• <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 131. After Karl Bodmer (1809-1983) Pehriska-Ruhpa Aquatint. $1500-$2500
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 212. Catlin Snow Show Dance Hand Tinted Lithograph No. 14. $1000-$2000.
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 213: Hurlimann After Bodner Saukie Fox Indians Aquatint. $500-$1000.
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 226: After Karl Bodmer. Dance of the Mandan Indians Aquatint. $1000-$1500.
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 281: Karl Bodmer (1809-1983) Massika and Wakusasse Hand. $750-$1500.
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 244: After Catlin Nah-To-Toh Pa Lithograph, Plus Another. $300-$600.
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 305: History...Indian Tribes N. America, McKenney & Hall, 3. $3000-$5000.
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 316: Catlin, George, "North American Indians," 1841, 2 Vols. $500-$1000.
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 284: Catlin, George, "North American Indians," 1926, 2 Vols. $200-$300.
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 285: Coleson, Miss Ann, "Among the<br>Sioux Indians!" 1864. $500-$1000.
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 289: Heard, L.V.D., Sioux War and Massacres, 1865, First. $400-$800.
    <b>Dirk Soulis April 30:</b> Lot 288: Life of Life of Ma-Ka-Tai-Me-She-Kia-Kiak or Black Hawk, 1834. $400-$800.
  • Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts, 8 June 2016, New York
    Bonhams June 8: ARISTOTLE.<br>384-322 B.C.E. De animalibus <br>US$ 300,000-500,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5: Autographs</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Anne & Margot Frank's copy of <i>Grimm's Fairy Tales</i>, in which Anne wrote her own and Margot's name, circa 1940. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Albert Einstein, group of 4 letters Signed to Helmut L. Bradt regarding Bradt's emigration to the U.S., one bearing Nazi censor ink stamps, 1939-40. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Archive of items from Ludwig Bemelmans to producer Mary K. Frank, concerning <i>The Street <br>Where the Heart Lies</i>, 1959-62. <br>$10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5: Autographs</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Archive of correspondence to<br>Edwin A. Van Valkenburg from President Theodore Roosevelt and members of his family, 1913-21. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Oscar Wilde, manuscript notes panning a book on book collecting, circa 1886. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b><br>John Hancock, partly-printed document Signed as Governor of Massachusetts, Boston, 1781.<br>$4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5: Autographs</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Franz Liszt, Autograph Letter<br>Signed to Carl Gille, Rome, 1869. $4,00 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Joseph Conrad, photograph Signed and dated, 1918. $1,000 to $2,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b><br>Two Guns White Calf, photograph postcard Signed with his pictogram, 1929. $800 to $1,200.
  • Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 18. Blaeu, <i>Nova et Accuratissima Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula</i>, 1660.<br>Est. $14000-$17000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 20. Pitt, <i>Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula</i>, 1680. Est. $9500-$11000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 65. Ortelius, <i>Americae sive Novi Orbis, Nova Descriptio</i>, 1571. <br>Est. $6000-$7000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 84. Bailleul, <i>L'Amerique Divisee en Ses Principales Parties</i>, 1752.<br>Est. $19000-$22000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 99. Sayer & Bennett, <i>The American Military Pocket Atlas</i>, 1776. <br>Est. $10000-$12000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 269. Reid, <i>Plan of the City of Washington in the Territory of Columbia</i>, 1796. <br>Est. $2750-$3500
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 291. Carleton, <i>Map of Massachusetts Proper</i>, 1801. Est. $12000-$14000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 378. Keulen, <i>Pas Kaart vande Noord Oost Kust van Cuba en d'Oost Kust van Florida</i>, 1695. Est. $3250-$4000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 651. Ptolemy/Fries, <i>Tabula Superioris Indiae & Tartariae Maioris</i>, 1541.<br>Est. $3000-$4000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 688. Wit, <i>Nova Africa Descriptio</i>, 1660.<br>Est. $2750-$3500
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 706. Ortelius, <i>Maris Pacifici</i>, 1589.<br>Est. $8000-$9000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 727. Audubon, <i>Least Stormy-Petrel</i>, 1836. Est. $1400-$1700
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 741. Bordone, <i>Isolario</i>, 1547.<br>Est. $16000-$19000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 747. Teesdale, <i>A New General Atlas of the World</i>, 1835. Est. $2000-$2750
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 752. Colton, <i>Colton's Atlas of the World Volume I and II</i>, 1856.<br>Est. $2500-$3250
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 760. Prevost, <i>Histoire Generale des Voyages ... Tome Quatorzieme</i>, 1757. <br>Est. $2400-$3000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - September - 2005 Issue

