• Christie's: The first four Folios of William Shakespeare’s collected works will be auctioned on 25 May.
    Christie's: The first four Folios of William Shakespeare’s collected works will be auctioned on 25 May.
  • <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 1. Silver coin (1455), celebrating expulsion of English people in 1451.<br>Est: € 12,000-20,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 7. Heures à l’usage de Coutances. Paris, last quarter of 15th century. Est: € 30,000-40,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 9.<br>TERENCE. Lyon, Jean Trechsel, 1493. Est: € 20,000-30,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 8. Biblia latina. Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 1478. Est: € 20,000-30,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 11. [Francesco Colonna]. Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. Venise, Alde Manuce, December 1499. Est: € 150,000-200,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 14. Marco<br>Vigerio della Rovere. Decachordum christianum. Fano, Girolamo Socino, 1507. Est: € 15,000-20,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 18. CONSTANTIN VII. De notevoli et utilissimi ammæstramenti dell’agricoltura. Venise, Gabriele Giolito de Ferrari, 1542. Est: € 40,000-50,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 19. TITE-LIVE. Latinæ historiæ principis. Lyon, Sébastien Gryphe, 1548.<br>Est: € 15,000-20,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 38. OTTOMAN CORAN. 17th century by Muhammad Hafiz (Imam Mehmed Effendi).<br>Est: € 20,000-30,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 45. Blaise PASCAL. Pensées. Paris, Guillaume Desprez, 1670. Est: € 100,000-120,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 52. George EDWARDS. A Natural History of uncommon birds. London, the author, 1743-1751. Est: € 20,000-30,000
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 59. Jean de LA FONTAINE. Fables choisies. Paris, Desaint & Saillant, Durand, 1755-1759. Est: € 40,000-50,000.
  • <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 10.<br>Caxton (William, printer). Polycronicon, 53 leaves, after<br>July 1482. £10,000-£15,000
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 15. Cookery recipes. C17th/18th manuscript, 127pp., recipes include "To make Rasberry Creame" & "To make the Oxford Ginger Bread". £2,000-£3,000
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 32. Churchill (Winston S.) The Second World War, 2 vol. (of 6), signed and inscribed, 1950-51. £1,000-£1,500
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 34. "Lewis Carroll". The Nursery "Alice", with 7 autograph notes & letters, inscribed. 1891. £25,000-£35,000
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 39. Childers (Erskine) The Riddle of the Sands, first edition, in morocco binding, 1903. £700-£900.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 42. Ono (Yoko) and John Lennon. Grapefruit, signed by Lennon & Yoko Ono, 1971. £700-£900.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 58. Rodchenko (Alexander) Krasnaia Armiia [Red Army], 1938. <br>£1,800-£2,200.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 66. Henning (Veit Balthasar) Perpetual Almanac, 1750. £2,000-£3,000.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 73. Gillray (James) Dido in Despair, original hand-coloured caricature, 1802. £1,500-£2,000.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 94. Norris (Herbert) A good group of mostly Shakespearean and Elizabethan C20th costumes. £1,200-£1,800.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 106. Beardsley (Aubrey, illustrator) The Cambridge A.B.C., June 1894.<br>£1,000-£1,500.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 133. Perry (Charles) A View of the Levant, George IV's copy, the Beckford Rosebery copy, 1743. £5,000-£7,000.
  • <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 23/24.</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Mary Stuart. Ms. Parliament document (contemp. copy). 1567. <br>Est: € 2.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Latin and French Book of Hours. About 1480. Est: € 65.000.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Book of Hours by Germain Hardouyn. 1533. Est: € 18.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> G. P. Gallucci, Theatrum mundi. 1588. Est: € 5.000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 23/24.</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> J. Hill, The vegetable system. 1761-75. Est: € 60.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>J. Honter, Rudimentorum cosmographicorum libri III. 1549.<br>Est: € 3.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Two terrestrial and celestial globes by J. G. Doppelmayr. 1789 or later. Est: € 40.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>G. de Maupassant, Contes choisies. 1891-92. Est: € 6.000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 23/24.</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>K. Schwitters, HahnePeter. 1924.<br>Est: € 6.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>I. G. Chernikhov, Arkhitekturnye fantazii. 1933. Est: € 3.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>E. Baj, La Cravate. 1972. Est: € 3.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>H. Bellmer & G. Bataille, Histoire de l'oeil. 1944. Est: € 3.000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2007 Issue

