• <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 372: Martin Luther King Jr. March for Freedom Now! Placard. Chicago, 1960. 28 x 22”. $3,000 to $6,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 567: Warhol, Andy. Tate Gallery Exhibition Booklet, Signed on the Cover by Warhol. Tate Gallery, 1971. $700 to $900
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 72: Mitchell, Margaret. <i>Gone With the Wind.</i> New York: The Macmillan Co., 1936. First edition, first issue. $4,000 to $5,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 468: Photo Archive Documenting the 1930s—50s Chicago Jazz and Night Club Scene. A significant collection. $2,000 to $4,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 143: Dr. Seuss. <i>Oh Say Can You Say.</i> 1979, First Edition, Signed. $200 to $300
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 285: [Maps] Thomas G. Bradford. <i>A Comprehensive Atlas, Geographical, Historical & Commercial.</i> Boston: William D. Ticknor, 1835. First Edition. $1,600 to $1,800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 69: Herman Melville. <i>Moby Dick, or The Whale</i>. New York: Random House, 1930. First Kent Trade Edition. $400 to $600
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 295: John James Audoban. Group of 148 Lithographs from the Birds of America. Philadelphia: J.T. Bowen, ca. 1840s. $600 to $800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 54: Langston Hughes. <i>One-Way Ticket.</i> New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1949. First edition. $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 7: Ray Bradbury. <i>The Martian Chronicles.</i> With a Wine Label Signed by Bradbury. Garden City: Doubleday, 1950. First edition $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 121. Frank L Baum. <i>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.</i> Chicago: George M. Hill Co., 1899, 1900. First Edition. $4,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 369. [Declaration of Independence] Peter Force Engraving of the Declaration of Independence. One page; 29 x 26”. From the "American Archives" 1837-1853 series of books. $15,000 to $20,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Luis de Lucena, <i>Arte de Ajedres,</i> first edition of the earliest extant manual on modern chess, Salamanca, circa 1496-97. Sold for $68,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Carte-de-visite album with 83 images of prominent African Americans & abolitionists, circa 1860s. Sold for $47,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> Vienna & Leipzig, 1918. Sold for $106,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Man Ray, <i>[London Transport] – Keeps London Going,</i> 1938. Sold for $149,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Thomas Jefferson, Letter Signed, to Major-General Nathanael Greene, promising reinforcements against Cornwallis, 1781. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Nicolas de Fer, <i>L’Amerique Divisee Selon Letendue de ses Principales Parties,</i> Paris, 1713. Sold for $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Russell H. Tandy, <i>The Secret in the Old Attic,</i> watercolor, pencil & ink, 1944. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ernest Hemingway, <i>Three Stories & Ten Poems,</i> first edition of the author's first book, Paris, 1923. Sold for $23,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Walker Evans, <i>River Rouge Plant,</i> silver print, 1947. Sold for $57,500.
  • <b>Skinner: Early English Books<br>A Single Owner Sale. July 20, 2018</b>
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Cranmer, Thomas (1489-1556). <i>Catechismus, That is to Say, a Shorte Instruction into Christian Religion...</i> London, 1548. First edition. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Donne, John (1572-1631). <i>Pseudo-Martyr.</i> London: Printed by W[illiam] Stansby for Walter Burre, 1610. First edition. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Fletcher, Giles (1549?-1611). <i>The Russe Common Wealth, or Maner of Gouernement by the Russe Emperour…</i> London, 1591. First edition. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Gabelkover, Oswald (1539-1616). <i>The Boock of Physicke.</i> Dordrecht: Isaack Caen, 1599. First edition. $12,000 to $15,000
    <b>Skinner: Early English Books<br>A Single Owner Sale. July 20, 2018</b>
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Galileo, Galilei (1564-1642) trans. Thomas Salusbury (d. 1666). <i>Mathematical Collections and Translations the First Tome.</i> London, 1661. First edition of Galileo's works in English. $35,000 to $50,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Higden, Ranulphus (d. 1364). <i>Polycronicon.</i> Translated by John Trevisa, with the 1357-1460 <i>Continuation</i> by William Caxton. Southwark, 1527. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Randolph, Bernard (b. 1643). <i>The Present State of the Morea, Called Anciently Peloponnesus…</i> London, 1689. [Bound with] <i>The Present State of the Islands of the Archipelago…</i> $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> <i>The Great Herball Newly Corrected.</i> London, 1539. Folio, ESTC lists three U.S. copies; the last copy offered at auction was incomplete and sold in 1949. $25,000 to $35,000

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - October - 2017 Issue

The William Reese Company Revisits the Thomas Streeter Americana Sale of 1967-69

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Streeter revisted.

