• <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 95. The Hours of the Cross, Use of Metz in Latin. Est. £40000–60000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 86. The Mckell Medical Almanack, in German [Alsace, c .1445]. £60000–80000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 87. Psalter for Dominican Use, in Latin and German. Est. £25000–35000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 88. Sermon collection, in Latin, 220 leaves, Illuminated manuscript on parchment. Est. £15000–20000.
    <b>Bloomsbury: Western Manuscripts & Miniatures, 08 July 2015.</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 100. Book of Hours, Use of Rome, with numerous other devotional texts, in Latin and French. Est. £30000–50000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 62. St. Denis holding his severed head, large miniature on a leaf from a Book of Hours, in Latin. Est. £4000–6000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 54. The Annunciation to the Virgin, large miniature on a leaf from a Book of Hours. Est. £4000–6000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 53.<br>A Physician with Two Amputees, miniature from an early copy of Bartholomaeus Anglicanus.<br>Est. £8000–12000.
    <b>Bloomsbury: Western Manuscripts & Miniatures, 08 July 2015.</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 10.<br>Isaiah, fragment of a leaf from a monumental Carolingian Bible, in Latin. Est. £15000–20000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 14. The<br>relic list of Bishop Werinharius of Merseburg, from a Romanesque manuscript. Est. £8000–12000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 8. Fragment from the earliest copy of St. Augustine. Est. £20000–30000.
    <b>Bloomsbury, July 8:</b> Lot 7. Latin text, most probably an official document, on papyrus. [Egypt or perhaps Italy, probably first century BC.-first century AD.] Est. £8000–12000.
  • <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0110.<br>John James Audubon. <i>Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> The Birds of America from Drawings. Est. $10,000-15,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0116. Letter from John James Audubon to Robert Havell, His Engraver, signed "John J. Audubon", 1839. Est. $4,000-6,000.
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0141. George Washington Revolutionary War, 1779 letter to Brigadier General James Clinton. Est. $20,000-30,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0142.<br>Thomas Jefferson letter, 1802. One page letter written to his master carpenter, James Dinsmore.<br>Est. $15,000-25,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0170. William Bligh's <i>A Narrative of the Mutiny on Board His Majesty's Ship Bounty</i>.<br>Est. 15,000-20,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0181. <i>Georgia Scenes Characters, Incidents, Etc.</i>, by Augustus Baldwin Longstreet. <br>Est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0190.<br>[Hariot’s Virginia] <i>Wunderbarliche</i> doch Warhafftige Erklärung. Est. $50,000-70,000.
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0200. FDR’s copy of <i>The American Traveller; or Guide to the United States</i> by H. S. Tanner, 1837, with Franklin D. Roosevelt's ownership signature. Est. $500-800
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0205. Fine Pair English Globes John & William Cary London, 1800. Est. $15,000-25,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0220. Maris Pacicici [quod vulgo Mar del] by Abrahamus Ortelius, Antwerp, 1589. Est. $3,000-5,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot 0263. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell [signed]. Est. $2,000-4,000
    <b>Brunk Auctions:</b> Lot One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey. First Edition, signed. Est. $2,000-4,000
  • <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 1.<br>THE RESURRECTION, large historiated initial on a leaf from an Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum.<br>£40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 2. RAYMOND OF PENYAFORT (1175-1275), <i>Quia tractare intendimus</i>, with Tables of Consanquinity and Affinity. £30,000-£50,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 6. The Lamb in the Mist of the Elders, and the Opening of the Book, two miniatures. £40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 7. <br>The Prophet Nahum and A Man Playing an Organ, two historiated initials on a leaf of a Bible in Latin.<br>£50,000-£80,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 20. The <i>'Gospels of Queen Theutberga'</i> in Latin, Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum. £1,000,000-£1,500,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 26. <i>Book of Hours</i>, use of Metz, in Latin and French, Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum. £80,000-£120,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 51. SHEPARD, E. H. (1879-1976) and<br>A. A. MILNE (1882-1956). <i>Vespers</i>. £30,000-£50,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 83. DANTE ALIGHIERI (1265-1321). <i>La Commedia</i>. Commentary by Cristoforo Landino. £40,000-£60,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July 2015. Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography.</b>
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 106. FRITH, Francis (1822-1898). <i>Egypt, Sinai, and Jerusalem: Series of Twenty Photo ...</i> £80,000-£120,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 114. MAN RAY (1890-1976). An album of gelatin silver prints, c.1920-c.1930. £60,000-£90,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 150. MERIAN, Maria Sibylla (1647-1717). <i>Neues Blumenbuch</i>. Nuremberg: Johann Andreas Graff, 1680. £200,000-£300,000.
    <b>Christie's London, 15 July:</b> Lot 157. WEINMANN, Johann Wilhelm (1683-1741). <i>Phytanthoza iconographia; sive Conspectus aliquot millium ...</i> £70,000-£100,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's London July 14: English Literature, History, Children's Books & Illustrations.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> ENGLISH CIVIL WAR. A collection of 23 phamplets. £4,000-£6,000.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> CARROLL, LEWIS. Complete set of five watercolour drawnings for 'Songs from Alice in Wonderland'. £5,000-£7,000.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> BONAPARTE, NAPOLEON. Lock of <br>his hair mounted on paper. <br> £5,000-£7,000.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>The Decent of Man</i>, Inscribed by Darwin for his daughter. £20,000-£30,000.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14: English Literature, History, Children's Books & Illustrations.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> [FLEMING, Alexander]. Presentation sample of the mould that produces penicillin. £7,000-£10,000.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> GRAHAME, Kenneth--Wolfendale, Timothy. <i>The Wind in the Willows</i>. £7,000-£9,000.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> BIBLE. NEW TESTAMENT. English, Tyndale's Version. £25,000-£35,000.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b><br>Byron, George Gordon Noel, Lord. Autographed Letter Signed, to Earl of Blessington. £10,000-£15,000.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14: English Literature, History, Children's Books & Illustrations.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> [BRONTE, Charlotte]. 2 watercolours of the flowers attributed to Charlotte Bronte. C.1839. £4,000-£6,000.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> CRUIKSHANK, George. Album of letters, watercolours, sketches... £6,000-£8,000.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> WORDSWORTH, William. Catalogue of the varied and valuable Historical Poetical. £6,000-£7,500.
    <b>Sotheby's London July 14th.</b> BEARDSLEY, Aubrey--MALORY, Sir Thomas. Le Morte Darthur. <i>Dent</i>, 1893-94. £25,000-£30,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - August - 2012 Issue

