• <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 95. The Hours of the Cross, Use of Metz in Latin. Est. £40000–60000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 86. The Mckell Medical Almanack, in German [Alsace, c .1445]. £60000–80000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 87. Psalter for Dominican Use, in Latin and German. Est. £25000–35000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 88. Sermon collection, in Latin, 220 leaves, Illuminated manuscript on parchment. Est. £15000–20000.
    <b>Bloomsbury: Western Manuscripts & Miniatures, 08 July 2015.</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 100. Book of Hours, Use of Rome, with numerous other devotional texts, in Latin and French. Est. £30000–50000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 62. St. Denis holding his severed head, large miniature on a leaf from a Book of Hours, in Latin. Est. £4000–6000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 54. The Annunciation to the Virgin, large miniature on a leaf from a Book of Hours. Est. £4000–6000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 53.<br>A Physician with Two Amputees, miniature from an early copy of Bartholomaeus Anglicanus.<br>Est. £8000–12000.
    <b>Bloomsbury: Western Manuscripts & Miniatures, 08 July 2015.</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 10.<br>Isaiah, fragment of a leaf from a monumental Carolingian Bible, in Latin. Est. £15000–20000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 14. The<br>relic list of Bishop Werinharius of Merseburg, from a Romanesque manuscript. Est. £8000–12000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 8. Fragment from the earliest copy of St. Augustine. Est. £20000–30000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 7. Latin text, most probably an official document, on papyrus. [Egypt or perhaps Italy, probably first century BC.-first century AD.] Est. £8000–12000.
  • Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 1. Watercolor painting of a church by Adolf Hitler. US$ 15000-20000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 207. SS Honor Goblet presented to SS-Hauptstrumfuhrer Gerhald Pleiss. US$ 10000-15000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 380. "The Goring Telegram". Hermann Goring's Telegram to Hilter advising he would assume control of the Reich. US$ 15000-20000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 381. First public knowledge that Germany had surrendered - Teletype print-out and punch tape from the Pentagon's war message room.<br>US$ 8000-10000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 721. Breeches buoy life fring from the sinking of the R.M.S. LUSITANIA. US$ 10000-12000
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 759. Japanese body armor ca. 16th-17th century. US$ 10000-12000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 935. Union lieutenant colonel's uniform jacket. US$ 5000-7000
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 937. A surgeon's boxed set of amputation implements possibly used during and after the battle of Gettysburg. US$ 4000-5000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 1106. Black Voters Are Disenfranchised In Pennsylvania. Constitutional convention of 1837<br>in November 1838. US$ 300-400.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 1133. "Alaska Views" Klondike photo albums (2). US$ 5000-8000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions:<br>Lot 1253. Kaiser Wilhelm II personally owned and worn Garde Hussar pelzmuetze ("busby")... <br> US$ 15000-20000.
    Alexander Historical Auctions: Lot 1459A. Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat original art - mutually executed and signed fingerprint cards. US$ 12000-15000.
  • <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0110.<br>John James Audubon. <i>Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> The Birds of America from Drawings. Est. $10,000-15,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0116. Letter from John James Audubon to Robert Havell, His Engraver, signed "John J. Audubon", 1839. Est. $4,000-6,000.
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0141. George Washington Revolutionary War, 1779 letter to Brigadier General James Clinton. Est. $20,000-30,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0142.<br>Thomas Jefferson letter, 1802. One page letter written to his master carpenter, James Dinsmore.<br>Est. $15,000-25,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0170. William Bligh's <i>A Narrative of the Mutiny on Board His Majesty's Ship Bounty</i>.<br>Est. 15,000-20,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0181. <i>Georgia Scenes Characters, Incidents, Etc.</i>, by Augustus Baldwin Longstreet. <br>Est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0190.<br>[Hariot’s Virginia] <i>Wunderbarliche</i> doch Warhafftige Erklärung. Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0200. FDR’s copy of <i>The American Traveller; or Guide to the United States</i> by H. S. Tanner, 1837, with Franklin D. Roosevelt's ownership signature. Est. $500-800
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0205. Fine Pair English Globes John & William Cary London, 1800. Est. $15,000-25,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0220. Maris Pacicici [quod vulgo Mar del] by Abrahamus Ortelius, Antwerp, 1589. Est. $3,000-5,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0263. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell [signed]. Est. $2,000-4,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey. First Edition, signed. Est. $2,000-4,000
  • <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 1.<br>THE RESURRECTION, large historiated initial on a leaf from an Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum.<br>£40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 2. RAYMOND OF PENYAFORT (1175-1275), <i>Quia tractare intendimus</i>, with Tables of Consanquinity and Affinity. £30,000-£50,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 6. The Lamb in the Mist of the Elders, and the Opening of the Book, two miniatures. £40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 7. <br>The Prophet Nahum and A Man Playing an Organ, two historiated initials on a leaf of a Bible in Latin.<br>£50,000-£80,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 20. The <i>'Gospels of Queen Theutberga'</i> in Latin, Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum. £1,000,000-£1,500,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 26. <i>Book of Hours</i>, use of Metz, in Latin and French, Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum. £80,000-£120,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 51. SHEPARD, E. H. (1879-1976) and<br>A. A. MILNE (1882-1956). <i>Vespers</i>. £30,000-£50,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 83. DANTE ALIGHIERI (1265-1321). <i>La Commedia</i>. Commentary by Cristoforo Landino. £40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 106. FRITH, Francis (1822-1898). <i>Egypt, Sinai, and Jerusalem: Series of Twenty Photo ...</i> £80,000-£120,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 114. MAN RAY (1890-1976). An album of gelatin silver prints, c.1920-c.1930. £60,000-£90,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 150. MERIAN, Maria Sibylla (1647-1717). <i>Neues Blumenbuch</i>. Nuremberg: Johann Andreas Graff, 1680. £200,000-£300,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 157. WEINMANN, Johann Wilhelm (1683-1741). <i>Phytanthoza iconographia; sive Conspectus aliquot millium ...</i> £70,000-£100,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - December - 2012 Issue

