Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - May - 2014 Issue

New Acquisitions at Bauman Rare Books

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New acquisitions.

Bauman Rare Books published a catalogue of Fine New Acquisitions a little while back. These are certainly fine items, with the selection broken down into sections: Americana; Literature; History, Philosophy, Religion, Science & Economics; Children's Literature; Art & Illustrated; and Hollywood. We will take a look at a few of these items.

 

We will start with a truly neat letter from Jacqueline Kennedy, written in August of 1960 while her husband was campaigning for the presidency. Jackie was a Bouvier from New York before she married, and she had received a letter from a member of a Bouvier family in New York. However, it turns out they were not related, though she had spoken to the man once as a child. It seems he was the only non-related Bouvier in the New York phone book. Mrs. Kennedy says that the unrelated Bouvier, Maurice, was actually a friend of her grandfather, and lived in the same building as her other grandfather. She continues that she once called him. “He was charming and patient and I was about 8 years old.” Jackie then concludes with some appropriate electioneering for JFK. Since they are not related, she concedes, “So now you have no real excuse to change your political leanings – but I hope you will do as I have done – who was brought up in a family of most ardent Republicans – and decide that my husband is well worth switching for!” Item 20. Priced at $4,500.

 

Item 68 was the first major positive look at an English king who has a terrible reputation: The History of the Life and Reigne of Richard the Third, by George Buck, published in 1646. Richard battled his way to the top, accused of killing two young princes who stood in his way. He became King in 1483, but immediately found his kingdom in a state of rebellion from powerful forces who opposed his accession. He put it down for awhile, but a more serious attempt was led by Henry Tudor two years later. Richard went to battle, fought bravely, but was killed on the battlefield. His short reign was over. It is subject to debate whether Richard was any worse, or any more brutal, than others of his time. Certainly some of Tudors who followed, such Henry VIII or Bloody Mary, leave a lot to be desired in terms of their humanity. However, to the victor go the spoils, and the Tudors had every reason to depict Richard as the most horrible of kings so as to justify their legitimacy. The coup de grace to that reputation was delivered by Shakespeare in his play about Richard, with all the stereotypes of brutality, physical deformity, and whatnot displayed. The result was that Buck's account provided a very different look at the now ancient king. Of course, by then the Tudor dynasty had come to an end, with the Stuarts taking over. Some believe Richard, if somewhat uncouth, was a good lawmaker and good to the common people. As an aside, Richard's final resting place was long uncertain, and it was the unearthing of what are believed to be his bones over five centuries later under a London parking lot that made headlines in 2012. $4,200.

 

Speaking of Poor Richard, here is the last of the almanacs of that name published by Benjamin Franklin and David Hall. This is the edition of 1766 and it features a full printing of the British act that did more than any other to turn the colonists to rebellion – the Stamp Act. Franklin would have the opportunity to give Parliament a piece of the colonists' mind on February 13 of that year, noting that troops sent to enforce the Act would not find a rebellion but start one. Item 2. $32,000.

 

Item 106 is the first American, and virtually the first obtainable edition of the ultimate book of illogical logic, Alice's Adventure's in Wonderland. The first edition was published in London, but was recalled, only around 20 copies having survived. The illustrator of Lewis Carroll's classic, John Tenniel, was dissatisfied with the printing of his drawings. However, most of the sheets from the original printing were still on the shelf. What to do? Of course, ship them off to America. The Americans won't know the difference. And so, these sheets were given a new title page, and the first American edition was born. It was the first to reach all but a handful of people. $21,000.

 

Greta Garbo was an alien in America, but not an illegal one. We know that from item 134. It is her application to extend her temporary stay, dated October 29, 1929, and filed with the Immigration Service. She was present on a nine-month visa that was about to expire. It gives her age as 24, occupation as actress, home country as Sweden. Miss Garbo's income was $4,000 per week, a lot of money today, an enormous amount of money in 1929. She has signed her name at the end of the form. Garbo would not have realized it at the time, but having a lot of money was particularly valuable on that day. October 29, 1929, was Black Tuesday, the day of the stock market crash that began the Great Depression. $5,500.