Miscellaneous Oddities from Garrett Scott, Bookseller

Scott38

Catalogue 38 from Garrett Scott.

Garrett Scott, Bookseller, recently published Catalogue 38, Miscellaneous Acquisitions. Scott's material is mostly shorter form, pamphlets, brochures, advertisements and the like. Most are American, but crazy Brits and a few from the continent make occasional appearances. Not all of the items Scott presents are weird, but certainly that is a hallmark of material in a Scott catalogue. There are always a good share of works written by crackpots, medical quacks, con-artists, strange preachers, and various others from the borderline of sanity. For those who collect the unusual, there is nothing quite like a Garrett Scott catalogue. Here are a few items from this latest edition.

We start with a printed typescript letter from Harry Hoxsey to the Food and Drug Administration dated 1957. Hoxsey practiced what Scott refers to kindly as “popular medicine.” Others would call him a quack and a charlatan. Hoxsey possessed a supposed cure for cancer, handed down through his family from his great-grandfather. Supposedly, his great-grandfather had observed a horse cure itself of a tumor by eating certain plants in a field. He concocted an herbal remedy, which his great-grandson, who proved to be a fantastic self-promoter, turned into an enormous business. At one time, he had 23 clinics across the U.S.A., the largest in Dallas. However, the FDA and various professional medical groups such as the American Medical Association and American Cancer Society went after Hoxsey. He was never able to provide any verifiable evidence that his treatment ever cured anyone, but Hoxsey developed a great marketing tool. He attacked the FDA and medical groups that pointed out the shortcomings of his treatment. As such he was able to develop a following of conspiracy theorists who supported him (and do to this day). In language sure to appeal to those who distrust the government, Hoxsey writes, “I fully realize how easy it is for you to sit in your Washington 'Ivory Tower' and condemn me.” Condemn him they did, and by 1960, Hoxsey was forced to shut down all of his U.S. clinics. He moved to Tijuana, Mexico, where his clinic is still in operation today. As for Harry Hoxsey, he developed prostate cancer in 1967 and his herbal formula was not able to save him. Item 41. Priced at $50.

I'm all for recycling, but this makes me a bit squeamish. As even the author, Dr. John Parkin admits, “It may, perhaps, be considered by some persons that the present is not a very pleasant, or very delicate subject to discuss.” The title of this 1862 book is The Utilisation of the Sewage of Towns. This British solution to the problem of disposal of sewage, including human waste, was to divert it to fields to help crops grow. Unlike “gray water” uses of treated sewage today, the idea was to use the untreated sewage as fertilizer. Item 55. $125.

Those struggles you have trying to figure out how to use your smart phone are nothing new. A century ago, people had to learn how to use the basic, most rudimentary telephone. Fortunately, the telephone company provided help in this 1896 telephone book for Pittsburgh. For example, what does one say when answering the phone? This was all new. Here is what you should do - “answer by voice 'Who wants -----?' giving your name.” Subscribers are encouraged to be efficient with their use of phone time. “Promptness and reliability are of the utmost importance, and we urge subscribers not to permit the wires to be occupied by unnecessary conversation, singing, &c.” That warning against “unnecessary conversation” sure fell by the wayside. And, there were some things that could get your telephone service terminated, such as using it “for any purpose other than respectful, BONA FIDE business or social messages.” At least they didn't have to warn subscribers not to text while driving. Item 18. $125.

Some writers are so clear in their thoughts that there is no need attempting to describe what they say. Quotations say it best. As H(enry) S. Humphreys points out in The Cylindriad...Published in the Cordelian Quarterly (1942) - “There is no place in this joyous-tragic world for misogyny. It is an anomaly like anti-cylindric cubism, Schoenbergian cacophony, surrealism, the madhouse-language of Earwicker. . . Just as an unprincipled Mme de Warren can destroy the delicate character of a boy Rousseau, so can a Lilith-succuba of plutocracy destroy the nobility of men who yearn to be doers of good in their own civilisation: I am thinking of those willowy ladies often photographed by Cecil Beaton whose insatiable desire for baubles and champagne-bubbles is a hellborn, bottomless pit that not all the plebeian flesh of the world could fill up.” Couldn't have said it better. Item 42. $125.

Rare Book Monthly


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