• <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Feb 15:</b> Icons & Images: Photographs & Photobooks
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Mar 1:</b> Vintage Posters Featuring Highlights from the Gail Chisholm Collection
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Mar 8:</b> Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Mar 13:</b> 19th & 20th Century Prints & Drawings
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Mar 22:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Mar 29:</b> Printed & Manuscript African Americana
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Apr 12:</b> Printed & Manuscript Americana
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Apr 26:</b> Fine Illustrated Books & Graphics
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 3:</b> Graphic Design
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 15:</b> 19th & 20th Century Literature
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jun 7:</b><br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jun 21:</b> Revolutionary & Presidential Americana from the Collection of William Wheeler III
  • <b>Sotheby’s, New York: Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana, Including Cartography. January 17, 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> Hayden, Ferdinand V. <i>The Yellowstone National Park, and the Mountain Ranges of Portions of Idaho, Nevada, Colorado and Utah</i>. Boston, 1876. $250,000 to $350,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> Colton, G. Woolworth. <i>Colton’s New Map of the State of Texas, The Indian Territory and Adjoining Portions of New Mexico, Louisiana, and Arkansas</i>. New York, 1882. $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> [Jefferson, Thomas]. <i>The Committee appointed to prepare a Plan for the temporary Government of the Western Territory, have agreed to the following Resolutions.</i> … [Annapolis, 1 March 1784]. $250,000 to $350,000
    <b>Sotheby’s, New York: Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana, Including Cartography. January 17, 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> Mitchell, Samuel Augustus. <i>A New Map of Texas Oregon and California with the Regions Adjoining. Compiled from the Most Recent Authorities</i>. Philadelphia, 1846. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> Bodmer, Karl [illustrator] — Prince Maximilian Zu Wied-Neuwied. <i>Reise In Das Innere Nord-America In Den Jahren 1832 Bis 1834</i>. 1839-1841. $250,000 to $350,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> Bry, Theodor De, Thomas Hariot, and John White. <i>[Hariot's Virginia]. Wunderbarliche, Doch Warhafftige Erklärung, Von der Gelegenheit und Sitten der Wilden in Virginia</i>... Frankfurt, 1590. $200,000 to $300,000
    <b>Sotheby’s, New York: Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana, Including Cartography. January 17, 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> Bry, Theodor De, Thomas Hariot, and John White. <i>[Hariot's Virginia]. Wunderbarliche, Doch Warhafftige Erklärung, Von der Gelegenheit und Sitten der Wilden in Virginia</i>... Frankfurt, 1590. $200,000 to $300,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> Catlin, George. Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio. Hunting Scenes and Amusements of the Rocky Mountains and Prairies of America. London, 1844. $70,000 to $100,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> Franklin, Benjamin ["Richard Saunders"]. <i>Poor Richard Improved: Being an Almanack and Ephemeris ... For ... 1756</i>. Philadelphia: B. Franklin And D. Hall, 1755. $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Sotheby’s, New York: Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana, Including Cartography. January 17, 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> Paine, Thomas. <i>Common Sense; Addressed to the Inhabitants Of America... A New Edition, with Several Additions in the Body of the Work</i> ... Philadelphia, [1776]. $60,000 to $80,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> The Declaration of Independence. In Congress, July 4, 1776 … Salem, Massachusetts-Bay: Printed By E. Russell, By Order Of Authority, [Ca. 18–20 July 1776]. $1,000,000 to $1,500,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Jan. 17:</b> Hamilton, Alexander, James Madison, and John Jay. The Federalist. A Collection of Essays, Written in Favour of the New Constitution … New York, 1788. $200,000 to $300,000
  • <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> A Rare 3-rotor German Enigma I Enciphering Machine. $70,000 to $90,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Important collection of correspondence between Werner Heisenberg and Bruno Rossi. $40,000 to $60,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Walt Whitman Autograph manuscript containing his thoughts on death. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> David Roberts. <i>Holy Land</i>. Six volumes. 1842-1849. First edition. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Extensive collection of Ray Bradbury's primary works, most signed or inscribed. $15,000 to $20,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Peter Force. Declaration of Independence. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Steinbeck. <i>Grapes of Wrath</i>. A fine copy of the first edition. $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Lewis & Clark. <i>Travels to the Source of the Missouri River</i>... First English edition, extra-illustrated. 1814. $10,000 to 15,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Manuscript document signed by Nuno de Guzman relating to Hernan Cortes, 1528. $8,000 to $12,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> “Nos los inquisidores..." The first book in English printed West of the Mississippi. [1787]. $5,000 to $8,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - November - 2017 Issue

The Memoirs of the Sansons, A French History of Violence

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A day at the office for the Sansons.

