• <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Magnificent Botanical Library of D. F. Allen. October 26, 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Redouté, Pierre Joseph, and Claude Antoine Thory. <i>Les Roses</I>. Paris: Firmin Didot, 1817–1824. Est. $225,000 to $325,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Trew, Jakob Christoph. <i>Hortus Nitidissimis Omnen Per Annum Superbiens Floribus</i>… Nuremberg: Johann Joseph Fleischmann, 1750 [–1786]. Est. $200,000 to $300,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Trew, Christoph Jakob, and Benedict Christian Vogel. <i>Plantæ Selectæ</i>…[Nuremberg:] 1750–1773; Supplement, [Augsburg:] 1790 [–1792]. Est. $200,000 to $300,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Magnificent Botanical Library of D. F. Allen. October 26, 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Jacquin, Nikolaus Joseph von. <i>Plantarum Rariorum Horti Caesarei Schönbrunnensis Descriptiones Et Icones.</i>Vienna; London; Leiden, 1797–1804. Est. $180,000 to $250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Weinmann, Johann Wilhelm. <i>Phytanthoza Iconographia; Sive Conspectus Aliquot Millium, Tam Indigenarum Quam Exoticarum</i>… Regensburg, 1735–1737–1745. Est. $120,000 to $180,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Exodus 10:10 to 16:15. Complete Biblical scroll sheet in Hebrew, a Torah scroll panel. Middle East, ca. 10th or 11th century.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Copernicus Refuted. (Astronomy.). Scientific manuscript of a course of studies at Collège de la Trinité, Lyon. 1660s.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Israel’s War of Independence and the Early Days of the IDF. 58 photographs presented to Israel Ber, IDF officer and later convicted spy.
    <b>19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Early Unpublished Darwin letter on the races of man. Autograph Letter Signed [to Henry Denny]. Down, Kent, June 1, [1844].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Classic Image of American Slavery. Kimball, M. H. <i>Emancipated Slaves</i>. New York: George Hanks, 1863.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> (Underground Railroad.) Scaggs, Isaac. Important Runaway Slave Poster: $500 Reward Ran away, or decoyed from the subscriber…
  • <b>Sotheby’s Paris: Books & Manuscripts. 30 October 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> MARCEL PROUST. Du côté de chez Swann. Grasset, 1913. First edition. One of 5 copies on Japan paper, inscribed by the author to Louis Brun. Est. €400,000 - 600,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> Saint-Exupéry. <i>25 Autograph Illustrated Letters to his Friend Charles Sallès</i>. Est. €30,000-50,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> French Revolution, 1793. Déclaration des droits de l’Homme. 2,55 x 1,30m. A monumental wallpaper poster of the 1793 version, with hand-colored highlights. Unique copy. Est. €100,000 - 150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> GIAMBATTISTA PIRANESI. <i>Vedute di Roma</i>, 1748-1775. 107 etchings. An exceptional copy, printed and bound before 1780. Est. €50,000 - 80,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> Picasso, Pablo -- Fernando de Rojas. LA CÉLESTINE. [PARIS, EDITIONS DE L'ATELIER CROMMELYNCK, 1971.] One of the 30 copies hors commerce (n° X). 66 original etchings by Picasso. Signed. Est. €30,000 - €35,000
  • <b>Results from Bonhams’ sale of <i>Fine Books & Manuscripts Featuring Exploration and Travel</i></b>
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Columbus. De Insulis nuper in mari Indico repertis. Basel, 1494. SOLD for $751,500
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Cook in Tahiti. [Playbill]. [Germany, c.1840.] SOLD for $6,250
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Aa, Pieter van der. Naaukeurige versameling der gedenk-waardigste zee en land-reysen. Leyden, 1706-8. SOLD for $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Dürer. Underweysung der messung [and two more]. Nuremberg, 1525-8. SOLD for $175,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Cortes, Hernan. A Pleito signed by Antonio de Mendoza in the case of Hernan Cortes. 1542. SOLD for $8750
    <b>Results from Bonhams’ <i>The Air and Space Sale</i></b>
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Russian Kholod 5D67 HFL Rocket Engine. SOLD for $25,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Neil Armstrong Apollo Era Training Glove. SOLD for $50,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Full Scale Sputnik-1 EMC/EMI Lab Model. SOLD for $847,500
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> SOLRAD GREB Spy Satellite Engineering Dummy. SOLD for $10,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Soviet LK-3 Lunar Lander Model. SOLD for $25,000

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - January - 2015 Issue

Rare Americana from the 18th and 19th Centuries from David Lesser Antiquarian Books

18325f1d-37d5-49ff-a35c-94ed6ca40f2a

18th and 19th century Americana.

