• <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE GUTENBERG BIBLE, MAINZ. Price realized: $5,390,000. Oct 1987, NY.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> LEONARDO DA VINCI, Codex Hammer. Price realized: $30,802,500. Nov 1994 NY
    <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE FORBES COLLECTION, Price realized: $40,900,000. Mar 2002, New York.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> ANDRE FRANQUIN, SPIROU ET FANTASIO. Price realized: €157,500. Apr 2014, Paris, France.
    <b>London, King Street: 27 May 2015</b>
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE GREAT HOURS OF GALEAZZO MARIA SFORZA. Price realized: £1,217,250. Jul 2011, London.
    <b>CHRISTIE'S EXCEPTIONAL PRICES:</b> THE ROTHSCHILD PRAYERBOOK. A Book of Hours, use of Rome, in Latin. Price realized: $13,605,000.
  • <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Bartolus, Super Prima Parte Infortiati (Venice, 1478). See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England (Philadelphia, 1771-73). First American edition. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book<br>Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Blackstone, The Great Charter (Oxford, 1759). First edition. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Boniface VIII, Liber Sextus Decretalium (Venice, 1491). In a remarkable binding. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Darrow, Autograph Letter, Signed (February 26, c.1930). See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Dugdale, Origines Juridiciales (London, 1671). Extra-illustrated on 138 leaves. See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Gratian, Decretus Gratiani (Venice, 1514). With 130 woodcuts. See at the 2015 NY ABAA Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Gregory IX, Decretales (Nuremberg, 1482). Koberger imprint with exquisite initials. See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Holmes, Flirtatious Autograph Letter, Signed (Boston, December 4, 1897). See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Jodocus, Vocabularius (Strasburg, 1500) [&] Formulare Registrorum (Leipzig, 1506). See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Story, Commentaries on the Constitution (Boston, 1833). First edition. See at the 2015 NY Antiquarian Book Fair Booth C26.
    <b>Lawbook Exchange: </b>Catalogue 79 - March 2015. Recently Acquired Books, Manuscripts & Ephemera
  • <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Manuscripts
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Miniatures
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Early Printed Books
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b><br>St. Paul’s epistles, manuscript on vellum, illuminated by the Simon Master, c. 1150-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Boucicaut Master, Paris, c. 1415
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Rohan Master, probably Troyes, c. 1415-20
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Julius Caesar, De bello Gallico, manuscript on vellum, Milan, c. 1450-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Bible Historiale, illuminated manuscript in French on paper, Amiens, c. 1480-85
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Miniature Book of Hours, illuminated by Simon Bening, Bruges, c. 1530-35
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Saintly Pope, miniature on vellum, by Pacino da Bonaguida, Florence, c. 1310-15
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Christ calling St. Peter, miniature on vellum, by Pellegrino di Mariano Rossini, Siena, 1471
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Presentation in Temple, miniature on vellum, Nuremberg, c. 1490-1500
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Pliny, Historia naturalis, Treviso: Manzolus, 1479
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Valturio, De re militari, Verona 1483, first edition in Italian
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Celestial vision at Constantinople, single-leaf woodcut, Nuremberg,<br>c. 1490-91
  • <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Latest catalogue: 50 Fine Books 2015
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> M. Catesby,<br>The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands (London, 1729-77).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility (London, 1811). First edition of the Austen’s first published novel.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Koronatsionniy sbornik [Album of Nicholas II's coronation] (St. Petersburg, 1899): preferred deluxe version in Russian.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> A complete set of John Gould's magnificent bird books in attractive contemporary bindings (1831-88).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Andy Warhol, Bald Eagle from Endangered Species. Screenprint in colours, 1983, signed in pencil.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Sir Ernest Shackleton, South: The story of Shackleton’s last expedition 1914-1917 (London, 1919).
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> J.J. Audubon, The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (NY, 1845-54): The largest successful colour plate book of 19th-century America.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Geoffrey Chaucer, The Works (Kelmscott Press, 1896). One of the finest illustrated books ever produced.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Lev Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (Moscow, 1879):<br>first edition in book form of the celebrated novel.

