• <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 95. The Hours of the Cross, Use of Metz in Latin. Est. £40000–60000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 86. The Mckell Medical Almanack, in German [Alsace, c .1445]. £60000–80000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 87. Psalter for Dominican Use, in Latin and German. Est. £25000–35000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 88. Sermon collection, in Latin, 220 leaves, Illuminated manuscript on parchment. Est. £15000–20000.
    <b>Bloomsbury: Western Manuscripts & Miniatures, 08 July 2015.</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 100. Book of Hours, Use of Rome, with numerous other devotional texts, in Latin and French. Est. £30000–50000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 62. St. Denis holding his severed head, large miniature on a leaf from a Book of Hours, in Latin. Est. £4000–6000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 54. The Annunciation to the Virgin, large miniature on a leaf from a Book of Hours. Est. £4000–6000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 53.<br>A Physician with Two Amputees, miniature from an early copy of Bartholomaeus Anglicanus.<br>Est. £8000–12000.
    <b>Bloomsbury: Western Manuscripts & Miniatures, 08 July 2015.</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 10.<br>Isaiah, fragment of a leaf from a monumental Carolingian Bible, in Latin. Est. £15000–20000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 14. The<br>relic list of Bishop Werinharius of Merseburg, from a Romanesque manuscript. Est. £8000–12000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 8. Fragment from the earliest copy of St. Augustine. Est. £20000–30000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 7. Latin text, most probably an official document, on papyrus. [Egypt or perhaps Italy, probably first century BC.-first century AD.] Est. £8000–12000.
  • Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 1. Watercolor painting of a church by Adolf Hitler. US$ 15000-20000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 207. SS Honor Goblet presented to SS-Hauptstrumfuhrer Gerhald Pleiss. US$ 10000-15000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 380. "The Goring Telegram". Hermann Goring's Telegram to Hilter advising he would assume control of the Reich. US$ 15000-20000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 381. First public knowledge that Germany had surrendered - Teletype print-out and punch tape from the Pentagon's war message room.<br>US$ 8000-10000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 721. Breeches buoy life fring from the sinking of the R.M.S. LUSITANIA. US$ 10000-12000
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 759. Japanese body armor ca. 16th-17th century. US$ 10000-12000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 935. Union lieutenant colonel's uniform jacket. US$ 5000-7000
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 937. A surgeon's boxed set of amputation implements possibly used during and after the battle of Gettysburg. US$ 4000-5000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 1106. Black Voters Are Disenfranchised In Pennsylvania. Constitutional convention of 1837<br>in November 1838. US$ 300-400.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 1133. "Alaska Views" Klondike photo albums (2). US$ 5000-8000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 1253. Kaiser Wilhelm II personally owned and worn Garde Hussar pelzmuetze ("busby")... <br> US$ 15000-20000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 1459A. Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat original art - mutually executed and signed fingerprint cards. US$ 12000-15000.
  • <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0110.<br>John James Audubon. <i>Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> The Birds of America from Drawings. Est. $10,000-15,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0116. Letter from John James Audubon to Robert Havell, His Engraver, signed "John J. Audubon", 1839. Est. $4,000-6,000.
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0141. George Washington Revolutionary War, 1779 letter to Brigadier General James Clinton. Est. $20,000-30,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0142.<br>Thomas Jefferson letter, 1802. One page letter written to his master carpenter, James Dinsmore.<br>Est. $15,000-25,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0170. William Bligh's <i>A Narrative of the Mutiny on Board His Majesty's Ship Bounty</i>.<br>Est. 15,000-20,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0181. <i>Georgia Scenes Characters, Incidents, Etc.</i>, by Augustus Baldwin Longstreet. <br>Est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0190.<br>[Hariot’s Virginia] <i>Wunderbarliche</i> doch Warhafftige Erklärung. Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0200. FDR’s copy of <i>The American Traveller; or Guide to the United States</i> by H. S. Tanner, 1837, with Franklin D. Roosevelt's ownership signature. Est. $500-800
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0205. Fine Pair English Globes John & William Cary London, 1800. Est. $15,000-25,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0220. Maris Pacicici [quod vulgo Mar del] by Abrahamus Ortelius, Antwerp, 1589. Est. $3,000-5,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0263. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell [signed]. Est. $2,000-4,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey. First Edition, signed. Est. $2,000-4,000
  • <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 1.<br>THE RESURRECTION, large historiated initial on a leaf from an Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum.<br>£40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 2. RAYMOND OF PENYAFORT (1175-1275), <i>Quia tractare intendimus</i>, with Tables of Consanquinity and Affinity. £30,000-£50,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 6. The Lamb in the Mist of the Elders, and the Opening of the Book, two miniatures. £40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 7. <br>The Prophet Nahum and A Man Playing an Organ, two historiated initials on a leaf of a Bible in Latin.<br>£50,000-£80,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 20. The <i>'Gospels of Queen Theutberga'</i> in Latin, Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum. £1,000,000-£1,500,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 26. <i>Book of Hours</i>, use of Metz, in Latin and French, Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum. £80,000-£120,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 51. SHEPARD, E. H. (1879-1976) and<br>A. A. MILNE (1882-1956). <i>Vespers</i>. £30,000-£50,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 83. DANTE ALIGHIERI (1265-1321). <i>La Commedia</i>. Commentary by Cristoforo Landino. £40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 106. FRITH, Francis (1822-1898). <i>Egypt, Sinai, and Jerusalem: Series of Twenty Photo ...</i> £80,000-£120,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 114. MAN RAY (1890-1976). An album of gelatin silver prints, c.1920-c.1930. £60,000-£90,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 150. MERIAN, Maria Sibylla (1647-1717). <i>Neues Blumenbuch</i>. Nuremberg: Johann Andreas Graff, 1680. £200,000-£300,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 157. WEINMANN, Johann Wilhelm (1683-1741). <i>Phytanthoza iconographia; sive Conspectus aliquot millium ...</i> £70,000-£100,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - May - 2014 Issue

