• <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE GUTENBERG BIBLE, MAINZ. Price realized: $5,390,000. Oct 1987, NY.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> LEONARDO DA VINCI, Codex Hammer. Price realized: $30,802,500. Nov 1994 NY
    <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE FORBES COLLECTION, Price realized: $40,900,000. Mar 2002, New York.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> ANDRE FRANQUIN, SPIROU ET FANTASIO. Price realized: €157,500. Apr 2014, Paris, France.
    <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE GREAT HOURS OF GALEAZZO MARIA SFORZA. Price realized: £1,217,250. Jul 2011, London.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE ROTHSCHILD PRAYERBOOK. A Book of Hours, use of Rome, in Latin. Price realized: $13,605,000.
  • <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> THE <br>QUILL. <i>A Magazine of Greenwich Village</i>. 30 issues, 1918-1925 Estimate: $1,000-2,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> VIEW:<br>The Modern Magazine. Marcel Duchamp number. March, 1945. Estimate: 400-600
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Ortelius, Abraham. Maris Pacifici. [Antwerp], 1589.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Melville, Herman. <i>Moby Dick; or, The Whale</i>. New York, 1851. First American edition, first issue.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers: Fine Books and Manuscripts, May 7, 2015.</b>
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. <i>Works </i>. Garden City, 1930. 24 vols. Signed. 
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Pockocke, Richard. <i>A Description of the East,</i> and Some Other Countries.London, 1743-1745. First edition.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Audubon, John James, after. <i>American Elk - Apiti Deer, Cervus Canadensus</i>, plate LXII, no. 13.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Felix. Autographed letter signed, July 20, 1832. To Aloys Fuchs.
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers: Fine Books and Manuscripts, May 7, 2015.</b>
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Lee, Robert E. Autographed letter signed, to Ulysses S. Grant. February 21, 1865.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Campbell, Colin. <i>Vitruvius Britannicus</i>. London, 1715-125, 1767, 1771. 5 vols. First edition
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Autographed letter signed, 1p., to Judge W.A. Minshall. September 6, 1849.
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> A Century <br>of Progress International Exposition. Chicago, 1933-1934. Chicago,<br>(c. 1934). Mayor Cermak copy.).
    <b>Leslie Hindman May 7th:</b> The Nonesuch Dickens. Bloomsbury, 1937-1938. 22 volumes, limited.
  • <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Latest catalogue: 50 Fine Books 2015
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> M. Catesby,<br>The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands (London, 1729-77).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility (London, 1811). First edition of the Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Koronatsionniy sbornik [Album of Nicholas II's coronation] (St. Petersburg, 1899): preferred deluxe version in Russian.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> A complete set of John Gould's magnificent bird books in attractive contemporary bindings (1831-88).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Andy Warhol, Bald Eagle from Endangered Species. Screenprint in colours, 1983, signed in pencil.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Sir Ernest Shackleton, South: The story of Shackleton’s last expedition 1914-1917 (London, 1919).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> J.J. Audubon, The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (NY, 1845-54): The largest successful colour plate book of 19th-century America.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Geoffrey Chaucer, The Works (Kelmscott Press, 1896). One of the finest illustrated books ever produced.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Lev Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (Moscow, 1879):<br>first edition in book form of the celebrated novel.
  • <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Manuscripts
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Miniatures
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Early Printed Books
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Jason Master, Haarlem, c. 1475-80
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Boucicaut Master, Paris, c. 1415
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Rohan Master, probably Troyes, c. 1415-20
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Julius Caesar, De bello Gallico, manuscript on vellum, Milan, c. 1450-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Biblia Latina, Paris, 1476-77, first edition of the Vulgate printed in France
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Ludolph of Saxony, Vie du Christ, illuminated by the Master of the Chronique Scandaleuse, 1506-08
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b><br>King David, miniature on vellum, Bologna, c. 1470
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Christ calling St. Peter, miniature on vellum, by Pellegrino di Mariano Rossini, Siena, 1471
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Presentation in Temple, miniature on vellum, Nuremberg, c. 1490-1500
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Bible, illuminated in the <i>primo stile</i>, Bologna, c. 1250-70
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Valturio, De re militari, Verona 1483, first edition in Italian
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Celestial vision at Constantinople, single-leaf woodcut, Nuremberg,<br>c. 1490-91

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - May - 2013 Issue

The American Revolution in Manuscript from Joe Rubinfine

Rubinfine173

Manuscripts from the American Revolution.

Joe Rubinfine has published a catalogue entitled The American Revolution in Manuscript. While the Revolution was much more than a war of words, it was through handwritten words that the news of events was relayed. This collection is filled with accounts as they happened, mostly from officers who participated in its battles, or political leaders who planned strategy. They range from the lesser known officers whose roles were nonetheless important to the cause's success, to the highest ranking of leaders, George Washington himself. This was a time of great sacrifice, but ultimately great triumph. Here is a look back at those days in the words of the participants.

Item 23 is a document signed by British General James Grant, dated December 13, 1776. It proclaims, “I do Certifie that the Bearer John Carter has taken the oath agreeable to the Proclamation of 30th Novr. 1776.” That proclamation was Sir William Howe's offer of amnesty and pardon to everyone who swore allegiance to the King. This offer was part of England's attempt to pacify New Jersey. These documents are scarce, and Rubinfine has a likely explanation. Once the tide of the war turned the other way, it is unlikely that many of those who signed up would have wanted to possess these things any longer. They probably quietly found their way to the fireplace. Priced at $2,500.

Speaking of switching sides, no one is more the epitome of a side-switching double crosser than Benedict Arnold. A prickly, vain, and greedy man, he was nonetheless brave in combat and a successful leader for the patriots in the early years of the Revolution. His personality turned many of his fellow leaders against him even before he became a turncoat, but his success in the field retained one strong advocate in his corner – George Washington. It helped him survive long enough to be caught in the act. Item 1 is a muster roll for the First Pennsylvania Regiment dated December 9, 1778. It is signed by Arnold and several other officers, including Col. Lewis Nicola. Nicola is the officer who wrote Washington suggesting he become King of America, to which the General replied in a most emphatic negative. Washington had appointed Arnold as commander of Philadelphia earlier that year, and Arnold had begun using his position to advance his financial self-interest. This would in turn lead to conflicts with others, more resentment from the ever-resentful Arnold, and his selling out his country. At the time of this letter, it is likely that Arnold had begun to consider his options as he was already lamenting the condition of the country, as well as his own, though it is unlikely he would have taken any action yet or fully made up his mind. $17,500.

By the time of this letter, June 8, 1780, Arnold was already deep into spying. He was still in Philadelphia, angrier than ever. He had been court-martialed for financial actions, though his treason was still unknown. He was now under consideration for command at West Point, which would come in less than two months, and he was about to travel to Connecticut to sell his home, a means of converting assets to cash he could then send to England. This letter is to Philadelphia printer David Claypoole, and it is filled with treasonous irony. Arnold tells Claypoole he will receive some proofs from General Washington, which he should seal up as soon as printed, “& use every precaution to prevent their being made Public...” Arnold should have taken such precautions himself. What was being printed was a notice to French Canadians to be prepared for a French-American invasion of Canada. While pretending to preserve their secrecy, Arnold had already informed the British in New York of the planned attack. What not even Arnold realized was that this “attack” was just a ruse meant to divert British resources away from the real action. Item 2. $22,500.

Rare Book Monthly


Review Search

Archived Reviews

Ask Questions