• <b>Results from Bonhams’ sale of <i>Fine Books & Manuscripts Featuring Exploration and Travel</i></b>
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Columbus. De Insulis nuper in mari Indico repertis. Basel, 1494. SOLD for $751,500
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Cook in Tahiti. [Playbill]. [Germany, c.1840.] SOLD for $6,250
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Aa, Pieter van der. Naaukeurige versameling der gedenk-waardigste zee en land-reysen. Leyden, 1706-8. SOLD for $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Dürer. Underweysung der messung [and two more]. Nuremberg, 1525-8. SOLD for $175,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Cortes, Hernan. A Pleito signed by Antonio de Mendoza in the case of Hernan Cortes. 1542. SOLD for $8750
    <b>Results from Bonhams’ <i>The Air and Space Sale</i></b>
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Russian Kholod 5D67 HFL Rocket Engine. SOLD for $25,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Neil Armstrong Apollo Era Training Glove. SOLD for $50,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Full Scale Sputnik-1 EMC/EMI Lab Model. SOLD for $847,500
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> SOLRAD GREB Spy Satellite Engineering Dummy. SOLD for $10,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Soviet LK-3 Lunar Lander Model. SOLD for $25,000
  • <b>Sotheby’s London: Fine Autograph Letters and Manuscripts from a Distinguished Private Collection. Part I: Music. 26 October 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Beethoven, Ludwig van. Autograph Manuscript of the Canon "Ewig Dein" Woo 161, signed at the end ("...[Ewig] Dein...Freund Ludwig Van Beethowen"). Est. £120,000 to £150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Brahms, Johannes. Autograph Manuscript of the "Geistliches Wiegenlied", Op.91 No.2, for Contralto, Viola And Piano, the original version of 1864, signed and inscribed at the end by the composer. Est. £200,000 to £250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Chopin, Frédéric. Autograph Manuscript of the Opening of the Étude Op.25 No.2, in A-Flat Major, signed and dated ("Paris Ce 28 Avril F. Chopin"). Est. £100,000 to £150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London: Fine Autograph Letters and Manuscripts from a Distinguished Private Collection. Part I: Music. 26 October 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Haydn, Joseph. Autograph Letter Signed ("Jos Haydn[Paraph]"), to the Baden Choirmaster Anton Stoll, 30 July 1802. Est. £20,000 to £30,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Verdi, Giuseppe. Autograph Working Manuscript of a scene from Ernani. Est. £100,000 to £150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Verdi, Giuseppe. Highly Important Series of Thirty-Six Autograph Letters Signed to The Librettist Salvadore Cammarano, written between 1844 And 1851, the greater part unpublished and unrecorded. Est. £250,000 to £300,000
  • <b>Announcing a new Books for Sale platform hosted by Biblio!</b>
    <b>List your books simultaneously on Rare Book Hub and Biblio!</b>
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b><br><i>The Centenary Edition of the Works of Ian Fleming</i>, one of 26 lettered sets, 18 volumes, London, 2008. $25,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> William Faulkner, <i>The Marble Faun</i>, first edition, signed & inscribed to Dorothy Wilcox by Faulkner & Phil Stone, Boston, 1924. $18,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Maurice Sendak, <i>Where the Wild Things Are</i>, first edition, signed & inscribed to William Archibald, New York, 1963. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Anne Frank, <i>Het Achterhuis</i>, first edition, in first state jacket, Amsterdam, 1947. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Roald Dahl, <i>Charlie and the Chocolate Factory</i>, first edition, signed, New York, 1964. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b><br>Ray Bradbury, <i>Fahrenheit 451</i>, first limited edition bound in Johns-Manville Quinterra, New York, 1953. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Benjamin Graham, <i>The Intelligent Investor</i>, first edition, in original dust jacket, New York, 1949. $4,500 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Anna Sewell, <i>Black Beauty</i>, first edition, inscribed, London, 1877. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Arthur Conan Doyle, <i>A Study in Scarlet</i>, first American edition, Philadelphia, 1890. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> James Fenimore Cooper, <i>The Last of the Mohicans</i>, first edition, two volumes, Philadelphia, 1826. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Amelia Earhart, <i>20 hrs. 40 mins. Our Flight in Friendship</i>, limited first edition, signed, New York, 1928. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Philip K. Dick, <i>World of Chance</i>, first edition, signed, London, 1956. $3,000 to $4,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - September - 2015 Issue

Diversity and the Unusual from W. C. Baker's First Catalogue

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Catalog One from W. C. Baker.

