• <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015, San Francisco</b>
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b> MIGUEL COSTANSO. 1741-1814. The suppressed report of the portala expidition. US$ 80,000-120,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b> FELIPE DE NEVE. 1724-1784. FIRST LAWS OF CALIFORNIA. US$ 120,000-180,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b> JAMES O. PATTIE. c.1804-c.1850. The Personal Narrative of James O. Pattie of Kentucky. US$ 30,000-50,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b><br>KARL BODMER. 1809-1893. Pehriska-Ruhpa, Moennitarri Warrior in the Costume of the Dog Danse.<br>US$ 20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015, San Francisco</b>
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b><br>JOEL PALMER. 1810-1881. Journal of Travels over the Rocky Mountains to the Mouth of the Columbia River. US$ 15,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b><br>JOHANN AUGUSTUS SUTTER. 1803-1880. Letter Signed ("JA Sutter").<br>US$ 15,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b> J. ELY SHERWOOD. California: Her Wealth and Resources... US$ 15,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b> [JOHN LINVILLE HALL and GEORGE G. WEBSTER.] Journal of the Hartford Union Mining and Trading Company. US$ 15,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b> JAMES A. READ and DONALD F. READ, illustrators. Journey to the Gold Diggins. By Jeremiah Saddlebags. US$ 8,000-12,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b> WILLIAM BESCHKE. The Dreadful Sufferings and Thrilling Adventures of an Overland Party of Emigrants to California. US$ 15,000-25,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b> LORENZO D. ALDRICH. 1818/1819-1851. A Journal of the Overland Route to California! US$ 25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams 9 Feb 2015:</b> JOHN WOODHOUSE AUDUBON. 1812-1862. Illustrated Notes of an Expedition Through Mexico and California. US$ 80,000-120,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Gold mining boomtown collection of 23 photos<br>of Goldfield, Nevada (1905)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Columbus and New World Exploration manuscript (1512)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> A. J. Russell.<br>The Great West (1869) 50 original mounted photos
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Isaac Newton. <i>Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica</i> (1687).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Shakespeare's <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies</i> (1632).
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. John Rockefeller. Ambrotype, the earliest known photograph of Rockefeller.
    <b>19th Century Shop</b>. Muybridge, <i>Animal Locomotion</i> (1887) subscriber's copy.
  • Click image to preview catalog.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b><br>Lot 19. John James Audubon. Grey Fox, Plate 21. Est. $20,000-22,000. Retail: $48,000
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 51. American Bison (female), Plate 57. Est. $15,000-20,000. Retail: $47,500
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b><br>Lot 54. John James Audubon. Silver Fox, Plate 116, the hardest to find of Audubon's Quadruped. Est. $25,000-30,000. Retail: $45,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 58. John James Audubon. Ocelot, Plate 86, one of Audubon's four great cats. Est. $12,000-18,000. Retail: $45,000.
    Click image to preview catalog.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 59. John James Audubon Jaguar, Plate 101, another of Audubon's four great cats. Est. $12,000-18,000.<br>Retail: $42,500.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 62. John James Audubon. Common Mouse, Plate 90, Audubon's Great Genre Scene. Est. $10,000-15,000.<br>Retail: $35,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 74. John James Audubon. Armadillo, Plate 146. Est. $7,000-10,000.<br>Retail: $17,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 86. John James Audubon. Grizzly Bear, Plate 131. Est. $8,000-10,000.<br>Retail: $18,000.
    Click image to preview catalog.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 89. John James Audubon. Cougar (Female and Young), Plate 97. Est. $10,000-12,000. Retail: $25,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 95. John James Audubon. Common Deer, Plate 136, Audubon's Most Arresting Composition. Est. $20,000-30,000. Retail: $42,500.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 142. Karl Bodmer. Pehriska-Ruhpa, A Minatarre or Big-Bellied Indian. Est. $8,000-10,000. Retail: $22,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 144. Karl Bodmer. Bison-Dance of the Mandan Indians. Est. $10,000-12,000. Retail: $20,000.
    Click image to preview catalog.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 145. Karl Bodmer. shi-chida and maschi karehde, Mandan indians. Est. $10,000-12,000. Retail: $25,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 156. Karl Bodmer. Fort Union on the Missouri. Est. $10,000-12,000.<br>Retail: $18,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 157. Karl Bodmer. Junction of the Yellowstone River with the Missouri. Est. $8,000-10,000. Retail: $18,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries Feb 28th:</b> Lot 159. Karl Bodmer. View of the rocky mountains. Est. $8,000-10,000. Retail: $18,000.
  • <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 9. <i>Ortelius, Typus Orbis Terrarum</i>, 1598. Est. $7000-$9000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 11. Ritter, <i>[Sundial World Map]</i>, 1640. Est. $12000-$14000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 42. Doppelmayr/Homann, <i><br>[Lot of 6] Globi Coelestis in Tabulas Planas Redacti Pars I-VI</i>, 1730.<br>Est. $3500-$4500
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 56. Yaggy, <i>Yaggy's Geographical Portfolio</i>, 1893. Est. $2000-$3000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 57. Waldseemuller/Fries, <i>E.<br>Tabula Terre Nova F.D.W.</i> Western Hemisphere, America, Atlantic Ocean, 1522. Est. $19500-$21000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 60. Jodocus Hondius/Joannes Jansson, <i>America Noviter Delineata</i>, 1632. Est. $10000-$12000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 198. John C. Russell, <i>Plan of the City of Washington, in the Territory of Columbia</i>, 1795. Est. $3000-$3750
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 386. John Speed, <i>A New Mappe<br>of the Romane Empire</i>, 1626.<br>Est. $1800-$2100
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 391. Blaeu, <i>Britannia Prout Divisa suit Temporibus Anglo-Saxonum</i>, 1645. Est. $3000-$4000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 598. Blaeu, <i>Asia Noviter Delineata</i>, 1631. Est. $4750-$6000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 754. Sanson, <i>L'Asie en Plusieurs Cartes Nouvelles</i>, 1658.<br>Est. $3500-$4250
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 755. Ptolemy/Mercator, <i>Orbis Antiqui Tabulae Geographicae Secundum Cl. Ptolemaeum</i>, 1730.<br>Est. $5500-$6500
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 761. <i>Colton, Colton's General Atlas Containing One Hundred and Seventy Steel Plate Maps and Plans</i>, 1857.<br>Est. $2500-$3250
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 763. Everts, <i>The Official State Atlas of Kansas from Government Surveys</i>, 1887. Est. $4500-$6000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 765. U.S. War Department, <i>Atlas to Accompany the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies</i>, 1891. Est. $2400-$3000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 4-18): </b><br>Lot 773. Carver, <i>Travels Through the Interior Parts of North America</i>, 1779. Est. $2000-$2300