<i>A Farewell to Alms</i> -- a book considered

Fta

A book worth reading


By Bruce McKinney

This is a brief economic history of the world with a focus on the Industrial Revolution. It is written by Dr. Gregory Clark. In it he offers a fresh perspective on recent economic developments that have intriguing implications for the world economy over the next one hundred years.

The difference between mathematics and economics is the difference between certainty and informed speculation. Mathematics looks at numbers and sees fixed if sometimes obscure relationships. Economics is the imposition of explicative theory on those things we do for money and reward. It's the difference between What are you paid and why do you work? Dr. Clark who teaches at the University of California at Davis, has written a thought-provoking book about Industrial Revolution, its causes and uneven spread around the planet. Using historical data available for England for the pre-industrial period [1200 to 1760] he creates a statistical baseline that, when compared to England from 1761 to the present, shows distinctive economic differences in the later period which he describes, as other economists have, as the first Industrial Revolution. In creating a clearer statistical picture of pre-industrial England he has created a unique pre-post comparison. He then interprets the causes for the Industrial Revolution through an examination of what changed. It is not an entirely certain process but original and highly worthwhile.

Modern economic theory credits institutions for creating the amalgam of factors that have enabled economic development. He credits the individual or more accurately, the sum of them, who acted from self-interest in an environment that was uniquely pliant to individual initiative. The development of the British Empire with a unifying language, sound laws, low taxes, minimal barriers to technology transfer, and relative peace were the apparent preconditions for the economic development achieved within the British Empire between 1860 and the eve of World War I. His book, A Farewell to Alms, by clarifying the past glimpses the future. And at 377 pages plus reference material, it's a rarity in economic theory, the easily understood book. No doubt, other economists will hold this against him.

He sees the world before the Industrial Revolution as stasis or as Dictionary.com defines it: the state of equilibrium or inactivity caused by opposing equal forces. He defines the modern era as beginning about 130,000 BC and being in stasis until 250 years ago. Then, in England, the Industrial Revolution began to take hold. It was, in his view, a thousand years in the making. His perspective is economic so the birth, death and revival of religions, the coming and going of dinosaurs, even the major shifts of humans as hunter-gathers to farmers are simply scenes observed from the window of trucks flying across Kansas on Route 40. They simply confirm his view of pre-industrial life as an equation:
P = F
where the number of people possible was equal to the amount of food available. When food was more plentiful population expanded. When the food supply diminished population fell. He allows that technology, perhaps more aptly labeled invention, increased food supply in some areas and mentions the production of rice in Japan and China as examples. But he believes that advances in food production, in the pre-Industrial Revolution period, always ultimately were reflected in increasing population that in time ate its way back to starvation and falling population. This is called the Malthusian Trap.

Rare Book Monthly

  • Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts, 8 June 2016, New York
    Bonhams June 8: ARISTOTLE.<br>384-322 B.C.E. De animalibus <br>US$ 300,000-500,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. Iconic signed Darwin photograph "I like this photograph much better than any other which ..."
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>Autograph Letter Signed</i>. Early Unpublished Darwin letter on the races of man.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> WRIGHT, WILBUR. Experiments and Observations in Soaring Flight. Journal of the Western Society of Engineers 8, no. 4 (August, 1903).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. Signed and dated Oxford 1931.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> GARDNER, ALEXANDER. Antietam Bridge, Maryland. "One of the memorable spots in the history of the war."

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