The First Catalogue from Honey and Wax Booksellers

Honeywax1

The first catalogue from Honey & Wax.

This month we received our first catalogue from Honey & Wax Booksellers of Brooklyn, New York. It is an unusual catalogue, with fold-out covers and wording on the cover I can't quite figure out whether it is the title or company motto. Either way, here it is: Use Books as Bees Use Flowers. Hm...let's see.. ah ha – they devour the nectar! That's my interpretation. Could be wrong. Honey and Wax is a fairly new book firm, but is operated by Heather O'Donnell, who brings years of experience in the trade. This is their first catalogue, but we hope to see many more. Traditional printed catalogues remain an important part of bookselling, even if this one is a bit untraditional in appearance.

In the introduction, headed “This is a story about the way we read now,” Ms. O'Donnell notes that paper books “are no longer our primary means of conveying information, and probably never will be again.” True enough, but how then do we preserve our heritage? That is a question future generations will have to answer as they delete old books from their electronic readers. Fortunately, we still have over five centuries worth of printed books to hold, cherish, and pass down to future generations. As she further observes, “They [books] satisfy our desire to own and handle well-made objects, to live among them, to give each other something lasting, rather than simply clicking 'share.'”

Honey & Wax booksellers specializes in literature, “with the occasional foray into the arts, specializing in unique copies: books from the libraries of writers and artists, rare first printings, quirky vintage editions, splendidly bound copies, books with no downloadable equivalent.” Here are a few from this first Honey & Wax catalogue.

We will start with what could fairly be called the first piece of English literature, as printed by the greatest of the fine private presses. This is the Tale of Beowulf, author unknown, perhaps dating to as early as the 8th century. It survived in a single manuscript, but did not make it to the press until the early 19th century. This copy is from the limited edition of 308 copies off William Morris' Kelmscott Press, hence its familiar name as the Kelmscott Beowulf. This work was a “labor of love” for Morris. The work was translated to prose by A.J. Wyatt, and then Morris returned the translated text to poetry, as was the original. Morris said of Beowulf, it was “the first and the best poem of the English race, [with] no author but the people.” He also claimed it was one of his most expensive productions and he lost money on the project. If he could have waited another 117 years (it was published in 1895), Morris would have done just fine. This copy includes the “Note to Reader” that was tipped in to it. Item 55. Priced at $8,200.

It is not unusual to see poets come off the mean streets, or the bohemian neighborhoods of cities. Rarely do they come from the executive offices of insurance companies. What rhymes with “amortization?” Wallace Stevens began working at the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company in 1916, seven years before his first book of poetry was published, and would continue to do so for the remainder of his life, rising to Vice-President. On the side, he wrote poetry, and that is what he is remembered for today, not writing insurance policies. His reputation, though modest at first, grew with time, and he received a Pulitzer Prize in 1955, the year he died, for a collection of poetry. Item 36 is a first edition, first issue, first binding of Stevens' first book, Harmonium, published in 1923. The full-time insurance man was already 44 years old by then. This copy contains the bookplate of Annie Eliot Trumbull. Ms. Trumbull was a writer and Connecticut neighbor of Stevens who introduced him to the literary circles of the area in the days before he was a published writer. $6,200.

Items 73-80 are eight separate broadside promotions for Shakespearean plays in London, New York, and Philadelphia. They date from 1810-1857. Many featured the most notable actors and actresses of their day. The actress Mrs. Jordan makes her appearance on a broadside as well as on stage. Along with being a notable actress, she was even better known as the longtime mistress of the future King William IV. William was not expected to ever be King when he and Mrs. Jordan were together, so he was free to carry on his affairs as he pleased. Carry on his affairs he did, William and Mrs. Jordan having ten children together between 1794 and 1807. They broke up in 1811, and William became King in 1830. When William died in 1837, the crown passed to his niece, Victoria, since, ironically, he had no children (“legitimate” ones, that is). Another broadside features the greatest American Shakespearean actor of the mid-19th century, Edwin Forrest. The rivalry between Forrest and his working class and immigrant fans, against British Shakespearean actor William Macready and his upper class fans, led to the terrible Astor Place Riot of 1849. Followers of each fought each other outside the Astor Opera House, 20-30 people dying in the ensuing melee. Shakespeare would have been... dumbfounded? These 8 broadsides are priced from $500-$850 each.

Rare Book Monthly


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