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - December - 2012 Issue

48 Varied Items from The Pages of Yesteryear

Pagesyes48

48.

The Pages of Yesteryear issued a catalogue a little while back with the succinct title 48. It was named, not sequentially for catalogues, but for years in business. This represents their 48th year in business, almost as old as books themselves. The items offered are an unusual mix. There are books and various ephemeral items – letters, broadsides, account books, typescripts and such. These provide a glimpse at life a century or two ago. Times have changed. Let's take a look.

Item 2 is a testament to amazing technological advances at another time of rapid technical change, the turn of the 20th (rather than 21st) century. It is a Souvenir Program of the International Aviation Tournament Belmont Park, Oct. 22-30, 1910. Most people associate New York's Belmont Park with horse racing, but for a few years, that was banned. Instead, for a few days in October, it featured airplane races. Obviously not around the track, but a race went from Belmont around the Statue of Liberty and back. The winning time was 35 minutes. Another race was won by accomplishing an average speed of 61 miles per hour. A record altitude of 9,714 feet was achieved. The program lists the events and competitors and includes several photographs. Among those who participated were Wilbur and Orville Wright. That brings us to what is so amazing about this meet. It took place just seven years after the Wright Brothers' first air flight, a 12-second journey of 120 feet at a speed of 6.8 mph and an altitude of 10 feet. Progress can be astonishing. Priced at $250.

