• <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Normal Rockwell. Painting/Drawing Signed. Rockwell's "Barbeshop Quartet", 1936.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1782. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, Chicago, 1968). <i>Collection of papers of John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, concerning the convention</i>. Various places, 1968.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (ARMSTRONG, NEIL.) VERNE, JULES. <i>A Trip to the Moon.</i> New York: F. M. Lupton, September 9, 1893. Signed by Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on the moon.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> KEY, FRANCIS SCOTT. <i>A Celebrated Patriotic Song, the Star Spangled Banner.</i> 1814.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> [COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER, Amerigo Vespucci ..] Bernardus Albingaunensis .. Dialogo nuperrime edito Genue in 1512.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (WATKINS, TABER &c.). <i>An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West Various places</i>, c. 1890s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (BATTLE OF CONCORD.) <i>Powder horn used by Minuteman Oliver Buttrick at the Battle of Concord</i>, April 19, 1775.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (CIVIL WAR.) <i>An Extraordinary Confederate Photograph and Autograph Album of Dr. R. L. C. White</i>, 125 original mounted salt prints. 1859-61.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - June - 2010 Issue

Newspapers Continue Their Rapid Decent

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If you want read the rest of this Wall Street Journal article, you'll have to pay for a subscription.


By Michael Stillman

Circulation at America's newspapers took another huge hit during the last quarter of 2009 and the first quarter of 2010. According to figures released by the Audit Bureau of Circulations, the premier organization for tracking such things, average weekday sales at all newspapers declined 8.7% on a year-to-year basis, while Sunday readership declined by 6.5% Some tried to paint a happy face on this news by pointing out that this was actually less of a decline than last year, when weekday circulation tumbled 10.6%, Sunday circulation 7.5%. The difference hardly matters. This is a rate of decline barely better than freefall, and most newspapers are locked into a business model that is no longer sustainable. The fat lady is practicing her scales.

Of the top 25 U.S. newspapers, 24 experienced declines in circulation. Only the Wall Street Journal saw an increase, albeit very small (0.5%). More about its case later. The San Francisco Chronicle, on a death-watch for several years, was hammered the worst - weekday down 22.7%. However, many major names in the business also took hits nearly as bad. U.S.A. Today dropped 13.6%, the Washington Post 13.1%, the New York Times 8.5%. Weekday circulation at the Los Angeles Times dropped 14.7%, the Chicago Sun Times 13.9%.

Several newspapers attributed at least part of their declines to attempts to shore up their balance sheets. Several large papers instituted major increases in the newsstand price. However, it would appear that much of their gains were eaten up by circulation declines, and more importantly, advertising rates are based on circulation figures. Those, too, will have to fall. Short term relief will likely lead to even greater long-term stress.

One positive noted by many newspapers is that their websites have been seeing increased traffic. Indeed, it seems almost a foregone conclusion that newspapers will have to migrate to the web or die. They will not survive as print media, but perhaps may as electronic media. James Tyree, publisher and part of a team that recently bought Chicago's Sun Times (-13.9%) was recently quoted as saying newspapers still have 10 good years left. My guess is some may, but that there are plenty which will fold, at least as print media, long before then. One of these days, we will for the first time see some major city lose its last newspaper, and after that, to paraphrase King Louis XV, will come the deluge.

Tyree also stated that newspapers need to evolve into something else within, perhaps, five years, so as to be able to make the transition out of print. At this point, the only alternative that appears to be being actively pursued is websites. Naturally, there are no printing and delivery costs associated with online editions. However, there is no circulation revenue either. It also is not clear whether their online sites will provide the advertising effectiveness, or bring in the advertising revenue, of print editions. The potential reach of online editions is much greater, but potential is not a synonym for actual. Meanwhile, they may have to compete as equals against competitors from all over the world for national and international news, and other local sites, such as television station websites, for local news. The virtual monopoly on news that their circulation/delivery base gave them as print editions will disappear in the thin air of the web.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Announcing the Fall 2016 Auction Season
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b> 19th & 20th Century Literature
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Colored Plate Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Printed & Manuscript Americana
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Art, Press & Illustrated Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b> Illustration Art
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 3:</b> Old Master Through Modern Prints
  • <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WARREN, JOSEPH. Letter Signed ("Jos Warren") as Chairman of the Committee of Safety. Cambridge, MA, June 4, 1775.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WHITMAN, WALT. Leaves of Grass. Brooklyn, NY: [for the Author], 1855.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> JEFFERSON, THOMAS. Printed Broadside Signed ("Th: Jefferson") as Secretary of State. Philadelphia, February 12, 1793.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> CELLINI, BENVENUTO. 1500-1571. Autograph Letter Signed ("Beto. Cellini"). [Florence, c.1566].
    <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> NAPOLEON BONAPARTE. Autograph Manuscript. [c.1795].
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> DICKENS, CHARLES. Great Expectations. London: Chapman and Hall, 1861.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> REED, JOHN. To the Honourable House of Representatives of the Freemen of Pennsylvania this Map of the City and Liberties of Phiadelphia With the Catalog of Purchasers is Humbly Dedicated.... [Philadelphia]: engraved by James Smit
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> ELIOT, THOMAS STEARNS. The Waste Land. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1922.
    <b>Bonhams: Exploration and Travel. Sept. 20, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 20:</b> PTOLEMAEUS, CLAUDIUS. 2nd Century. Untitled Ptolemaic Map of the World. [Insculptum est per Johane Schnitzer de Armszheim.] [Ulm: Leinhart Holle, July 16, 1482.]
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 20:</b> HONDIUS, JODOCUS THE YOUNGER. 1597-1651; JOHANNES JANSSONIUS, PUBLISHER. 1588-1664; ADRIAAN METIUS, ASTRONOMER; & ABRAHAM GOOS, ENGRAVER. A Pair of Library Globes. Amsterdam: 1623, 1648.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 20:</b> HAKLUYT, RICHARD. 1553-1616. The Principall Navigations, Voiages, and Discoveries of the English Nations, made by Sea or ouer Land, to the most remote and farthest distant Quarters of the earth at any time within...
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 20:</b> WARRE, HENRY JAMES, SIR. 1819-1898. Sketches in North America and the Oregon Territory. [London]: Dickinson & Co., [1848].
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 20:</b> SPEKE, JOHN HANNING. 1827-1864. Manuscript map, ["Sketch Map of Eastern Africa, Shewing the Various Routes travelled by the Expedition"], 230 x 255 mm, n.p., c.1858.

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