Package Insurance: Managing Shipping Risk in the Bookselling Business

Uppic

Single item insurance rates from U-pic. Lower group rates available.


by Renee Magriel Roberts

I've never been overly fond of the insurance business. Insurance is an ethereal, intangible commodity that frequently appears more connected to a state of mind than a real product. The insurance transaction is essentially a two-part gamble: the insurance company is gambling that collectively it will reap profits despite the certainty that bad events happen; you are gambling that if something bad happens you will have paid less into the insurance "product" than the loss that occurs. I know from the crazy profits made by insurance companies that their bet is better than mine, and yet I buy insurance that is mandated (like car and house insurance), essential (like health insurance) and optional (like package insurance). Despite my admitted anti-insurance bias, I find package insurance extremely useful in our bookselling enterprise.

Now, not every bookseller insures her shipments. I've run into many who do not insure parcels at all; their shipping is at the customer's risk. Some engage in what I would call "poor man's insurance"; they feel that shipping with a proof of putting something in the post office mail stream covers them (for example, saving a receipt for postage, using Delivery Confirmation, or getting the post office to date-stamp a copy of the manifest) in the sense that they are no longer responsible for the shipment if the customer claims it is lost.

The problem with this methodology is that it puts the transit risk for the value of purchase entirely on the customer - a burden which the customer may in fact be shouldering unknowingly if he hasn't read the fine print. And, there is an added assumption that if a customer claims she hasn't received a package it is either somebody else's fault (e.g. the postal system, which will take no ultimate fiscal responsibility for uninsured merchandise) or the customer is simply being dishonest.

We know that this ultimately does not work if the customer has purchased through a site like Amazon, which will essentially force the bookseller to make good unless tracking is used, or through a credit card which will refund the customer and take the funds directly from your bank account. Moreover, fighting with the customer is a losing proposition. The ill-will created is generally a major negative in future sales.

The problem is only exacerbated by overseas shipping. Since you are dealing with at least two postal systems, packages are often delayed and may occasionally be lost. I feel like I should visit my local house of worship, for example, whenever we post something to Italy, a country whose employees not only frequently strike but have been known to burn piles of letters and packages to demonstrate their dissatisfaction. Since overseas shipping appears to be more risky than domestic shipping, and is certainly more expensive, sellers may be very uncomfortable providing services to overseas customers. Moreover, even if one wants to purchase insurance from the United States post office, this is not available for many types of shipments, and it is expensive.

Rare Book Monthly

  • Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 43: "The Gospel of Mary," Janus Press, 1995, Ltd Ed. Start price $700.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 24: E.B. White, "Charlotte's Web," London, 1952, First Edition Start price $ 6,000.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 9: Alan Turing, "The Word Problem in Semi-Groups," 1950, First Ed. Start price $1,300.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 14: Henry Chadwick, "The Game of Base Ball", NY, 1868, First Ed. Start Price $6,500.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 19: "The Writings of Henry David Thoreau," 1906, Limited Manuscript Edition. <br>Start Price $13,000.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 21: E.B. White & James Thurber, "Is Sex Necessary," 1929, First Ed. Start Price $1,700.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 27: Hooker, "The Rhododendrons of Sikkim-Himalaya," London, 1849-51.<br>Start Price $9,000.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 28: <br>"The Works of Charles Dickens," <br>60 Vols, 1881, Edition de Luxe.<br>Start Price $9,000.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 37: Murray, "Collection of Drawings by the Old Masters," 1904. Start Price $3,200.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 38:<br>Josef Albers, "Interaction of Color",<br>New Haven, 1963, First Edition.<br>Start Price $6,500.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 39: Robert Motherwell, "The Madrid Suite" (Set of 10), 1966. Start Price $11,000.
    Auctionata Apr 28. Lot 1: Signed<br>J. K. Rowling, "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix," 2003. $600.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. <i>A superb collection of manuscripts signed by Lincoln and relics related to Lincoln’s death</i>. Washington, 1864-1865
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Rare Relic of the Underground Railroad (1857). <i>$500 Reward Ran away ...</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> CARTER, SUSANNAH. <i>The Frugal Housewife,</i> (1772) the second American cookbook, plates by Paul Revere.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> SCHIRRA, WALTER M.. Icon of the American Space Program. <i>A Complete Set of Schirra’s Flight Log Books (1947-69).</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> A fine pair of daguerreotypes, one a black nurse holding a white baby, the other the white parents. Maryland, c. 1853.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Internet. (COMPUTERS.) CERF, VINTON & KAHN, ROBERT. <i>"A Protocol for Packet Network Intercommunication" in IEEE Transactions on Communications.</i>

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