• <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, Chicago, 1968). <i>Collection of papers of John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, concerning the convention</i>. Various places, 1968.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (ARMSTRONG, NEIL.) VERNE, JULES. <i>A Trip to the Moon.</i> New York: F. M. Lupton, September 9, 1893. Signed by Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on the moon.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> KEY, FRANCIS SCOTT. <i>A Celebrated Patriotic Song, the Star Spangled Banner.</i> 1814.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> [COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER, Amerigo Vespucci ..] Bernardus Albingaunensis .. Dialogo nuperrime edito Genue in 1512.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (WATKINS, TABER &c.). <i>An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West Various places</i>, c. 1890s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (BATTLE OF CONCORD.) <i>Powder horn used by Minuteman Oliver Buttrick at the Battle of Concord</i>, April 19, 1775.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (CIVIL WAR.) <i>An Extraordinary Confederate Photograph and Autograph Album of Dr. R. L. C. White</i>, 125 original mounted salt prints. 1859-61.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Announcing the Fall 2016 Auction Season
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b> 19th & 20th Century Literature
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Colored Plate Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Printed & Manuscript Americana
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Art, Press & Illustrated Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b> Illustration Art
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 3:</b> Old Master Through Modern Prints
  • <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WARREN, JOSEPH. Letter Signed ("Jos Warren") as Chairman of the Committee of Safety. Cambridge, MA, June 4, 1775.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WHITMAN, WALT. Leaves of Grass. Brooklyn, NY: [for the Author], 1855.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> JEFFERSON, THOMAS. Printed Broadside Signed ("Th: Jefferson") as Secretary of State. Philadelphia, February 12, 1793.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> CELLINI, BENVENUTO. 1500-1571. Autograph Letter Signed ("Beto. Cellini"). [Florence, c.1566].
    <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> NAPOLEON BONAPARTE. Autograph Manuscript. [c.1795].
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> DICKENS, CHARLES. Great Expectations. London: Chapman and Hall, 1861.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> REED, JOHN. To the Honourable House of Representatives of the Freemen of Pennsylvania this Map of the City and Liberties of Phiadelphia With the Catalog of Purchasers is Humbly Dedicated.... [Philadelphia]: engraved by James Smit
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> ELIOT, THOMAS STEARNS. The Waste Land. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1922.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - December - 2008 Issue

What Happened to the American Discount?

Currency

Collapsing US dollar from Exchange-Rates.org.


By Michael Stillman

These have been tough times for booksellers, American ones in particular. The advent of intense competition as a result of online listing sites and eBay has changed the face of bookselling over the past decade. Many traditional booksellers, particularly those with bricks and mortar stores, were forced to close their doors. As if this wasn't enough, the collapsing economy, first in America, but now spreading across the world, came at an already difficult time for the trade. Now, as the economy sinks deeper into recession, discretionary spending, a synonym for book buying, slides along with it.

However, through the difficult times of the past few years, there has been one bright side for the American bookseller. The collapsing US dollar has made books sold by Americans relatively cheap in Europe. Strong euros and British pounds enabled Europeans to buy books priced in dollars for a song, or at least, a comparative bargain. Many American booksellers took advantage of this situation to increase their overseas sales, even as domestic ones languished. Don't look now, but something has been happening the past few months that threatens this last refuge of prosperity for the American bookseller.

That once maligned dollar has suddenly gained surprising strength. It has enabled European and other overseas merchants to become more competitive in the U.S. It is part, though certainly not all of the reason that the price of oil, and with it gasoline, has collapsed so spectacularly over the past couple of months. Unfortunately, the flipside of cheaper foreign goods for Americans is more expensive American goods for foreigners. Those incredibly cheap rare and antiquarian books overseas collectors were buying from American sellers just got more expensive. Actually, they got a lot more expensive. The effective price of books sold by Americans to Europeans has been rising rapidly over the past few months, and yet the American booksellers don't get to see one penny of these increased costs. All they get are the decreased sales that come with increased prices.

Back in 2001, you could only buy $.85 worth of books for 1 euro. Three years ago, a euro still only bought $1.15 worth of American goods. It then began a steady climb, reaching $1.31 two years ago, $1.47 a year ago. By this past July, the value of the Euro had soared to $1.60. In effect, Europeans were getting a 30% discount versus three years ago, almost half off compared to 2001. Then the euro began to tumble compared to the dollar. In a mere four months it dropped from $1.60 to $1.25. To put it another way, Europeans saw the price of books offered by American sellers increase in price by 30% in four months, all because of an adjustment in exchange rates.

While the pattern of the British pound has differed from the euro, it too has suffered a stunning decline. A year ago, it peaked at a value of $2.10 per pound. As recently as July it was still over $2.00. Last month, it sank below $1.50. For the British buyer, that's an increase in cost of American books of 35% in four months.

There may be some consolation for the European bookseller here in that their wares are much less expensive for American collectors than they were this summer. However, one wonders how many American collectors can afford to take advantage of these discounts today.

In time this will all change. No one knows when, and it is likely good advice to hunker down for a while. This could be a long winter. The book trade could look quite different when spring returns, but return it will. Prosperity is just around the corner.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Normal Rockwell. Painting/Drawing Signed. Rockwell's "Barbeshop Quartet", 1936.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1782. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.

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