys and Indians, good guys and bad guys, lawmen and villains. These were morality plays of good and evil, though some certainly did not place Native Americans fairly on that spectrum. Few of these writers were appreciated by their contemporaries. These books were considered dime novels, cheap entertainment with little literary merit. However, looking back, we can appreciate the skill many of these writers brought to their craft. And, we can certainly appreciate the cover art, dramatic and enticing, if not always true to life. The Arader Galleries in New York has a collection of this artwork in their New York gallery.

John and William Bartram, father and son, were two of America's earliest botanists. They undertook several journeys into the wilderness, particularly the South, to discover, describe, and bring back specimens of plants at the time unknown. They discovered the Venus Flytrap and the very rare "Franklin Tree," named for their good friend Benjamin Franklin. The Franklin Tree was found only on a couple of acres in Georgia, and went extinct in the wild two centuries ago. It survives today only through the offspring of seeds the Bartrams took back to Philadelphia. Arader has copies of John Bartram's 1769 A Description of East-Florida with a Journal kept by John Bartram... not only an outstanding botany but one of the best early descriptions of Florida, and William Bartram's 1791 Travels Through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East & West Florida... which also tells much about the territories' natural history and the Indians who lived there. These two important works are also in New York.

John James Audubon is best remembered for his Birds of America, but his follow-up was quite spectacular too. Published from 1845-1848, it is The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America. Now there's a word you probably don't use everyday. "Viviparous" means giving live birth, rather than laying eggs. Audubon's birds were not viviparous. This was Audubon's last work, with many of the illustrations done by his son, John Woodhouse Audubon. You can see images of some of these animals native to Texas at the Houston Gallery.

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