David M. Lesser Fine Antiquarian Books recently published their No. 141 of Rare Americana. It fits right in with the area in which Lesser specializes – pamphlets, broadsides, and other shorter form material pertaining to America, with the greatest concentration from Revolutionary times to Reconstruction. Naturally, much involves the predominate, divisive issue of the period between the Revolutionary and Civil Wars – slavery and its abolition. However, there were many other things going on during this period, and the debates over all of these issues come to life in these contemporary publications. Here are a few examples.

 

Long before the first plans were proposed to build a railroad to the Pacific coast, Lewis Tarascon had a proposal more suitable to pre-railroad times – a wagon road. He described it in this Petition of Lewis A. Tarascon [and others] Praying the Opening of a Wagon Road, from the River Missouri, North of the River Kansas, to the River Columbia... The petition was taken seriously enough to be printed by the Senate in 1824. Tarascon proposed obtaining a strip of land 100 miles wide from the Indians in which to site the road. This was the day in which publicly funded internal improvements were very controversial, but Tarascon planned to enable the company which built the road to trade in furs from the Northwest, still a lucrative business at the time. Bridges and ferries were proposed for water crossings, and tolls likely would have been imposed to provide additional funding. Of course, Tarascon's “Columbia Road” never came to be, but it certainly would have been a great convenience a few decades later when settlers headed out across the much rougher Oregon Trail to reach the Pacific West. Tarascon did not give up easily, and a decade later, he came up with an idea of creating connecting communal villages, starting at the upper Mississippi River, and then being added one-by-one farther west, eventually reaching a high point in the Rocky Mountains, and then proceeding all the way to the Columbia River. He dreamed of these being utopian communes, where everyone lived in peace and harmony. Quite obviously, this never happened either. Item 142. Priced at $350.

 

Eulogies for the recently departed are not often the subject of controversy, but this unnamed author was highly critical in A Review of Dr. John M. Mason's Oration on the Death of Gen. Hamilton, published in 1805. Mason was a good friend of Alexander Hamilton, and presumably spoke most highly of America's youthful founding father and leader of its early economic policy. The author describes Mason's speech as “a florid piece of declamation, resembling rather the exercise of a school-boy than the discourse of a divine...an extravagant panegyric.” What would set him off about a speech honoring a dead hero, where one would expect some natural embellishment of the subject? The problem was not so much what Mason said, but what he didn't say. The writer believed that Mason should have been more forthright about the ugly side of Hamilton's death, “the dreadful effects of duelling.” Hamilton was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr, and the author thought Mason should have used the opportunity to alert “all who were religiously disposed, and especially the clergy, to exert themselves in proclaiming the sinfulness of duelling.” He hoped that if the clergy expressed its abhorrence to dueling, people like Hamilton would be able to decline such challenges without it hurting their reputation. Item 70. $275.

 

There were some unhappy people around St. Louis at the time of this Representation and Petition of the Representatives Elected by the Freemen of the Territory of Louisiana. 4th January, 1805. The Louisiana Territory, as purchased from France, was being divided into two territories, what is today's state of Louisiana, and all of the rest, that vast area with St. Louis the major city. This large, but mainly uninhabited (by whites) territory, was to become a district of the Territory of Indiana, the old Northwest, then ranging from Ohio and Michigan to the Mississippi River. The Louisianans were not pleased. They herein objected to being subject to “the dictates of a foreign government; an incalculable accession of savage hordes to be vomited on our borders! an entire privation of some of the dearest rights enjoyed by freemen!” They obviously had a low opinion of their neighbors from Indiana. One of those “dearest rights enjoyed by freemen” was the right to enslave other men. Slavery was legal in Louisiana, but not in the Indiana Territory. Congress heard the petitioners' plea, with the Louisiana Territory becoming the independent Missouri Territory in 1812. Item 94. $1,500.

 

Horse stealing was taken very seriously a couple of centuries ago. People depended on their horses. Some jurisdictions imposed the death penalty, presuming your neighbors didn't get there first with a rope. However, one of the consequences of harsh penalties was greater use of executive pardons. Pennsylvania did not have such draconian penalties for horse thieves in 1797, but perhaps the convicted thief being a poor man's wife led Governor Thomas Mifflin to be more lenient in the case of Elizabeth Hyton. She had been sentenced to a month in jail and a $60 fine. That doesn't sound like much, and was lenient for the time, but $60 was an enormous amount of money back then for a poor family like the Hytons. Item 76 is a petition from John Hyton to the governor, in which he explains “that your petitioner is very poor and in distressing circumstances and unable to pay said fine, having also three small children who depend upon your petitioners daily labour for their scanty subsistence.” He therefore requested the Governor take into account “his deplorable situation” and cancel the fine. Governor Mifflin was evidently moved as once her one-month jail sentence was completed, he pardoned Mrs. Hyton. $600.

