• <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 10: Boone, Daniel. Autograph document signed. Est. $12,000-15,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 29: Darwin, Charles. Autograph letter signed. Est. $4,000-6,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 30: Davis, Jefferson. Civl War-date autograph letter signed. <BR>Est. $15,000-25,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 45: Einstein, Albert. Autograph letter signed. Est. $15,000-$25.000.
    <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 46: Einstein, Albert. A large archive.<br>Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 48: Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed. Est. $15,000-25,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 57: Fulton, Robert. Autograph letter signed. Est. $8,000-12,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 74: Jackson, Thomas J. ("Stonewall"). <br>Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 97: Lincoln, Abraham. A Proclamation, January 1863. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 99: [Slavery - Thirteenth Amendment]. Est. $80,000-120,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 116: Newton, Sir Isaac. Autograph document signed ("Is. Newton"). <br>Est. $30,000-$50,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 200: Ruth Babe. Photograph signed. <br>Est. $4,000-6,000.
  • <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 52. Herman Melville. Autograph letter signed ,1858. est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 55.<br>Edgar Allan Poe. Oil on canvas portrait, est. $400-600
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 61. John Roberts. Account and Memoranda books of the Pennsylvania Quaker miller executed for treason during the American Revolution,<br>est. $6,000-8,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 106. Marc Chagall. <i>Le Plafond de l'Opera</i>, inscribed copy, est. $400-600
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 147. Manuscript Prayer Book in Latin and Dutch with Hand-colored woodcuts, c. 1500, est. $2,000-2,500
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 189. McKenney & Hall. <i>History of the Indian Tribes of North America</i>, 1837-38, est. $8,000-12,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 204. <br>Julio Plaza and Augusto do Campos. <i>Obetos Serigrafias Originais</i>, 1969,<br> est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 222. <i>Nuremberg Chronicle in</i> Latin, 1493, est. $25,000-35,000
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 234. <i>Third Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners of the Central Park</i>, 1860, est. $800-1,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 249. Theodor De Bry. Hand-colored illustrations of North American Indians, est. $2,000-2,500
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 254. <br>Pete Hawley. Original illustration<br>for Jantzenaire corsets, 1950s,<br>est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 264. <i>Burr's Atlas of the State of New York</i>, 1840, est. $7,000-9,000
  • <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Manuscripts
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Miniatures
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Early Printed Books
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Jason Master, Haarlem, c. 1475-80
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Boucicaut Master, Paris, c. 1415
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Rohan Master, probably Troyes, c. 1415-20
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Julius Caesar, De bello Gallico, manuscript on vellum, Milan, c. 1450-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Biblia Latina, Paris, 1476-77, first edition of the Vulgate printed in France
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Ludolph of Saxony, Vie du Christ, illuminated by the Master of the Chronique Scandaleuse, 1506-08
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b><br>King David, miniature on vellum, Bologna, c. 1470
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Christ calling St. Peter, miniature on vellum, by Pellegrino di Mariano Rossini, Siena, 1471
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Presentation in Temple, miniature on vellum, Nuremberg, c. 1490-1500
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Bible, illuminated in the <i>primo stile</i>, Bologna, c. 1250-70
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Valturio, De re militari, Verona 1483, first edition in Italian
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Celestial vision at Constantinople, single-leaf woodcut, Nuremberg,<br>c. 1490-91
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Catalogue 160: Magnificent Books, Manuscripts, & Photographs
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Shakespeare's First Folio (1623)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Charles Darwin family photograph album
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Spectacular album of mammoth photos of the American West by Watkins & others
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Washington family copy of The Federalist (1788)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Underground Railroad runaway broadside (1857)

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - May - 2013 Issue

The American Revolution in Manuscript from Joe Rubinfine

Washphilab

Washington reports the British have abandoned Philadelphia.

Item 55 is a sad letter, written by a great patriot, Brigidier-General Joseph Palmer. Palmer was a very successful businessman and manufacturer from Quincy, Massachusetts, John Adams' hometown. He was also a strong supporter of the revolutionary cause. Though just a year shy of 60 years of age at the time, he participated in the Battle of Lexington and later at Breed's Hill. He also contributed financially to the cause with great generosity. The Revolution tore apart his business interests, but that did not deter Palmer from his ardent support. Having been advanced in the military for his great support and participation, he was placed in charge of an attack on the British in Rhode Island. That was probably not a great idea as Palmer was more businessman than military man, and when the support he expected from his superior, General Joseph Spencer, did not arrive, the mission turned into a disaster. Palmer was forced to retreat. He quickly became the scapegoat, with Spencer pressing charges, perhaps to protect his own reputation. In this letter, Palmer writes that he had no notice of the charges, and asks Hancock for time to prepare his defense. “If ever I exhibited any proof of public virtue, it was upon this expedition – and this is the reward!!! So long as life & liberty remains, I will justify my conduct, even if certain Death should be the consequence.” Hancock, a former neighbor and friend, provided little assistance, and Palmer was charged with neglect and disobedience. The charges later were thrown out and the Continental Congress, in which Palmer had served, cleared him after a lengthy investigation. Nonetheless, Palmer's reputation was damaged and he lost most of his fortune supporting the Revolution. $1,000.

Item 77 is an important document signed by George Washington at what was a major turning point in the war. The British had marched from New York to Philadelphia in the fall of 1777, forcing the Americans to abandon their capital. Washington and his troops had to survive the cold and terrible conditions of the long winter at Valley Forge. However, by the following spring, France had joined the war on the side of the patriots and England was forced to rethink its strategy. Fearful of attacks on New York by the French Navy, the British decided to abandon their capture of Philadelphia and return their troops to New York to fortify its defense. It effectively signaled an end to England's attempt to capture the northern colonies by land, turning instead to a strategy of naval harassment of ports and capturing of land in the less well defended south. On June 18, 1778, Washington learned that the British were evacuating Philadelphia. He whipped off this letter (written by his aid, Robert Harrison, and signed by Washington) to George Bryan, Vice-President of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania. Washington writes, “I have the pleasure to inform you, that I was this minute advised by Mr. Roberts's, that the enemy evacuated the City early this morning..” The General notes that many citizens had observed the retreat. At the end, he adds, “P.S. A letter from Capt. McClean dated in Philadelphia, this moment came to hand confirming the evacuation.” “Mr. Roberts” is likely Philadelphia merchant George Roberts, while Capt. Allen McLane was a cavalry commander. $45,000.

Joe Rubinfine may be reached at 321-455-1666 or Joerubinfine@mindspring.com

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