• <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 95. The Hours of the Cross, Use of Metz in Latin. Est. £40000–60000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 86. The Mckell Medical Almanack, in German [Alsace, c .1445]. £60000–80000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 87. Psalter for Dominican Use, in Latin and German. Est. £25000–35000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 88. Sermon collection, in Latin, 220 leaves, Illuminated manuscript on parchment. Est. £15000–20000.
    <b>Bloomsbury: Western Manuscripts & Miniatures, 08 July 2015.</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 100. Book of Hours, Use of Rome, with numerous other devotional texts, in Latin and French. Est. £30000–50000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 62. St. Denis holding his severed head, large miniature on a leaf from a Book of Hours, in Latin. Est. £4000–6000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 54. The Annunciation to the Virgin, large miniature on a leaf from a Book of Hours. Est. £4000–6000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 53.<br>A Physician with Two Amputees, miniature from an early copy of Bartholomaeus Anglicanus.<br>Est. £8000–12000.
    <b>Bloomsbury: Western Manuscripts & Miniatures, 08 July 2015.</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 10.<br>Isaiah, fragment of a leaf from a monumental Carolingian Bible, in Latin. Est. £15000–20000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 14. The<br>relic list of Bishop Werinharius of Merseburg, from a Romanesque manuscript. Est. £8000–12000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 8. Fragment from the earliest copy of St. Augustine. Est. £20000–30000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 7. Latin text, most probably an official document, on papyrus. [Egypt or perhaps Italy, probably first century BC.-first century AD.] Est. £8000–12000.
  • Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 1. Watercolor painting of a church by Adolf Hitler. US$ 15000-20000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 207. SS Honor Goblet presented to SS-Hauptstrumfuhrer Gerhald Pleiss. US$ 10000-15000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 380. "The Goring Telegram". Hermann Goring's Telegram to Hilter advising he would assume control of the Reich. US$ 15000-20000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 381. First public knowledge that Germany had surrendered - Teletype print-out and punch tape from the Pentagon's war message room.<br>US$ 8000-10000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 721. Breeches buoy life fring from the sinking of the R.M.S. LUSITANIA. US$ 10000-12000
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 759. Japanese body armor ca. 16th-17th century. US$ 10000-12000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 935. Union lieutenant colonel's uniform jacket. US$ 5000-7000
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 937. A surgeon's boxed set of amputation implements possibly used during and after the battle of Gettysburg. US$ 4000-5000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 1106. Black Voters Are Disenfranchised In Pennsylvania. Constitutional convention of 1837<br>in November 1838. US$ 300-400.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 1133. "Alaska Views" Klondike photo albums (2). US$ 5000-8000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 1253. Kaiser Wilhelm II personally owned and worn Garde Hussar pelzmuetze ("busby")... <br> US$ 15000-20000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 1459A. Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat original art - mutually executed and signed fingerprint cards. US$ 12000-15000.
  • <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0110.<br>John James Audubon. <i>Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> The Birds of America from Drawings. Est. $10,000-15,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0116. Letter from John James Audubon to Robert Havell, His Engraver, signed "John J. Audubon", 1839. Est. $4,000-6,000.
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0141. George Washington Revolutionary War, 1779 letter to Brigadier General James Clinton. Est. $20,000-30,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0142.<br>Thomas Jefferson letter, 1802. One page letter written to his master carpenter, James Dinsmore.<br>Est. $15,000-25,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0170. William Bligh's <i>A Narrative of the Mutiny on Board His Majesty's Ship Bounty</i>.<br>Est. 15,000-20,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0181. <i>Georgia Scenes Characters, Incidents, Etc.</i>, by Augustus Baldwin Longstreet. <br>Est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0190.<br>[Hariot’s Virginia] <i>Wunderbarliche</i> doch Warhafftige Erklärung. Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0200. FDR’s copy of <i>The American Traveller; or Guide to the United States</i> by H. S. Tanner, 1837, with Franklin D. Roosevelt's ownership signature. Est. $500-800
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0205. Fine Pair English Globes John & William Cary London, 1800. Est. $15,000-25,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0220. Maris Pacicici [quod vulgo Mar del] by Abrahamus Ortelius, Antwerp, 1589. Est. $3,000-5,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0263. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell [signed]. Est. $2,000-4,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey. First Edition, signed. Est. $2,000-4,000
  • <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 1.<br>THE RESURRECTION, large historiated initial on a leaf from an Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum.<br>£40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 2. RAYMOND OF PENYAFORT (1175-1275), <i>Quia tractare intendimus</i>, with Tables of Consanquinity and Affinity. £30,000-£50,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 6. The Lamb in the Mist of the Elders, and the Opening of the Book, two miniatures. £40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 7. <br>The Prophet Nahum and A Man Playing an Organ, two historiated initials on a leaf of a Bible in Latin.<br>£50,000-£80,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 20. The <i>'Gospels of Queen Theutberga'</i> in Latin, Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum. £1,000,000-£1,500,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 26. <i>Book of Hours</i>, use of Metz, in Latin and French, Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum. £80,000-£120,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 51. SHEPARD, E. H. (1879-1976) and<br>A. A. MILNE (1882-1956). <i>Vespers</i>. £30,000-£50,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 83. DANTE ALIGHIERI (1265-1321). <i>La Commedia</i>. Commentary by Cristoforo Landino. £40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 106. FRITH, Francis (1822-1898). <i>Egypt, Sinai, and Jerusalem: Series of Twenty Photo ...</i> £80,000-£120,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 114. MAN RAY (1890-1976). An album of gelatin silver prints, c.1920-c.1930. £60,000-£90,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 150. MERIAN, Maria Sibylla (1647-1717). <i>Neues Blumenbuch</i>. Nuremberg: Johann Andreas Graff, 1680. £200,000-£300,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 157. WEINMANN, Johann Wilhelm (1683-1741). <i>Phytanthoza iconographia; sive Conspectus aliquot millium ...</i> £70,000-£100,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - July - 2014 Issue