 

Black men had little chance in American courts in the 19th century. Half a century after this case, tried in 1808, the Dred Scott decision said that, in effect, they had no rights at all. So, this case is an interesting exception. It is an account of the case of The Commissioners of the Alms-House, vs. Alexander Whistelo, a Black Man; Being a Remarkable Case of Bastardy. Tried and Adjudged by the Mayor, Recorder, and Several Aldermen, of the City of New York... The Alms-House was concerned as they didn't want to support the child if the father could be found. Lucy Williams, described as “a yellow woman,” had charged Whistelo, a black man, as being the father of her “female bastard child.” Alexander Whistelo, fortunately, had some connections, being the coachman for the renown Dr. David Hosack, who testified at the trial. It was pointed out that the girl “appeared to be the child of a white man.” A Dr. Secor testified that children of black parents appear whiter when first born, but that “he supposed that it had been begotten by a white man.” Testimony was given about the appearance of the offspring of various racial connections, but ultimately, the Mayor was swayed by “the want of crisped hair.” Also, Lucy Williams' testimony that she had had relations with a white man as well as Whistelo sealed the deal. Item 109. $1,000.

 

David M. Lesser Fine Antiquarian Books may be reached at 203-389-8111 or dmlesser@lesserbooks.com. Their website is www.lesserbooks.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Announcing a new Books for Sale platform hosted by Biblio!</b>
    <b>List your books simultaneously on Rare Book Hub and Biblio!</b>
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b><br><i>The Centenary Edition of the Works of Ian Fleming</i>, one of 26 lettered sets, 18 volumes, London, 2008. $25,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> William Faulkner, <i>The Marble Faun</i>, first edition, signed & inscribed to Dorothy Wilcox by Faulkner & Phil Stone, Boston, 1924. $18,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Maurice Sendak, <i>Where the Wild Things Are</i>, first edition, signed & inscribed to William Archibald, New York, 1963. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Anne Frank, <i>Het Achterhuis</i>, first edition, in first state jacket, Amsterdam, 1947. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Roald Dahl, <i>Charlie and the Chocolate Factory</i>, first edition, signed, New York, 1964. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b><br>Ray Bradbury, <i>Fahrenheit 451</i>, first limited edition bound in Johns-Manville Quinterra, New York, 1953. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Benjamin Graham, <i>The Intelligent Investor</i>, first edition, in original dust jacket, New York, 1949. $4,500 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Anna Sewell, <i>Black Beauty</i>, first edition, inscribed, London, 1877. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Arthur Conan Doyle, <i>A Study in Scarlet</i>, first American edition, Philadelphia, 1890. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> James Fenimore Cooper, <i>The Last of the Mohicans</i>, first edition, two volumes, Philadelphia, 1826. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Amelia Earhart, <i>20 hrs. 40 mins. Our Flight in Friendship</i>, limited first edition, signed, New York, 1928. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Philip K. Dick, <i>World of Chance</i>, first edition, signed, London, 1956. $3,000 to $4,000.
  • <b>Sotheby’s London: Fine Autograph Letters and Manuscripts from a Distinguished Private Collection. Part I: Music. 26 October 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Beethoven, Ludwig van. Autograph Manuscript of the Canon "Ewig Dein" Woo 161, signed at the end ("...[Ewig] Dein...Freund Ludwig Van Beethowen"). Est. £120,000 to £150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Brahms, Johannes. Autograph Manuscript of the "Geistliches Wiegenlied", Op.91 No.2, for Contralto, Viola And Piano, the original version of 1864, signed and inscribed at the end by the composer. Est. £200,000 to £250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Chopin, Frédéric. Autograph Manuscript of the Opening of the Étude Op.25 No.2, in A-Flat Major, signed and dated ("Paris Ce 28 Avril F. Chopin"). Est. £100,000 to £150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London: Fine Autograph Letters and Manuscripts from a Distinguished Private Collection. Part I: Music. 26 October 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Haydn, Joseph. Autograph Letter Signed ("Jos Haydn[Paraph]"), to the Baden Choirmaster Anton Stoll, 30 July 1802. Est. £20,000 to £30,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Verdi, Giuseppe. Autograph Working Manuscript of a scene from Ernani. Est. £100,000 to £150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Verdi, Giuseppe. Highly Important Series of Thirty-Six Autograph Letters Signed to The Librettist Salvadore Cammarano, written between 1844 And 1851, the greater part unpublished and unrecorded. Est. £250,000 to £300,000

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