• <b>Skinner: Early English Books<br>A Single Owner Sale. July 20, 2018</b>
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Cranmer, Thomas (1489-1556). <i>Catechismus, That is to Say, a Shorte Instruction into Christian Religion...</i> London, 1548. First edition. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Donne, John (1572-1631). <i>Pseudo-Martyr.</i> London: Printed by W[illiam] Stansby for Walter Burre, 1610. First edition. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Fletcher, Giles (1549?-1611). <i>The Russe Common Wealth, or Maner of Gouernement by the Russe Emperour…</i> London, 1591. First edition. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Gabelkover, Oswald (1539-1616). <i>The Boock of Physicke.</i> Dordrecht: Isaack Caen, 1599. First edition. $12,000 to $15,000
    <b>Skinner: Early English Books<br>A Single Owner Sale. July 20, 2018</b>
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Galileo, Galilei (1564-1642) trans. Thomas Salusbury (d. 1666). <i>Mathematical Collections and Translations the First Tome.</i> London, 1661. First edition of Galileo's works in English. $35,000 to $50,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Higden, Ranulphus (d. 1364). <i>Polycronicon.</i> Translated by John Trevisa, with the 1357-1460 <i>Continuation</i> by William Caxton. Southwark, 1527. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Randolph, Bernard (b. 1643). <i>The Present State of the Morea, Called Anciently Peloponnesus…</i> London, 1689. [Bound with] <i>The Present State of the Islands of the Archipelago…</i> $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> <i>The Great Herball Newly Corrected.</i> London, 1539. Folio, ESTC lists three U.S. copies; the last copy offered at auction was incomplete and sold in 1949. $25,000 to $35,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Luis de Lucena, <i>Arte de Ajedres,</i> first edition of the earliest extant manual on modern chess, Salamanca, circa 1496-97. Sold for $68,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Carte-de-visite album with 83 images of prominent African Americans & abolitionists, circa 1860s. Sold for $47,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> Vienna & Leipzig, 1918. Sold for $106,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Man Ray, <i>[London Transport] – Keeps London Going,</i> 1938. Sold for $149,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Thomas Jefferson, Letter Signed, to Major-General Nathanael Greene, promising reinforcements against Cornwallis, 1781. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Nicolas de Fer, <i>L’Amerique Divisee Selon Letendue de ses Principales Parties,</i> Paris, 1713. Sold for $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Russell H. Tandy, <i>The Secret in the Old Attic,</i> watercolor, pencil & ink, 1944. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ernest Hemingway, <i>Three Stories & Ten Poems,</i> first edition of the author's first book, Paris, 1923. Sold for $23,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Walker Evans, <i>River Rouge Plant,</i> silver print, 1947. Sold for $57,500.
  • <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Zane Grey, Inscribed photograph album depicting Grey and party at Catalina, fishing, and in Arizona. $700 to $1,000
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Eric Taverner, Salmon Fishing...London: Seeley, Service & Co., 1931. $600 to $900
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> The Gentleman Angler. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Ken Robinson, Flyfishers' Progress. [London: The Flyfishers' Club, 2000. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> G. H. Lacy, North Punjab Fishing Club Angler's Handbook. Calcutta: Newman & Co., 1890. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> J. Harrington Keene, Fly-Fishing and Fly-Making for Trout, etc. New York, 1887. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Arthur Macrate, The History of The Tuna Club, Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, California, 1948. $400 to $600
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Joseph D. Bates Jr. Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing. Harrisburg, PA: The Stackpole Company, 1966. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Paul Schmookler and Ingrid V. Sils. Rare and Unusual Fly Tying Materials: A Natural History. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Herbert Hoover, Fishing For Fun - And To Wash Your Soul. New York: Random House, 1963. $400 to $600
  • <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 372: Martin Luther King Jr. March for Freedom Now! Placard. Chicago, 1960. 28 x 22”. $3,000 to $6,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 567: Warhol, Andy. Tate Gallery Exhibition Booklet, Signed on the Cover by Warhol. Tate Gallery, 1971. $700 to $900
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 72: Mitchell, Margaret. <i>Gone With the Wind.</i> New York: The Macmillan Co., 1936. First edition, first issue. $4,000 to $5,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 468: Photo Archive Documenting the 1930s—50s Chicago Jazz and Night Club Scene. A significant collection. $2,000 to $4,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 143: Dr. Seuss. <i>Oh Say Can You Say.</i> 1979, First Edition, Signed. $200 to $300
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 285: [Maps] Thomas G. Bradford. <i>A Comprehensive Atlas, Geographical, Historical & Commercial.</i> Boston: William D. Ticknor, 1835. First Edition. $1,600 to $1,800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 69: Herman Melville. <i>Moby Dick, or The Whale</i>. New York: Random House, 1930. First Kent Trade Edition. $400 to $600
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 295: John James Audoban. Group of 148 Lithographs from the Birds of America. Philadelphia: J.T. Bowen, ca. 1840s. $600 to $800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 54: Langston Hughes. <i>One-Way Ticket.</i> New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1949. First edition. $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 7: Ray Bradbury. <i>The Martian Chronicles.</i> With a Wine Label Signed by Bradbury. Garden City: Doubleday, 1950. First edition $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 121. Frank L Baum. <i>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.</i> Chicago: George M. Hill Co., 1899, 1900. First Edition. $4,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 369. [Declaration of Independence] Peter Force Engraving of the Declaration of Independence. One page; 29 x 26”. From the "American Archives" 1837-1853 series of books. $15,000 to $20,000