New Acquisitions at Bauman Rare Books

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New acquisitions.

Bauman Rare Books published a catalogue of Fine New Acquisitions a little while back. These are certainly fine items, with the selection broken down into sections: Americana; Literature; History, Philosophy, Religion, Science & Economics; Children's Literature; Art & Illustrated; and Hollywood. We will take a look at a few of these items.

 

We will start with a truly neat letter from Jacqueline Kennedy, written in August of 1960 while her husband was campaigning for the presidency. Jackie was a Bouvier from New York before she married, and she had received a letter from a member of a Bouvier family in New York. However, it turns out they were not related, though she had spoken to the man once as a child. It seems he was the only non-related Bouvier in the New York phone book. Mrs. Kennedy says that the unrelated Bouvier, Maurice, was actually a friend of her grandfather, and lived in the same building as her other grandfather. She continues that she once called him. “He was charming and patient and I was about 8 years old.” Jackie then concludes with some appropriate electioneering for JFK. Since they are not related, she concedes, “So now you have no real excuse to change your political leanings – but I hope you will do as I have done – who was brought up in a family of most ardent Republicans – and decide that my husband is well worth switching for!” Item 20. Priced at $4,500.

 

Item 68 was the first major positive look at an English king who has a terrible reputation: The History of the Life and Reigne of Richard the Third, by George Buck, published in 1646. Richard battled his way to the top, accused of killing two young princes who stood in his way. He became King in 1483, but immediately found his kingdom in a state of rebellion from powerful forces who opposed his accession. He put it down for awhile, but a more serious attempt was led by Henry Tudor two years later. Richard went to battle, fought bravely, but was killed on the battlefield. His short reign was over. It is subject to debate whether Richard was any worse, or any more brutal, than others of his time. Certainly some of Tudors who followed, such Henry VIII or Bloody Mary, leave a lot to be desired in terms of their humanity. However, to the victor go the spoils, and the Tudors had every reason to depict Richard as the most horrible of kings so as to justify their legitimacy. The coup de grace to that reputation was delivered by Shakespeare in his play about Richard, with all the stereotypes of brutality, physical deformity, and whatnot displayed. The result was that Buck's account provided a very different look at the now ancient king. Of course, by then the Tudor dynasty had come to an end, with the Stuarts taking over. Some believe Richard, if somewhat uncouth, was a good lawmaker and good to the common people. As an aside, Richard's final resting place was long uncertain, and it was the unearthing of what are believed to be his bones over five centuries later under a London parking lot that made headlines in 2012. $4,200.

 

Speaking of Poor Richard, here is the last of the almanacs of that name published by Benjamin Franklin and David Hall. This is the edition of 1766 and it features a full printing of the British act that did more than any other to turn the colonists to rebellion – the Stamp Act. Franklin would have the opportunity to give Parliament a piece of the colonists' mind on February 13 of that year, noting that troops sent to enforce the Act would not find a rebellion but start one. Item 2. $32,000.

 

Item 106 is the first American, and virtually the first obtainable edition of the ultimate book of illogical logic, Alice's Adventure's in Wonderland. The first edition was published in London, but was recalled, only around 20 copies having survived. The illustrator of Lewis Carroll's classic, John Tenniel, was dissatisfied with the printing of his drawings. However, most of the sheets from the original printing were still on the shelf. What to do? Of course, ship them off to America. The Americans won't know the difference. And so, these sheets were given a new title page, and the first American edition was born. It was the first to reach all but a handful of people. $21,000.

 

Greta Garbo was an alien in America, but not an illegal one. We know that from item 134. It is her application to extend her temporary stay, dated October 29, 1929, and filed with the Immigration Service. She was present on a nine-month visa that was about to expire. It gives her age as 24, occupation as actress, home country as Sweden. Miss Garbo's income was $4,000 per week, a lot of money today, an enormous amount of money in 1929. She has signed her name at the end of the form. Garbo would not have realized it at the time, but having a lot of money was particularly valuable on that day. October 29, 1929, was Black Tuesday, the day of the stock market crash that began the Great Depression. $5,500.

 

Bauman Rare Books, with locations in New York, Philadelphia, and Las Vegas, may be reached at 212-751-0011 or BRB@BaumanRareBooks.com. Their website is www.BaumanRareBooks.com.

Rare Book Monthly


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