• <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 10: Boone, Daniel. Autograph document signed. Est. $12,000-15,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 29: Darwin, Charles. Autograph letter signed. Est. $4,000-6,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 30: Davis, Jefferson. Civl War-date autograph letter signed. <BR>Est. $15,000-25,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 45: Einstein, Albert. Autograph letter signed. Est. $15,000-$25.000.
    <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 46: Einstein, Albert. A large archive.<br>Est. $25,000-35,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 48: Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed. Est. $15,000-25,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 57: Fulton, Robert. Autograph letter signed. Est. $8,000-12,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 74: Jackson, Thomas J. ("Stonewall"). <br>Est. $20,000-30,000.
    <b>Profiles in History Historical Auction 75, June 11th.</b>
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 97: Lincoln, Abraham. A Proclamation, January 1863. Est. $40,000-60,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 99: [Slavery - Thirteenth Amendment]. Est. $80,000-120,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 116: Newton, Sir Isaac. Autograph document signed ("Is. Newton"). <br>Est. $30,000-$50,000.
    <B>Profiles in History June 11.</B> Lot 200: Ruth Babe. Photograph signed. <br>Est. $4,000-6,000.
  • <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> Latest catalogue - The Russian Turmoil 1917-45: An Émigré perspective
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> S. Anichkova, Baroness Taube, [The Enigma of Lenin]. Prague, c. 1934.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> O. Kugusheva [Wolf Pack]. Berlin, 1940.
    <b>Shapero Rare Books:</b> B.M. Kuznetsov [To Please Stalin / 1945-1946]. Canada, 1968.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Iliazd, Picasso, Giacometti, etc. Poésie de mots inconnus. 1949. Bound by P.-L. Martin. Est: € 30,000-40,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Aristophane. Comoediae. 1608. Folio. Contemporary red morocco. De Thou’s copy. Est: € 6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Boccacio. Il Decamerone. 1757. Contemporary red morocco.<br>Est: € 4,000-6,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Hore beatissime virginis. Kerver, 1522. 44 woodcuts, 10 of each illuminated. Est: € 20,000-30,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June:</b> Molière. Œuvres 1666. Rare first collective edition. Bound by Chambolle-Duru. Est: € 12,000-18,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Borges. Cuaderno San Martín. First edition, with inscription and 2 autograph pieces. Est: € 6,000-8,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> De Gaulle. Signed autograph letter. 1939, 12 p., about the WWII and Hitler. Est: € 20,000-25,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Bonnard. Daphnis et Chloé. 1902. On China paper, with suite in blue.<br>Est: € 25,000-35,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b><br>Dali. La Divine Comédie. One of 21 copies on Japan paper, with suite. Est: € 10,000-15,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Miro & Hirtz. Il était une petit pie. 1928. One of 20 copies on Japan paper.<br>Est: € 15,000-20,000
    <b>Sotheby's Paris 25 June 2015:</b> Picasso & Level. Picasso. 1928. One of 120 first copies, with one lithograph on Japan paper.<br>Est: € 25,000-35,000
  • <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 52. Herman Melville. Autograph letter signed ,1858. est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 55.<br>Edgar Allan Poe. Oil on canvas portrait, est. $400-600
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 61. John Roberts. Account and Memoranda books of the Pennsylvania Quaker miller executed for treason during the American Revolution,<br>est. $6,000-8,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 106. Marc Chagall. <i>Le Plafond de l'Opera</i>, inscribed copy, est. $400-600
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 147. Manuscript Prayer Book in Latin and Dutch with Hand-colored woodcuts, c. 1500, est. $2,000-2,500
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 189. McKenney & Hall. <i>History of the Indian Tribes of North America</i>, 1837-38, est. $8,000-12,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 204. <br>Julio Plaza and Augusto do Campos. <i>Obetos Serigrafias Originais</i>, 1969,<br> est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 222. <i>Nuremberg Chronicle in</i> Latin, 1493, est. $25,000-35,000
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts Auction May 27-June 7</b>
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 234. <i>Third Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners of the Central Park</i>, 1860, est. $800-1,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 249. Theodor De Bry. Hand-colored illustrations of North American Indians, est. $2,000-2,500
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 254. <br>Pete Hawley. Original illustration<br>for Jantzenaire corsets, 1950s,<br>est. $2,000-3,000
    <b>Skinner May 27-June 7:</b> Lot 264. <i>Burr's Atlas of the State of New York</i>, 1840, est. $7,000-9,000