 

Bauman Rare Books, with locations in New York, Philadelphia, and Las Vegas, may be reached at 212-751-0011 or BRB@BaumanRareBooks.com. Their website is www.BaumanRareBooks.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Jacques-Émile Ruhlmann, wallpaper sample book, circa 1919. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Archive from a late office of the Breuer & Smith architectural team, New York, 1960-70s. $3,500 to $5,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> William Morris, <i>The Story of the Glittering Plain or the Land of Living Men,</i> illustrated by Walter Crane, Kelmscott Press, Hammersmith, 1894. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Gustave Doré, <i>La Sainte Bible selon la Vulgate,</i> Tours, 1866. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Gustav Klimt & Max Eisler, <i>Eine Nachlese,</i> complete set, Vienna, 1931. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>Eric Allatini & Gerda Wegener, <i>Sur Talons Rouges,</i> with original watercolor by Wegener, Paris, 1929. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>C.P. Cavafy, <i>Fourteen Poems,</i> illustrated & signed by David Hockney, London, 1966. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Jean Midolle, <i>Spécimen des Écritures Modernes...</i>, Strasbourg, 1834-35. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>E.A. Seguy, <i>Floréal: Dessins & Coloris Nouveaux,</i> Paris, 1925. $3,000 to $4,000.
  • <b>Bonhams: Results from Fine Books and Manuscripts on March 9, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> BEETHOVEN, LUDWIG VAN. Autograph Manuscript sketch-leaf part of the score of the Scottish Songs, "Sunset" Op. 108 no 2. [Vienna, February 1818]. Inscribed by Alexander Wheelock Thayer. SOLD for $131,250
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> Violin belonging to Albert Einstein, presented to him by Oscar H. Steger, 1933. SOLD for $516,500
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. Autograph Letter Signed ("Papa") to his son Hans Albert, discussing his involvement with the atomic bomb, September 2, 1945. SOLD for $106,250
    <b>Bonhams: Results from Fine Books and Manuscripts on March 9, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> HAMILTON, ALEXANDER. Autograph Letter Signed, to Baron von Steuben, with extensive notes of Von Steuben's aide Benjamin Walker, June 12, 1780. SOLD for $16,250
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in Latin, being detailed instructions on making the philosopher's stone. 8 pp. 1790s. SOLD for $275,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> 1869 Inauguration Bible of President Ulysses S. Grant. SOLD for $118,750
  • <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> E.H. SHEPARD, Original drawing for A.A. Milne’s The House at Pooh Corner.<br>$40,000-60,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> BERNARD RATZER, Plan of the City of New York in North America, surveyed in the years 1766 & 1767. $80,000-100,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> THOMAS JEFFERSON, Autograph letter signed comparing Logan, Tecumseh, and Little Turtle to the Spartans. Monticello: 15 February 1821. $14,000-18,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN C. FREMONT, Narrative of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains, in the Year 1842.. Abridged edition, the only one containing the folding map From the Sporting Library of Arnold “Jake” Johnson. $3,000-5,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> ZANE GREY, Album containing 94 large format photographs of Grey and party at Catalina Island, Arizona, and fishing in the Pacific. From the Sporting Library of Arnold “Jake” Johnson. $5,000-$8,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> WILLIAM COMBE, A History of Madeira ... illustrative of the Costumes, Manners, and Occupations of the Inhabitants. produced by Ackermann in 1821; From the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> ERIC TAVERNER, Salmon Fishing... One of 275 copies signed by Taverner, published in 1931,From the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN WHITEHEAD, Exploration of Mount Kina Balu, North Borneo. Whitehead reached the high point of Kinabalu in 1888. Part of a major group of travel books from the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN LONG, Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader, describing the Manners and Customs of the North American Indians... The first edition of 1791. $3,000-$5,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> SAMUEL BECKETT, Stirrings Still. This, Beckett’s last work of fiction with original lithographs by Le Brocquy, limited to 200 copies signed by the author and the artist. From the Estate of Howard Kaminsky.. $1,500-$2,500
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>

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