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - July - 2017 Issue

Easter Island (Rapa Nui) from Kainbacher Rare Books

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Rapa Nui/Easter Island.

Kainbacher Rare Books has issued their Catalogue XII, Rapa Nui, Easter Island, Osterinsel. Those are all names for the same place, the Pacific Island now part of Chile over 1,000 miles from anywhere else. Most in the West still know it as Easter Island, which is in turn famous for its giant stone statues of heads (moai). There are hundreds of them on the island, their purpose long a mystery.

 

Easter Island is believed to have been settled about 1,000-1,500 years ago, most likely by very skillful seafaring Polynesians. What led them to make this long journey in their primitive boats is unknown. It is believed several hundred years later, or about 500 years before first visited by Europeans, they began carving and then moving these enormously heavy stone heads to various places on the island. They appear to be representatives of ancestors, whom the islanders believed looked out for their interests from above. It looks to have been an idyllic place, beautiful forests, numerous native animals, and a peaceful community.

 

Unfortunately, by around 1500, the population rising to 15,000, the island could no longer sustain such a large population. The people stopped looking to ancestors so much but to the strongest members of society, selected through competitions. The forests disappeared, food became less plentiful, life was not quite so beautiful. Still, they lived a peaceful existence when the island was first discovered by Europeans in 1722. The first Europeans to arrive were led by Dutch navigator Jacob Roggeveen. He landed on Easter Day, hence the island's name. No one returned until a Spanish visit in 1770, followed by Captain James Cook's visit during the second of his three voyages, in 1774. Cook said the island was nothing like the one Roggeveen had described half a century earlier. Natives were few, water scarce, food probably only enough for those who lived there, not for visitors. Cook noted that by then, some of the statues had been toppled. There was fighting going on between clans as inhabitants battled for scarce resources. Paradise was deteriorating rapidly.

 

There would be several visits over the next century as the situation continued to decline. Then, the visitors made the bad situation much worse. In 1862, Peruvian slave traders struck, abducting 1,500 people, half of the island's remaining population. Then, the missionaries came. They were well-meaning, but wiped out most of the natives' culture and buried their history. They were taught to be European Christians, not Rapa Nui people. The slavers were later forced to repatriate surviving abductees, but they brought back smallpox and other diseases with them, wiping out large sections of the remaining population. Missionaries evacuated some of the survivors to Tahiti, and at the low point, only 111 people remained. The island has since rebuilt its population, but many are immigrants, the culture totally changed.

 

Kainbacher's catalogue is not at all what you normally expect from a bookseller. It contains four sections, three being guest articles pertaining to Easter Island presented by scholars. Only the second section offers books for purchase. These are historic accounts from the various visits by Europeans, Chileans and Americans who came to the island between 1722 and the early 20th century. These are critical works to forming a collection about this isolated, wondrous place whose giant stone heads have made it famous throughout the world, despite its small size and extreme isolation. Here are a few samples.

