• <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Normal Rockwell. Painting/Drawing Signed. Rockwell's "Barbeshop Quartet", 1936.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1782. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, Chicago, 1968). <i>Collection of papers of John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, concerning the convention</i>. Various places, 1968.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (ARMSTRONG, NEIL.) VERNE, JULES. <i>A Trip to the Moon.</i> New York: F. M. Lupton, September 9, 1893. Signed by Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on the moon.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> KEY, FRANCIS SCOTT. <i>A Celebrated Patriotic Song, the Star Spangled Banner.</i> 1814.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> [COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER, Amerigo Vespucci ..] Bernardus Albingaunensis .. Dialogo nuperrime edito Genue in 1512.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (WATKINS, TABER &c.). <i>An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West Various places</i>, c. 1890s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (BATTLE OF CONCORD.) <i>Powder horn used by Minuteman Oliver Buttrick at the Battle of Concord</i>, April 19, 1775.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (CIVIL WAR.) <i>An Extraordinary Confederate Photograph and Autograph Album of Dr. R. L. C. White</i>, 125 original mounted salt prints. 1859-61.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - December - 2007 Issue

Microsoft's Book Search Reflects Pitched Battle With Google

Live

Microsoft's Live Search Books matches are easy to follow.


By Michael Stillman

There is a huge battle for internet dominance going on behind the scenes, and while this is not generally a subject for an antiquarian book site, it is showing up even in our field of play. In a strange reversal of roles, Microsoft is the upstart company, while Google is the dominant power. You may not have even noticed it, as Microsoft seems to be making a stealth attack (although Google surely hasn't missed it). Quietly, with surprisingly little fanfare, Microsoft has been building services similar to those offered by Google. Among them is the one appropriate to our field -- book search. A little under a year ago, Microsoft offered its version (still in beta) of an inside the book type of search -- Live Search Books. This is Microsoft's equivalent to Google Book Search. And if much of this seems ripped off from Google (could it be a Microsoft product if it were not copied from someone else?), it compares quite favorably to Google's offering. A few things are better, a few not as good, and much is similar.

Before we look specifically at the book searches, here is a quick note on what Microsoft has been up to in a most quiet way. Microsoft traditionally offered its search engine as part of its web portal, MSN.com. In other words, internet search was provided among a host of other features, especially the latest news. This is similar to the format built most successfully by Yahoo. Meanwhile, Google was rapidly becoming the leading internet search site through a page that featured search only, a stark page with a search box and not much else. Google's search-only format came to dominate internet search, leaving the internet portal search approach in the dust.

Microsoft has never been one to ignore another's successful formula, so it developed its own stark, search only site -- Live Search. If you go to www.live.com, you will find a search page that looks amazingly like -- surprise -- Google. Not only is the plain search box similar, but above it are an almost identical set of secondary links: "web," "images" "news," "maps" and "more." The only one missing from Google's list, naturally enough, is Gmail, for which Microsoft has substituted MSN. It may not be original, but it certainly is a proven formula. The issue for Microsoft is how do you pull users away from Google by offering essentially the same thing? The answer is not clear, especially since they are not doing much promotion. In the past, they have bundled their versions of software with their dominant computer operating system (Windows), but that got them into legal hot water. Perhaps they will again attempt a similar approach, or will try to reinvent the wheel in a superior model. One thing is clear -- they are not about to concede the internet to Google, no matter how large a lead the latter has built up.

Now it's time to look at Microsoft's Live Search Books. Just as to find Google's Book Search you go to the Google home page and click on "more," you go to the Live.com home page and click on "more." There you will find "Books." To compare Live with Google, I searched for "Richard Mentor Johnson," Martin Van Buren's vice-president. He is significant enough to appear in many books, but sufficiently obscure not to appear in too many. The initial results appear a massive victory, at least in terms of quantity, for Google: 617 matches vs. 61 for Microsoft. However, this reflects a different approach, along with a head start, for Google.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Announcing the Fall 2016 Auction Season
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b> 19th & 20th Century Literature
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Colored Plate Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Printed & Manuscript Americana
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Art, Press & Illustrated Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b> Illustration Art
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 3:</b> Old Master Through Modern Prints
  • <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WARREN, JOSEPH. Letter Signed ("Jos Warren") as Chairman of the Committee of Safety. Cambridge, MA, June 4, 1775.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WHITMAN, WALT. Leaves of Grass. Brooklyn, NY: [for the Author], 1855.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> JEFFERSON, THOMAS. Printed Broadside Signed ("Th: Jefferson") as Secretary of State. Philadelphia, February 12, 1793.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> CELLINI, BENVENUTO. 1500-1571. Autograph Letter Signed ("Beto. Cellini"). [Florence, c.1566].
    <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> NAPOLEON BONAPARTE. Autograph Manuscript. [c.1795].
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> DICKENS, CHARLES. Great Expectations. London: Chapman and Hall, 1861.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> REED, JOHN. To the Honourable House of Representatives of the Freemen of Pennsylvania this Map of the City and Liberties of Phiadelphia With the Catalog of Purchasers is Humbly Dedicated.... [Philadelphia]: engraved by James Smit
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> ELIOT, THOMAS STEARNS. The Waste Land. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1922.

Article Search

Archived Articles

Ask Questions