Written Documents from People You Know Offered by the Raab Collection

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Catalog 77 from the Raab Collection.

The Raab Collection has published their Catalog 77. It presents 40 items, mostly written and signed documents, some of considerable length. These are all from people you know, many from politics, some from science and other endeavors. The great majority are Americans, but others such as Churchill, Darwin, Gandhi and Napoleon make an appearance. We will take a look at a few samples of these fascinating, often important documents.

 

We begin with a thank you letter from George Washington. It is the time and circumstances that make this “thank you” special. It was written in Philadelphia on December 30, 1778. The British had captured Philadelphia in the fall of the previous year, and Washington and his troops had to survive a brutal winter at Valley Forge. The situation was dire for the colonial army. However, come February, the Americans managed to sign an alliance with France, which promised to provide naval support. The threat of French warships entering the British stronghold of New York called for reinforcements, so in June, the British troops abandoned Philadelphia to return to New York. Washington pursued the British, and then set up headquarters at West Point, north of New York, where he could keep an eye on the enemy. Congress returned to Philadelphia, from which it earlier had fled, and in December, Washington made his first return. It was a triumphant return, and on December 29, the governing Magistrates of Philadelphia officially welcomed him with great praise. The next day, Washington responded to them with this letter. He thanks them for the honor, and notes, “...I sincerely hope that a persevering exercise of the same national virtues which have hereto frustrated the designs of the enemy will perpetuate to this city a full enjoyment of all the blessings which have been the objects of the present glorious and important contest.” Item 2. Priced at $120,000.

 

Washington wasn't the only general to appreciate the value of perseverance. General William T. Sherman credited it as the major factor in his victorious March to the Sea against the Confederate Army in 1864. Item 17 is a letter Sherman wrote to a friend from his days back in California before the Civil War. The friend was looking for advice on how to play a role in the war. The General provides some advice, but most interestingly, talks about the current state of the war. The letter is dated December 23, 1864, and Sherman's troops had just begun to enter Savannah the previous day, bringing his March to the Sea to a successful conclusion. This previously unknown letter may have been the first he wrote from Savannah. Sherman writes, “My own success in the war has resulted more from persevering through ill report and good report than from professional knowledge; and if my example be worth anything, it results from this truth.” Despite the victory and hasty retreat of the Confederates, Sherman adds, “I do not regard the war as over yet, by a good deal...” $14,000.

 

Back in the 1860's, Charles Darwin certainly appreciated all the support he could get. He had many supporters, but his theory of evolution was so disruptive to most people's world view that opposition ran high. In 1866, he received a letter from Robert MacLachlin, a young scientist, who had been studying insects. His studies led him to agree with some of Darwin's finding. Specifically, he found some could adapt to their environment, changing color and the like. It led MacLachlin to conclude that the previously accepted belief in the immutability of species was wrong. That, in turn, meant evolution was possible. On March 23, Darwin responded with this letter. He writes, “I have been very glad to see (whether or not you have been influenced by my writings) that you have given up to a great extent the belief in the immutability of species...” Darwin also offers some suggestions as to further experiments MacLachlin might try. Item 10. $22,000.

 

Item 20 is a typed letter signed by President John F. Kennedy on January 5, 1962. It was sent to the publisher of the Chicago American, a popular afternoon newspaper in the Windy City. Kennedy had briefly worked as a reporter at the American's predecessor in 1945. Kennedy offers his congratulations on the paper's new building. He then goes on to speak about the role of the press in a free society. Kennedy lauds the free press, but also notes its responsibility to the people. He believed that an “informed citizenry” was essential for a free country. He praises the American's role, and notes, “It is my hope that it will continue to disseminate information wisely and with full awareness of the responsibility and opportunity which it has.” What Kennedy couldn't have known was the dire situation that newspapers would soon face, particularly afternoon ones like the American. It may have been healthy enough to build a new plant in 1962, but by the end of the decade, it was changing its name and format, and in 1974, closed down for good. One can only wonder what Kennedy would think about people getting their news from biased cable “news” talkers or via Facebook. $13,000.

Rare Book Monthly


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