 

Carl Friedrich Behrens was the first European to set foot on Easter Island. He came with Roggeveen's expedition, which was searching for Terra Australis, the imagined great southern continent, or Davis Land for a sailor who thought he spotted its edge. Behrens was a corporal, in charge of the soldiers on the expedition, taken along to protect the others. In 1737, he published an account of the journey, which includes a section on their visit to Easter Island. Their visit was brief, and Roggeveen apparently never stepped on the island himself, but Behrens provides us with an interesting account of the people and their customs, as best he could understand them since they did not speak the same language. Several islanders were killed by the Dutch, either by accident or misunderstanding, but while that made them more nervous, the Rapa Nui remained friendly to their guests. It would be almost half a century before they had any more. Offered is a copy of the 1739 French translation entitled Histoire de L'Expédition de Trois Vaisseaux. Priced at €11,500 (euros, or about $12,868 in U.S. currency).

 

Next we have Reise um die Welt, an account of Cook's second voyage, by Georg Forster, the German edition published 1778-1780. Forster, and his father Johann Reinhold Forster, were naturalists on Cook's second expedition. They were among those on the voyage who went ashore to explore Easter Island. The Forsters spent around a week on the island, and inquired of the natives what the stone statues were. They guessed them to be monuments to some kings. Forster noted that they must be remnants of better times. €5,500 (US $6,155).

 

The United States finally got around to conducting an exploration of Easter Island in 1886. Under prodding from the Smithsonian, the Navy sent the ship Mohican to Easter Island, a warship that was plying Pacific waters to protect American interests. She spent a month there gathering information. This catalogue offers three reports on this expedition, including Te Pito te Henua. Known as Rapa Nui; Commonly Called Easter Island... by George H. Cooke, published in 1897. Cooke was the surgeon on the Mohican. €900 (US $1,007).

 

Walter Knoche was sent to Easter Island by Chile, which now controlled the territory, in 1911 to set up a meteorological and seismic monitoring station. He spent time learning what he could about the island and its culture. Fortunately, he was able to find two elderly residents who could recall times before the missionaries arrived in 1864. From them he was able to learn about traditional religious rites, myths, music and dance, and other native customs. It was a last chance to record old traditions that had been driven away when the country became Christian. His book, not published until 1925, is titled Die Osterinsel. €9,500 (US $10,631).

 

Three years after Knoche, Katherine Routledge and her husband landed on the island. They were sailing in a private yacht but holed up on Easter Island for 15 months to avoid sailing home through the dangers of sea battles during the First World War. Mrs. Routledge thoroughly researched the island and wrote about it in this book, The Mystery of Easter Island. The Story of an Expedition, published in 1919. Though only three years behind Knoche, both of the old-timers he interviewed had since died. However, she found some older residents in a leper colony still had tattoos, later suppressed by the missionaries, that corresponded to designs carved on the backs of some of the statues. She was able to record some of the passed down oral accounts of pre-missionary times even though the living witnesses were now gone. €750 (US $839).

 

Antiquariat Kainbacher can be reached at 0043-(0)699-110 19 221 or paul.kainbacher@kabsi.at. Their website is found at www.antiquariat-kainbacher.at.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>The Tragedie of Julius Caesar.</i> London, 1623. 1st appearance in print, Complete from the First Folio. Sold for $175,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Ernst, Max. <i>Mr. Knife and Miss Fork</i>. Paris, 1932. DELUXE EDITION. Sold for $15,625
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Cage, John. Autograph musical leaf from his Concert for Piano and Orchestra, NY, 1958. Sold for $18,750
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Einstein, Albert. Signed Passport Photo for his US citizenship application. Bermuda, 1935. Sold for $17,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Verard, Antoine. Illuminated printed Book of Hours. Paris, 1507. Sold for $7,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Wetterkurzschlussel. German Weather Report Codebook - for Enigma use. Berlin, 1942. Sold for $225,000
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Morelos y Pavon, Jose Maria. Autograph letter signed to El Virrey Venegas, February 5, 1812. Sold for $6,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Milne, A.A. Complete set of <i>Winnie-the-Pooh</i> books. 4 volumes. All first issue points. London, 1924-1928. Sold for $5,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> A 48-star American Flag, battle worn flown at Guadalcanal and Peleliu, 1942-1944. Sold for $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Locke, John. Autograph Letter Signed mourning the death of his friend, William Molyneaux, 2 pp, October 27, 1698. Sold for $20,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>

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