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - September - 2004 Issue

American Revolution Manuscripts<br>From Joseph Rubinfine

0906

Three letters from Revolutionary War soldier Charles Moile Talbot.


Item 49 offers some interesting correspondence from the British point of view from just before the outbreak of the Revolution. Thomas Hutchinson, Massachusetts Colonial Governor who had recently been replaced, writes from London to Harrison Gray, a colonial official in Massachusetts. Hutchinson is conciliatory, saying that England wants to resolve their differences with the colonists in a generous way, and expresses the hope "that they may terminate in peace, and restore us to the state we were in ten years ago..." Gray's response, a month later in February of 1775, is anything but conciliatory. Gray states that despite the colonists claim to still being loyal to the King, "they give no other evidence of their loyalty, than by disobeying his laws abusing his ministry insulting his representatives and condemning the authority of his Parliament." Gray concludes (not incorrectly) that they no longer want to be ruled by the King, and goes on to say that they will continue to do evil if England does not respond strongly and swiftly. "In that I tremble when I think of the destruction and misery which awaits this once happy and flourishing people (who enjoy more liberty and freedom than any nation under heaven), which nothing short of a due submission to the authority of the parliament of great Britain can avert..." Perhaps Gray overestimated England's power just a bit. Both Harrison and Gray would be named in the Massachusetts Banishment Act of 1778, an act which would forcibly remove them were they to be found in the state, and if they returned after being removed, executed the second time. $10,000.

Banishment wasn't the only punishment suffered by those who found themselves on the wrong side of the Revolution. Item 90 is a 1781 seizure of land owned by loyalist Charles Ward Apthorp by the Attorney General of Massachusetts. Apthorp was a large landowner who aligned himself with the losers and paid dearly for his mistake. $1,000.

While the officers and political leaders get most of our attention, there is nothing more poignant, and as realistic a portrait of war, than the letters of its soldiers. Literacy being what it was then, there aren't a lot of soldiers' letters floating around from the Revolutionary War. Here are three letters to his father from an enlisted man, Sergeant Charles Moile Talbot of Virginia. In the first he speaks of a sad journey to learn more about the death of his brother. His brother John did not die in battle. Rather, he had come down with some sickness, and in just five days had gone from "hearty" to vomiting, fever, and finally death. "My eyes Sheds Tears faster than my pen Sheds ink" the despondent Talbot writes. "Comfort yourselves as well as you [can] is my wish..."

In his second letter, Talbot states the time-honored refrain of "why don't you write me more often?" In his letter Talbot observes "the letter I Recevd of the 10th June Seemed as if it had Come from a part of the wourld where paper was Exceeding Scarce..." In pleading for more correspondence he points out what others may consider "no news" is "quite entertaining to me." In the third letter Talbot recounts his experiences at the battle of Germantown. A little research on the internet indicates that the soldier's father and recipient of the letter, also named Charles Talbot, was a man of reasonable means based on the will he left when he died two years later in 1779. I could not find any more on Charles the son other than he apparently died in 1797 at 40 years of age. These letters were reprinted in the William and Mary Quarterly in 1931. Item 105. $17,500.

Joseph Rubinfine is located in West Palm Beach, Florida, and may be reached by phone at 561-659-7077 or by email at Joerubinfine@mindspring.com.

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