This month we review the first catalogue from W. C. Baker Rare Books and Ephemera. Last month we wrote about Will Baker's return to full-time bookselling from the Pittsburgh-Cleveland area (click here). This month we take a look at Baker's first catalogue, appropriately titled Catalog One. Baker describes it as "a selection of unusual printed and manuscript works relating to magic, medicine, museums, religion, science, the stage, and other diverse subjects." What we find is indeed a diverse selection of works, with many of them at least bordering on the unusual. Here are a few samples.

 

Thomas Paine was one of America's founders, his Common Sense being an inspiration for the revolution that set the nation free. And yet, by the end of his life, Paine was a pariah in the land he helped free, no one even willing to accept his body for burial. Such was the dark side of religion. The cause of Paine's fall was his unwillingness to accept revealed religion, the Bible, Christianity. Most considered Paine an atheist, though this was not accurate. He was more a Deist, a believer in one God who believed that God's nature could be understood through reason, not books or words uttered by man. By the middle of the 19th century, some were calling to rehabilitate Paine, considering him a good man, even if mistaken in some beliefs. Attempts at rehabilitation fell hand in hand with the spiritualist movement centered in mid-century Rochester, New York, in this book by Charles Hammond, a Universalist minister who became a spiritual medium: Light from the Spirit World. The Pilgrimage of Thomas Paine, and Others, to the Seventh Circle of the Spirit World, published in 1852. Hammond allegedly spoke with the deceased Paine and others, and listened in on their conversations. What we find is that Paine is now doing well in the after-world, despite his prior beliefs that many thought would condemn him to Hell. Sure, Paine made some mistakes on Earth – who hasn't? - but where he was mistaken, he acknowledges his errors, and all's well that ends well. This conclusion is certainly consistent with Hammond's Universalist faith, and hopefully all has ended well for this great American patriot, but one suspects Hammond's conversations with Paine were more in his imagination than in the world of spirits. Item 31. Priced at $300.

 

While Paine had few takers for his radical thoughts, the religion of America's Puritan founders had swung decidedly more liberal at the end of the 18th century, breaking off into Unitarian and Congregationalist wings. Even the more traditional Congregationalists had become too liberal for some, and a more orthodox wing at Harvard broke away to found Andover Seminary. Item 4 is an attack on this group in an 1826 broadside from Boston headed The Moloch of Orthodoxy. The "Moloch of Orthodoxy" is the the writer's description of the breakaway group's vision of God. The writer describes this orthodox God as "delighting in the eternal damnation of myriads of human beings and to glut his devilish appetite, has fore-ordained from all eternity, that a certain number of the human race shall writhe and gnash their teeth in eternal agonies, plunged in a burning pool of liquid fire; and not because they were more wicked than the rest of mankind, but because it is his SOVEREIGN WILL." $750.

 

This is all getting very heavy, so let's move to some lighter fare – Linus the Wonder Horse. Item 48 is a broadside promoting an exhibition of Linus, headed 15,000 People have seen Linus The Horse With the Long Mane and Tail! Long, indeed. The mane was 14 feet long with several feet dragging on the ground. It is a wonder the wonder horse wasn't constantly tripping over his mane. The hair on his tail extended 12 feet. Linus was supposedly descended from a breed known as the Oregon Long-Haired Wild Wonder Horses, though later historians believe they were the offspring of selective breeding, sort of like Clydesdales. Considering the showmanship of the day, one wonders whether Linus was faked, perhaps his mane filled with mane extensions, but it appears he was as hairy as represented. Perhaps the selective breeding had a downside, as it often does, as Linus died in 1894 at the age of just 10. There was a Linus II, but this broadside is for the original Linus, as it promoted an appearance in Maine in 1891 for the "Samson among Equines." You can find pictures of Linus and a few other Oregon Wonder Horses online, and if you want to remember the mane, you will have to view these pictures. Somehow in the ensuing years, the breed died out. $125.

 

I can believe that Oregon Long-Haired Wonder Horses existed, but am more dubious about the existence of the creature described in The Old Whig: or, the Consistent Protestant. Thursday, November 10, 1737. Some fishermen brought their net ashore, and when opened, "to their great Surprize, a Creature of human Shape, having two Legs, leaped out of the Net, and ran away with great Swiftness..." No wonder they were surprized. Unable to overtake the creature, they threw sticks at it. When they caught up, it groaned like a human, keeled over and died. It had webbed feet, facial features resembling a human, and a tail like a salmon along with its two feet. It was four feet tall. It was exhibited in Exeter and London, and reportedly Horace Walpole, son of the Prime Minister, viewed the creature. Item 59. $200.