The William Reese Company has issued a catalogue that will appeal to anyone who loves printed Americana. The title is The Streeter Sale Revisited, Fifty Years Later. Thomas W. Streeter, Reese says without exaggeration, "was the foremost collector of Americana in the 20th century." A lawyer and businessman, Streeter began collecting books in his 30s. At age 56, he retired from other pursuits to devote the remainder of his life to collecting books and writing about them and about his collection. Americana was his subject, with Texas being a specialty within this specialty. He had by far the greatest collection in those specialties during his lifetime, which concluded in 1965 at the age of 82.

 

After completing his great bibliography of early Texana, Streeter sold his complete Texas collection to Yale University. Other portions were given to various institutions. However, he retained his main Americana collection for the rest of his life. He planned for it to be sold at auction, and prepared for that auction, but had no intention of sticking around to see it. One imagines that would have been too painful. So, the sale came after he died. Still, the descriptions used were primarily those had had prepared in advance. The Streeter Sale was conducted by Parke-Bernet, America's foremost auction house at the time, running for 21 sessions over three years, from 1966-1969. When finished, it was the highest grossing book sale ever in America, bringing in slightly over $3.1 million. Streeter provided an unusual bonus to certain institutions. He gave them a combined $400,000 in credits that had to be used at his sale. Nevertheless, most of the material in his collection went to private collectors and booksellers, leaving a trail of records in later years with which to follow the journey of his books.

 

Reese has done just that wherever possible. He has kept a record of to whom Streeter's items were sold, wherever that was obtainable, and subsequent sales of Streeter's material whenever such information is available. That provides a fascinating addition to the descriptions in this catalogue. Reese also provides the sale prices at the Streeter sale, and of subsequent sales when that is available. Most of the books in this catalogue were not Streeter's personal copies, but all are of titles sold in the Streeter sale. The catalogue does note when an item in it was actually Streeter's copy. It does mean that everything in here was deemed of at least sufficient significance for Streeter to believe they were worthy of a great collection. Here are a few.

 

For most explorers that came to the America, the continent was a place to search for riches, create settlements, or just to learn what was there. For a few, however, America was just an obstacle. Greater trade was taking place between Europe and Asia, but to reach those markets, sailors had to go from the northern continent of Europe, all the way south of South America or Africa to make the long journey. The trip would be so much shorter if they could essentially go due west. However, North America stood in the way. Nevertheless, they believed a shorter route could be found by sailing along the north side of the continent, the legendary Northwest Passage. Many figured there must be a way from the southern inlet, Hudson Bay, to the Pacific along the north side of the continent. During the 17th century, explorers had already concluded such did not exist. Explorations ceased until Arthur Dobbs, unconvinced, financed a voyage led by Captain William Moor. Item 62 is an account of that attempt, A Voyage to Hudson's-Bay, by the Dobbs Galley and California, in the Years 1746 and 1747, for Discovering a North West Passage... The author was Henry Ellis, the mission's surveyor and hydrographer, published in 1748. He first recounts the many previous attempts before describing his own. Ultimately, it too failed. There is no Northwest Passage from Hudson Bay, and the more northerly route finally discovered a century and a half later is too shallow, and frozen too long, to be of any practical use. Priced at $1,750.

 

"Four score and seven years ago..." We all know those words, taken from one of the greatest speeches ever given. It's appeal is in its moving words and mercifully short duration. More about that later. Item 130 is the first appearance in book form of the Gettysburg Address. Published in 1843, the title is An Oration Delivered on the Battlefield of Gettysburg... by Edward Everett. Edward Everett? Wasn't it somebody else...? There is, of course, something more than a printer's error here. The main address that afternoon was given by Senator Edward Everett, a rambling affair that last one and a half to two hours. It wasn't until later that people realized that Abraham Lincoln said more to reach people's hearts in his few brief words than did Everett, though the latter was noted as a gifted orator. Even he immediately realized that he blew it. Thankfully, Lincoln's brief words also appear in this 48-page booklet, on page 40. $40,000.

 

Now, here's a word from the other side. Item 44 is the rare third and final draft of the Confederate Constitution. Not all of the southern states had yet seceded when a convention was called on February 4, 1861, in Montgomery, Alabama, to form a new government. It was patterned on the U. S. Constitution, with adjustments, of course, more suitable to the South. There is more in the way of states' rights, even allowing the individual states to maintain their own armies and navies. No internal improvements to facilitate commerce could be undertaken by the Confederate government, presidents would serve a single six-year term, and the President was granted a line item veto. American presidents would love that one. Not surprisingly, it includes a provision barring the adoption of any law prohibiting "the right of property in negro slaves." Presumably, laws could be passed prohibiting white slavery. The first two drafts of the Confederate Constitution were meant to be working copies, with space between lines for corrections, while this was the final document. The caption title reads, In Congress – March 9, 1861 – Amended Constitution – 100 Copies Ordered to Be Printed. Constitution of the Confederate States of America. Of the presumed 100 copies printed, only five are still known. $175,000.