Here is a letter the Wright Brothers might have appreciated. It is a four-page letter from a boy named “Nattie” to his “Dear Papa,” dated March 10, 1878, from Boston. In it, he talks about bicycles. Bicycle manufacturing was the Wright Brothers profession before they moved to aviation. Nattie was impressed by some men riding their “bicicles,” noting, “There is a rubber band goes around the outside of both wheels (rubber tires?)...they don't make a bit of noise...they have a little brake...and the man who rides on it can stop it just as quick as you can wink.” He notes the cost ranges from $80-$150. Item 4. $150.

Dentistry is not a particularly pleasant subject today, but at least it isn't the horror it was in 1875, the time of this dentist's account book. No high speed drills, novocaine, or much else to relieve the horror of a visit. At least Horace Mason Perkins appears to have had a bit of a sense of humor, though perhaps unintentionally, as he described his customers' creditworthiness. Perkins attended the Harvard Dental School in 1898 and received a DDS in 1908 from Tufts, which may make you wonder why he was practicing dentistry in 1875. He also received degrees from the Philadelphia Dental College in 1869 and Boston Dental College in 1870. I have no idea whether he was a good dentist, but at least he was a well-educated one. Among his comments on various customers' credit, he writes such things as “good as gold,” “[pays] cash – nice old lady,” “never known to pay bill,” “Good but doesn't come on time.” For one family he writes, “Look out for the Fox family - no good – especially G P Fox who is a loafer.” As for the “Portuguese from Cohasset,” they are hard to please and will beat you down, but if you stick to your price, they will give it to you. His pricing includes 50 cents for an extraction, but $1 if you want gas or to have it done in your home, $1 for a silver filling but $2-$3 for gold, 50 cents for killing a nerve, and $20 for a full lower plate. Item 14. $250.

Item 38 is a scathing attack on the Union Pacific Railroad from 1869, the year the transcontinental railroad was completed. The author is Chauncey H. Snow, government director for the Union Pacific under President Andrew Johnson. This report is titled Preliminary Report to the President of the United States on the Location, Construction, and Management of the Union Pacific Railroad. He criticizes the “grading, bridges, curves, location, corruption in management and in Congress, and pretty much everything connected to the Union Pacific in his 17 pages,” Pages of Yesteryear tells us. He also mentions Credit Mobilier, the company involved in a major scandal in the just beginning Grant administration. Snow concludes that he knows his report will “bring upon me enmity of persons in high official positions – of persons controlling unlimited capital...but I must do my duty.” A selfless public servant was Mr. Snow. The pamphlet is dated March 10, 1869, but that has been corrected in pencil to read March 5. That is correct, as the report was handed in to President Grant, who took office the previous day, on March 5. The following day, Grant replaced him. However, before getting too sympathetic for the idealistic Mr. Snow, or assuming this is evidence of early corruption in the Grant administration, according to the book Union Pacific by Maury Klein from 1987, Snow produced two reports on the Union Pacific, one favorable, one unfavorable. He was willing to submit the favorable one for the right compensation. When he did not receive it, he submitted the bad one. At various times, Snow reportedly sought cash or a coal supply contract from the railroad, threatening to provide harmful information if he was not paid off. $125.

Tornadoes are nothing new to the Midwest. Last year, we saw the terrible destructive force in Joplin, Missouri, and before that, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Here is a photo account of a similarly terrible storm a century ago: Omaha Cyclone in Pictures, Easter Sunday, March 23, 1913. It was not a happy Easter in Omaha that year. A line of intense storms spawned a series of tornadoes. A very bad one made its way into Omaha. The tornado was not only powerful, but wide, increasing the damage. Houses, including wooden ones from poorer neighborhoods and brick ones from wealthier ones, were destroyed. One hundred fifty people were killed, another 400 injured. This booklet contains 30 pages of pictures, one of text, and one of advertising. Item 32. $75.

The Pages of Yesteryear may be reached at 203-426-0864 or jrenjilian@hotmail.com.

Rare Book Monthly


Review Search

Archived Reviews

Ask Questions