• <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Latest catalogue - The Russian Turmoil 1917-45: An Émigré perspective
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> S. Anichkova, Baroness Taube, [The Enigma of Lenin]. Prague, c. 1934.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> V. Purishkevich [The Diary of State Duma Member Vladimir Mitrofanovich Purishkevich]. Riga, 1924.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> O. Kugusheva [Wolf Pack]. Berlin, 1940.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> B.M. Kuznetsov [To Please Stalin / 1945-1946]. Canada, 1968.
  • <b>Christie's London June 9th: Fine Printed Books and Manuscripts</b>
    <b>Christie's London June 9:</b> CASSATT, Mary (1844-1926). Document signed three times. Est. £3,000-5,000.
    <b>Christie's London June 9:</b> LENNON, John and Yoko ONO. Document signed ('John Lennon'; 'Yoko Ono'). Est. £4,000-6,000.
    <b>Christie's London June 9:</b><br>BOCHIUS, Joannes (1555-1609). Book describes in great detail ... visiting Archduke Albert of Austria and wife. Est. £3,000-5,000.
    <b>Christie's London June 9th: Fine Printed Books and Manuscripts</b>
    <b>Christie's London June 9:</b> CAVENDISH, William, 1st Duke of Newcastle (1592-1676). <i>A General System of Horsemanship in all its Branches.</i> Est. £3,500-4,500.
    <b>Christie's London June 9:</b> FERNÁN GONZÁLEZ,<i>Conde Fernan Gonzalez. Cronica del noble cavallero el conde Fernan Gonçalez.</i> Est. £5,000-£8,000.
    <b>Christie's London June 9:</b><br>SEWELL, Anna (1820-1878). <i>Black Beauty: His Grooms and Companions. The Autobiography of a Horse.</i><br>Est. £4,000-£6,000.
    <b>Christie's London June 9th: Fine Printed Books and Manuscripts</b>
    <b>Christie's London June 9:</b> WISDEN, John. <i>Cricketers' Almanack for 1898.</i> Est. £3,000-5,000.
    <b>Christie's London June 9:</b> IMPERATO, Ferrante (1550-1625). Historia Naturale. Venice: Combi & La Noù. Est. £2,500-3,500.
    <b>Christie's London June 9:</b><br>PEIGNOT, Etienne-Gabriel (1767-1849). Dictionaire raisonné de bibliologie. Paris: vols I-II = Villier, 1802. Est. £8,000-£12,000.
  • <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Manuscripts
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Miniatures
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Selection of Early Printed Books
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Jason Master, Haarlem, c. 1475-80
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Boucicaut Master, Paris, c. 1415
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Book of Hours, illuminated by the Rohan Master, probably Troyes, c. 1415-20
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Julius Caesar, De bello Gallico, manuscript on vellum, Milan, c. 1450-75
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Biblia Latina, Paris, 1476-77, first edition of the Vulgate printed in France
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Ludolph of Saxony, Vie du Christ, illuminated by the Master of the Chronique Scandaleuse, 1506-08
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b><br>King David, miniature on vellum, Bologna, c. 1470
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Christ calling St. Peter, miniature on vellum, by Pellegrino di Mariano Rossini, Siena, 1471
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Presentation in Temple, miniature on vellum, Nuremberg, c. 1490-1500
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Bible, illuminated in the <i>primo stile</i>, Bologna, c. 1250-70
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Valturio, De re militari, Verona 1483, first edition in Italian
    <b>Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books: </b> Celestial vision at Constantinople, single-leaf woodcut, Nuremberg,<br>c. 1490-91
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Catalogue 160: Magnificent Books, Manuscripts, & Photographs
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Shakespeare's First Folio (1623)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Charles Darwin family photograph album
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Spectacular album of mammoth photos of the American West by Watkins & others
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Washington family copy of The Federalist (1788)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Underground Railroad runaway broadside (1857)

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - February - 2011 Issue

Americana in Printing and the Mind of Man from William Reese

Evgetty

It was actually Edward Everett who gave the Gettysburg Address.

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The first printing of the Declaration of Independence ran off the press on July 4, 1776, or early the following day. Over the next couple of weeks, newspaper and broadside printings sped around the nation as the colonists were informed of what their representatives had done in Philadelphia. However, what we envisage as the Declaration of Independence today is not what those colonists saw. There was no exquisite John Hancock signature, just a printing of his name and one other, Secretary Charles Thompson, at the bottom. The actual Declaration had not even been signed at that point. A few weeks later, the original document was signed, but hardly anyone in America ever saw it. It was not until 1818 that most Americans began to get a glimpse of what the Declaration actually looked like. That was the year the first facsimile was printed, by Benjamin Owen Tyler of Washington. He managed to create duplicates of the signatures that were virtually indistinguishable from the originals. Item 14 is a copy of that first facsimile. $25,000.

 

The greatest expedition in all of American history was undoubtedly that of Lewis and Clark, into the American Northwest, part of the Louisiana Purchase. The journey went from 1804-1806, though the official account was not published until 1814. Item 24 is a copy of the first edition of History of the Expedition Under the Command of Captains Lewis and Clark… This copy bears the bookplate of President James Garfield. It also contains an inscription from the man who gave it to him in 1872, Wilbur Fiske Sanders, who lived in Lewis and Clark country, Helena, Montana. Sanders had served under Garfield during the Civil War, and while neither was in high public office at the time, Sanders would go on to be a senator from Montana and Garfield President of the United States. $210,000.

 

What is the most famous speech ever given in American history? A likely choice would be the Gettysburg Address. Four score and seven years ago… Item 29 is the first authorized edition of this speech, but it bears the unexpected title of Address of the Hon. Edward Everett, at the Consecration of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg, 19th November 1863… Didn't Lincoln give the Gettysburg Address? Not really. Lincoln gave some "dedicatory remarks," which lasted a couple of minutes. The main, almost two hour long, but generally forgotten address was given by Senator Edward Everett of Massachusetts. Everett was perhaps the greatest orator of the day, and the featured speaker that morning, the President something of an afterthought. However, for that day at least, Lincoln's brief words outshone those of the great orator Everett, even if that wasn't recognized immediately.  $2,500.

 

The William Reese Company may be reached at 203-789-8081 or amorder@reeseco.com. Their website is www.reeseco.com.

Rare Book Monthly


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