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - January - 2012 Issue

Signed Documents from People You Know, from The Raab Collection

Raab70

Christmas stories by Charles Dickens on the cover of the latest from the Raab Collection.

The Raab Collection has issued a new catalogue, and while that cover might make you think its title was “Christmas Tales,” it is not. That's just a picture of Charles Dickens' Christmas Tales you see. The real title here is simply Catalog 70. Offered are 26 more examples of Raab's specialty – signed documents from important persons. There are presidents and prime ministers, writers and poets, and others of significant importance. There are the greats - Washington, Lincoln, both Roosevelts, Churchill, the not-so greats – Chamberlain, Fillmore, and the both - Napoleon. The pen brings us the likes of Dickens, Byron, Whitman, and Kipling. You will know everyone in this catalogue. Here are a few.

That item you see on the cover is a special collection of Christmas Tales compiled by one Russell “Pa” Browne. It is doubtful any writer is as associated with Christmas as Charles Dickens. There are few better known people who never existed than Ebenezer Scrooge. However, Dickens wrote more holiday material than just A Christmas Carol. He edited a magazine called Household Words, and at Christmas time, he would pen stories for the issue. Browne evidently liked them, and compiled the issues of the magazine and had them bound together. One of them is signed. According to a 1933 note that accompanies this item, “Pa” Browne sent it to Dickens who obliged with his signature. The collection has been in the Browne family ever since. Item 1. Priced at $13,000.

Here is a man forever associated with one of the worst words in politics – appeasement. Neville Chamberlain had a distinguished career, and eventually he led his nation in preparation for, and the initial stages of, the Second World War. However, for too long, he believed that he could preserve the peace by appeasing Hitler, an attempt that only encouraged the German dictator. Chamberlain was a well-meaning and mostly effective leader, but he is mainly remembered for his one giant miscalculation. Item 19 is a letter Chamberlain wrote to Beverley Baxter, a fellow Conservative M.P. and a strong ally of the Prime Minister. The letter is dated June 12, 1939, written after the Munich Pact Chamberlain had negotiated, and after Hitler's invasion of Czechoslovakia, but prior to Germany's invasion of Poland that led Chamberlain and Britain into war. As the letter reveals, Chamberlain was still (unrealistically) hopeful. At one point Chamberlain tells Baxter, “Generally speaking, I should say that Italy is more pacifist than Germany, but neither does Germany want to go to war unless she is obliged.” He was dead wrong about Germany not wanting to go to war. $17,000.

Item 3 is a letter from Abraham Lincoln to General George Meade that makes us realize just how hard prosecuting the war must have been for him. He demanded aggressive prosecution of the Civil War, several times dismissing his generals for proceeding too cautiously and conservatively. Caution may have saved more lives, but to Lincoln, preserving the Union was so vital that the terrible costs had to be expended. However, if anyone thinks that Lincoln's aggressive pursuit displayed even a hint of disregard for human lives, they would completely misunderstand the man. This letter concerned one Allen G. Maxson, a corporal in the Michigan Volunteers. Maxson had been condemned to death for desertion by a court martial in January of 1864, and was scheduled for execution on January 29. They didn't run through a lot of appeals, or wait long in those days. In his letter dated January 14, Lincoln orders Meade to “Suspend execution of the death sentence in the case of Allen G. Maxson...until further order.” Such further order never came. Over the next few months, Maxson's and many other's executions were commuted. Despite the fact that some of his generals did not approve of these commutations, fearing it harmed military discipline, Lincoln could not bear such a penalty for people whose fears overwhelmed them. He hated the loss of life, even though circumstances placed him in a position where he had to send so many out to war at great risk of death. $32,000.

Rare Book Monthly


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