 

Item 76 is sheet music for the 1864 song Idaho. This ode describes the Idaho Gold Rush, and I will admit I never knew before there was a gold rush in Idaho. Sing along, if you know the tune:

 

"They say there is a land,

Where crystal waters flow,

O'er beds of quarts [sic] and purest gold,

Way out in Idaho...

We'll need to pick or spade,

No shovel, pan, or hoe,

The largest chunks are 'top a ground.,

Way out in Idaho..."

 

What a surprise it must have been when the prospectors realized those "gold" nuggets were really potatoes. The author of this song was Frank French, or maybe French Frank. $1,250.

 

William Henry Harrison was an American diplomat in 1829, and not a very diplomatic one. Harrison was appointed ambassador to Colombia in 1828, and soon managed to get himself into a battle with the George Washington of South America, Simon Bolivar. Not diplomatic at all. Harrison concluded that Bolivar was trying to become the Napoleon of South America, to make an emperor of himself and unwisely got himself too closely involved with opposing factions. Harrison wrote Bolivar a letter urging him to adhere to the principles of Republican government. That was out of line. Bolivar responded, calling Harrison a "dotard." Not really. However, his supporters were deeply offended. Fortunately, President Jackson had already sent a new ambassador to replace Harrison, who arrived the next day. The following year, Harrison published this book to justify his conduct: Remarks of General Harrison, Late Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to the Republic of Colombia, on Certain Charges Made Against Him by that Government. In fairness to Harrison, Bolivar had earlier seized some dictatorial powers for himself, though it was more an attempt to keep the country from disintegrating among competing factions than to become an emperor. Harrison would be elected President of the United States a decade later, his only notable accomplishment being to die in office a few weeks later, achieving nothing other than making the unqualified John Tyler President for the next 3 years and 11 months. Another bad move. Item 87. $1,000.

 

The William Reese Company may be reached at 203-789-8081 or amorder@reeseco.com. Their website is www.williamreesecompany.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Zane Grey, Inscribed photograph album depicting Grey and party at Catalina, fishing, and in Arizona. $700 to $1,000
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Eric Taverner, Salmon Fishing...London: Seeley, Service & Co., 1931. $600 to $900
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> The Gentleman Angler. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Ken Robinson, Flyfishers' Progress. [London: The Flyfishers' Club, 2000. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> G. H. Lacy, North Punjab Fishing Club Angler's Handbook. Calcutta: Newman & Co., 1890. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> J. Harrington Keene, Fly-Fishing and Fly-Making for Trout, etc. New York, 1887. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Arthur Macrate, The History of The Tuna Club, Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, California, 1948. $400 to $600
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Joseph D. Bates Jr. Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing. Harrisburg, PA: The Stackpole Company, 1966. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Paul Schmookler and Ingrid V. Sils. Rare and Unusual Fly Tying Materials: A Natural History. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Herbert Hoover, Fishing For Fun - And To Wash Your Soul. New York: Random House, 1963. $400 to $600
  • <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>The Tragedie of Julius Caesar.</i> London, 1623. 1st appearance in print, Complete from the First Folio. Sold for $175,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Ernst, Max. <i>Mr. Knife and Miss Fork</i>. Paris, 1932. DELUXE EDITION. Sold for $15,625
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Cage, John. Autograph musical leaf from his Concert for Piano and Orchestra, NY, 1958. Sold for $18,750
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Einstein, Albert. Signed Passport Photo for his US citizenship application. Bermuda, 1935. Sold for $17,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Verard, Antoine. Illuminated printed Book of Hours. Paris, 1507. Sold for $7,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Wetterkurzschlussel. German Weather Report Codebook - for Enigma use. Berlin, 1942. Sold for $225,000
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Morelos y Pavon, Jose Maria. Autograph letter signed to El Virrey Venegas, February 5, 1812. Sold for $6,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Milne, A.A. Complete set of <i>Winnie-the-Pooh</i> books. 4 volumes. All first issue points. London, 1924-1928. Sold for $5,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> A 48-star American Flag, battle worn flown at Guadalcanal and Peleliu, 1942-1944. Sold for $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Locke, John. Autograph Letter Signed mourning the death of his friend, William Molyneaux, 2 pp, October 27, 1698. Sold for $20,000

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