• <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WARREN, JOSEPH. Letter Signed ("Jos Warren") as Chairman of the Committee of Safety. Cambridge, MA, June 4, 1775.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WHITMAN, WALT. Leaves of Grass. Brooklyn, NY: [for the Author], 1855.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> JEFFERSON, THOMAS. Printed Broadside Signed ("Th: Jefferson") as Secretary of State. Philadelphia, February 12, 1793.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> CELLINI, BENVENUTO. 1500-1571. Autograph Letter Signed ("Beto. Cellini"). [Florence, c.1566].
    <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> NAPOLEON BONAPARTE. Autograph Manuscript. [c.1795].
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> DICKENS, CHARLES. Great Expectations. London: Chapman and Hall, 1861.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> REED, JOHN. To the Honourable House of Representatives of the Freemen of Pennsylvania this Map of the City and Liberties of Phiadelphia With the Catalog of Purchasers is Humbly Dedicated.... [Philadelphia]: engraved by James Smit
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> ELIOT, THOMAS STEARNS. The Waste Land. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1922.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Announcing the Fall 2016 Auction Season
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b> 19th & 20th Century Literature
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Colored Plate Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Printed & Manuscript Americana
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Art, Press & Illustrated Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b> Illustration Art
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 3:</b> Old Master Through Modern Prints
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Normal Rockwell. Painting/Drawing Signed. Rockwell's "Barbeshop Quartet", 1936.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1782. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - May - 2007 Issue

The Latest Acquisitions by James Cummins Bookseller

Cummins98

Catalogue 98 from James Cummins Bookseller.


By Michael Stillman

James Cummins Bookseller
has just issued his Catalogue 98, a collection of new acquisitions. "New acquisitions" are difficult to describe beyond saying they were recently acquired. They do not conform to any theme or field of collecting. They just are what they are. In this case, they are a varied but highly collectible group of books, manuscripts, and photographs, material of the first order. Whatever you collect, you will enjoy this catalogue. Here are a few examples.

There is probably no field with more dedicated followers than railroading. Long ago replaced by the automobile as our primary means of transportation, railroads still retain a hold on our dreams and fantasies. Even today they symbolize freedom and adventure. Item 88 is what is known as the first American book on railroads: Documents tending to prove the superior advantages of Rail-ways and Steam-carriages over Canal Navigation. This was a prescient book by a remarkable mind, John Stevens. Among his other ideas not carried out until after his life was over were an armored navy, a bridge over and a vehicular tunnel under the Hudson River, and an elevated train for New York. This book was published in 1812, and in it Stevens calls for a railway to be built from Lake Erie to Albany, which would open the heartland of America to trade. America was not yet ready. Instead, the Erie Canal was constructed along this route, a great success, but not a particularly long lived one. Stevens' railroads and their ability to access just about any place would soon replace canals as the favored means of transportation. Stevens spells out many details for his trains, including cast-iron wheels, raised rails, and a steam-powered engine. Priced at $7,500.

If Stevens dreamed big, Edison not only imagined, but carried out his dreams. Item 26 is The Phonograph and Phonograph Graphophone, a very early pamphlet on the predecessor of the CD player (I can't believe I'm actually describing a phonograph this way). This was published in 1888 by the North American Phonograph Company, a corporation formed by Jesse Lippincott, which bought Edison's rights to the invention. Edison originally patented his phonograph in 1878, but quickly became distracted by other projects, like inventing the electric light. This pamphlet extols the virtues of the phonograph, noting, "How interesting it will be to future generations to learn from the phonograph exactly how Rubinstein played a composition on the piano." This piece is accompanied by an 1889 announcement offering shares in the company. $2,500.

Speaking of shares in a company, how about 100 shares in the original Standard Oil? What might that be worth today? In 1882, John D. Rockefeller merged all of his oil properties in the Standard Oil Trust. It would not only become the biggest energy conglomerate ever amassed, but its absolute domination and control of the market would be the inspiration for various trust-busting measures later adopted. First the properties would be divided among several subsidiaries, and finally, the Standard Oil Trust was dissolved after a 1911 Supreme Court ruling against it. Item 80 is a certificate for 100 shares of Standard Oil, dated 1883, and issued to Wallace C. Andrews, one of its founders. It is signed by Rockefeller and other Standard Oil founders Henry Flagler and J.A. Bostwick. The certificate is priced at $3,000, but would be worth countless millions if you could cash it in for its current value.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, Chicago, 1968). <i>Collection of papers of John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, concerning the convention</i>. Various places, 1968.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (ARMSTRONG, NEIL.) VERNE, JULES. <i>A Trip to the Moon.</i> New York: F. M. Lupton, September 9, 1893. Signed by Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on the moon.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> KEY, FRANCIS SCOTT. <i>A Celebrated Patriotic Song, the Star Spangled Banner.</i> 1814.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> [COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER, Amerigo Vespucci ..] Bernardus Albingaunensis .. Dialogo nuperrime edito Genue in 1512.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (WATKINS, TABER &c.). <i>An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West Various places</i>, c. 1890s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (BATTLE OF CONCORD.) <i>Powder horn used by Minuteman Oliver Buttrick at the Battle of Concord</i>, April 19, 1775.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (CIVIL WAR.) <i>An Extraordinary Confederate Photograph and Autograph Album of Dr. R. L. C. White</i>, 125 original mounted salt prints. 1859-61.

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