 

Item 83 is "The Last Writing" of Marion Ira Stout; Containing His Confession... Stout left his last writing behind in his cell when he unsuccessfully attempted suicide a few days before his execution. Stout was convicted for the terribly botched murder of his brother-in-law, Charles Littles. Conspiring with his sister, Sarah, to lure Littles to a cliff, Stout hit his in-law in the head with a hammer and pushed him over the edge. The intention was that Littles would fall into a river below and be carried away. However, the body did not reach the river, so Stout proceeded down the sharp slope to complete the job. He fell to a ledge below, breaking his arm. It was the same ledge where Littles' body had fallen. Stout cried out to his sister, who came to rescue him, only falling to the same ledge herself, breaking her wrist. Still, they managed to push Littles' body off the ledge, only to have it come to rest on the river bank. Stout was quickly arrested, tried for murder, convicted, and sentenced to death. Still, despite his obvious guilt, Stout had some notable defenders. He otherwise seemed a nice enough guy, and many believed he was trying to save his sister from a drunken, philandering, abusive husband (others believed his motivation was incest). Among those to speak out for Stout were Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass. It was to no avail, and in a horrible conclusion, the execution was as botched as the murder, the hangman's rope failing to break Stout's neck and leaving him struggling for 20 minutes before dying. Sarah got seven years in Sing Sing prison. $450.

 

W. C. Baker Rare Books and Ephemera may be reached at 203-752-7410 or will@wcbaker.com. Their website is www.wcbaker.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Exodus 10:10 to 16:15. Complete Biblical scroll sheet in Hebrew, a Torah scroll panel. Middle East, ca. 10th or 11th century.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Copernicus Refuted. (Astronomy.). Scientific manuscript of a course of studies at Collège de la Trinité, Lyon. 1660s.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Israel’s War of Independence and the Early Days of the IDF. 58 photographs presented to Israel Ber, IDF officer and later convicted spy.
    <b>19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Early Unpublished Darwin letter on the races of man. Autograph Letter Signed [to Henry Denny]. Down, Kent, June 1, [1844].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Classic Image of American Slavery. Kimball, M. H. <i>Emancipated Slaves</i>. New York: George Hanks, 1863.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> (Underground Railroad.) Scaggs, Isaac. Important Runaway Slave Poster: $500 Reward Ran away, or decoyed from the subscriber…
  • <b>Sotheby’s Paris: Books & Manuscripts. 30 October 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> MARCEL PROUST. Du côté de chez Swann. Grasset, 1913. First edition. One of 5 copies on Japan paper, inscribed by the author to Louis Brun. Est. €400,000 - 600,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> Saint-Exupéry. <i>25 Autograph Illustrated Letters to his Friend Charles Sallès</i>. Est. €30,000-50,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> French Revolution, 1793. Déclaration des droits de l’Homme. 2,55 x 1,30m. A monumental wallpaper poster of the 1793 version, with hand-colored highlights. Unique copy. Est. €100,000 - 150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> GIAMBATTISTA PIRANESI. <i>Vedute di Roma</i>, 1748-1775. 107 etchings. An exceptional copy, printed and bound before 1780. Est. €50,000 - 80,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> Picasso, Pablo -- Fernando de Rojas. LA CÉLESTINE. [PARIS, EDITIONS DE L'ATELIER CROMMELYNCK, 1971.] One of the 30 copies hors commerce (n° X). 66 original etchings by Picasso. Signed. Est. €30,000 - €35,000
  • <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Magnificent Botanical Library of D. F. Allen. October 26, 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Redouté, Pierre Joseph, and Claude Antoine Thory. <i>Les Roses</I>. Paris: Firmin Didot, 1817–1824. Est. $225,000 to $325,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Trew, Jakob Christoph. <i>Hortus Nitidissimis Omnen Per Annum Superbiens Floribus</i>… Nuremberg: Johann Joseph Fleischmann, 1750 [–1786]. Est. $200,000 to $300,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Trew, Christoph Jakob, and Benedict Christian Vogel. <i>Plantæ Selectæ</i>…[Nuremberg:] 1750–1773; Supplement, [Augsburg:] 1790 [–1792]. Est. $200,000 to $300,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Magnificent Botanical Library of D. F. Allen. October 26, 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Jacquin, Nikolaus Joseph von. <i>Plantarum Rariorum Horti Caesarei Schönbrunnensis Descriptiones Et Icones.</i>Vienna; London; Leiden, 1797–1804. Est. $180,000 to $250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Weinmann, Johann Wilhelm. <i>Phytanthoza Iconographia; Sive Conspectus Aliquot Millium, Tam Indigenarum Quam Exoticarum</i>… Regensburg, 1735–1737–1745. Est. $120,000 to $180,000

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