• <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Normal Rockwell. Painting/Drawing Signed. Rockwell's "Barbeshop Quartet", 1936.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1782. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, Chicago, 1968). <i>Collection of papers of John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, concerning the convention</i>. Various places, 1968.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (ARMSTRONG, NEIL.) VERNE, JULES. <i>A Trip to the Moon.</i> New York: F. M. Lupton, September 9, 1893. Signed by Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on the moon.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> KEY, FRANCIS SCOTT. <i>A Celebrated Patriotic Song, the Star Spangled Banner.</i> 1814.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> [COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER, Amerigo Vespucci ..] Bernardus Albingaunensis .. Dialogo nuperrime edito Genue in 1512.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (WATKINS, TABER &c.). <i>An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West Various places</i>, c. 1890s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (BATTLE OF CONCORD.) <i>Powder horn used by Minuteman Oliver Buttrick at the Battle of Concord</i>, April 19, 1775.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (CIVIL WAR.) <i>An Extraordinary Confederate Photograph and Autograph Album of Dr. R. L. C. White</i>, 125 original mounted salt prints. 1859-61.
  • <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WARREN, JOSEPH. Letter Signed ("Jos Warren") as Chairman of the Committee of Safety. Cambridge, MA, June 4, 1775.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WHITMAN, WALT. Leaves of Grass. Brooklyn, NY: [for the Author], 1855.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> JEFFERSON, THOMAS. Printed Broadside Signed ("Th: Jefferson") as Secretary of State. Philadelphia, February 12, 1793.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> CELLINI, BENVENUTO. 1500-1571. Autograph Letter Signed ("Beto. Cellini"). [Florence, c.1566].
    <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> NAPOLEON BONAPARTE. Autograph Manuscript. [c.1795].
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> DICKENS, CHARLES. Great Expectations. London: Chapman and Hall, 1861.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> REED, JOHN. To the Honourable House of Representatives of the Freemen of Pennsylvania this Map of the City and Liberties of Phiadelphia With the Catalog of Purchasers is Humbly Dedicated.... [Philadelphia]: engraved by James Smit
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> ELIOT, THOMAS STEARNS. The Waste Land. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1922.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - April - 2006 Issue

Important Signed Documents and Autographs from The Raab Collection

Johnson

Thomas Johnson receives notice of appointment as sixth Supreme Court Justice from Thomas Jefferson.


Millard Fillmore is not one of America's most notable presidents, but this document touches on one of the nation's most notable miscalculations. After the Mexican War brought America large areas of new territory, it also created a major dilemma. Most in the North did not want to see slavery extended to the new territories, but the South, fearful that its influence in the government would diminish if new non-slave states were accepted, fought for the extension of slavery. However, this was effectively banned by the Missouri Compromise of 1820. The South wanted a new compromise that would allow for new slave states to be formed. At the time, President Zachary Taylor, a Louisianan and slaveholder himself, adamantly opposed the extension of slavery to new lands, and let the South know he would personally lead troops against it if the South attempted to secede. However, Taylor died in office in 1849, and was replaced by Vice-President Millard Fillmore, a northerner more accommodating to southern wishes than was southerner Taylor. The result was a series of compromises known as the Compromise of 1850, which Taylor vowed not to sign, but Fillmore supported. Among the accommodations made to the South was allowing for residents of the new territories to choose for themselves between slavery and freedom, and the passing of the Fugitive Slave Act, which enabled slave owners to pursue runaways into the free states. On May 9, 1851, Fillmore wrote to the city fathers of Lowell, Massachusetts, noting he could not accept an invitation to visit their city at the moment. He notes that duties require his presence in Washington at the time. He then goes on to say, in reference to the recent compromise, "I trust that the storm which threatened to overwhelm the government and array section against section and brother against brother in treasonable & fratricidal strife, has passed away." How wrong he was. The Compromise of 1850 may have provided temporary relief, but ultimately only exacerbated the problem, making the great conflict of a decade later almost inevitable. However, Fillmore did recognize that, despite the compromise, all was not secure. He then notes, "But the waters are still agitated and it will yet take some time for the elements to subside." We know now they never did. Fillmore's letter is item 12. $15,000.

For those looking for an autograph collection, here is an outstanding one. It belonged to Charles P. Davis, the publisher of those ubiquitous primary school publications generations were required to read, Current Events and My Weekly Reader. Among the signatures he collected were Presidents U.S. Grant, Grover Cleveland, Chester Arthur, and James Garfield, along with his assassin Charles Guiteau, poet Henry Longfellow, Generals Winfield Scott Hancock and Benjamin Butler, Confederate President Jefferson Davis and Vice-President Alexander Stephens, Admiral Peary, authors Charles Dickens, Julia Ward Howe, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, educator Booker T. Washington, Britain's Queen Victoria, industrialist John D. Rockefeller, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, abolitionist Senator Charles Sumner, showman P.T. Barnum, Mormon leader Brigham Young, cartoonist Thomas Nast, lead speaker at Gettysburg Edward Everett (Lincoln's was a secondary speech), and many others. Item 27. $6,000.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Announcing the Fall 2016 Auction Season
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b> 19th & 20th Century Literature
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Colored Plate Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Printed & Manuscript Americana
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Art, Press & Illustrated Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b> Illustration Art
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 3:</b> Old Master Through Modern Prints

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