Sanson is a creepy name in the history of France, borne by a notorious dynasty of executioners. They operated in Paris from 1688 to 1847. So many broken bones, severed heads and spilled blood deserved a book, no doubt. But not the apocryphal memoirs that came out in 1830! Putting the record straight, the true descendant of the Sansons, Henri-Clément (1799-1889), gave his own version of the story in 1862. His book opens with a breath-taking preface that relates the evolution of the means of execution along the centuries. Needless to go any further to shiver with fear and disgust. The memoirs of the Sansons? A French history of violence.

 

 

Apocryphal edition

 

The Mémoires des Sanson (Memoirs of the Sansons) came out in 1830, in Paris. As soon as 1852, Quérard identified them as a “literary deception” in his Supercheries littéraires dévoilées. In fact, they were apocryphal. The bookseller Sautelet had commended them to a group of writers—including the famous Honoré de Balzac and Louis-François L’Héritier—before unscrupulously selling them as authentic. This was an enticing project that capitalized on the taste of the public for blood, and clearly focused on the Sansons’ most notorious deeds, the (exciting) beheadings of numerous French Nobles during the Revolution—including Louis XVI, in 1793. Though based on actual facts, these memoirs are full of made-up details. Furthermore, their general tone is one of hateful opposition to the Bourbons (kings of France—writer’s note) and the Clergy,” deplores Henri-Clément in his own memoirs of the Sansons (Paris, 1862), entitled Seven Generations of Executioners: the Memoirs of the Sansons. His preface starts with his receiving his revocation from the French government in 1847. That was, he claims, the happiest day of his life. At last, the family curse was lifted! No more should the Sansons live under the heavy load of their vile “charge”. Indeed, the position of executioner depended on a “charge”, or official appointment, passed from father to son. Well—in fact, Sanson lost his position because of his own vices; some of them he shared with a few of his victims.

 

More than one way to skin a cat

 

If nothing else, the very serious preface of Henri-Clément’s work makes it worth reading: “I’ll try to show—what a horrible confession!—how far the imagination of man can reach when barbarity and cruelty are concerned.” The death penalty was not abolished in France until 1981, but the Revolution of 1789 brought more humanity to the process—the guillotine then replaced all torments. Prior to that, man had been very creative when it came to murdering man.

The cross:the most ancient torment, and also the most cruel one,” states Sanson. The victim was tied to a cross, which could take the shape of a T, a Y or a X—depending on the executioner’s creativity. This was nothing new, as Jesus Christ could testify. In the 18th century it was used in a different form as the victim was tied to “a cross of St Andrew” before being broken alive by the executioner—some gaps were left under the legs and arms so that they would break more easily.

Beheading: also very fashionable, especially in the time of Cardinal de Richelieu—the 17th century—, when he forced the Nobles to abide by his rules. Indeed, this torment was a privilege granted to people of quality only. But as “it relied on the ability of the executioner, which was unfortunately depending upon practice, history recalls many failures. Everyone knows that Thou received 11 blows before his head fell off.”

Hanging: for men of no importance. Yet, some Nobles suffered it as well, including the notorious Coligny, who illustrated himself during the religious wars of the 16th century. “His corpse was already rotten when Charles IX went to visit him at the gallows. This young monarch, inspired by the words of a Roman Emperor, durst say to those who stood aside: “Learn that the corpse of an enemy always smells good.

Burning people alive: another option; used “less to punish the culprits than to terrorize the public,” says Sanson. “First, they planted a post into the ground—roughly eight feet tall. Then they left a void all around, and built a stake made of logs, straw and bundles of sticks. The victim was then attached to the main post and the stake set afire. Usually, the victim was spared with the pains of the flames, as a system of hooks enabled the executioner to pierce his or her heart as soon as the execution began.” They were humans, after all.

Skinning people alive was also a French custom, as well as the most feared torment of impaling. Sanson gives us some valuable details about the latter: “Once the patient lying on the belly, with his hands tied in the back, a man sits upon him to prevent any movement; another one, holding his neck, pushes a pale in his behind—it is then pushed further inside with a hammer. When the pale is set upright, the weight of the body makes it progress through it until it comes out again under the armpit or through the chest.”

Quartering: exclusively reserved to those who had committed a crime of lese-Majesty. Thank God, these people were few—as a matter of fact, when Gabriel Sanson was ordered to quarter Damiens (a mad man who had tried to murder Louis XV) in 1757, he had no clue about how to proceed! And no one else had. Indeed, the last quartering dated form 1610—it was applied to Ravaillac, the murderer of Henri IV. Our executioner grew so anxious that “he fell sick, and stayed in bed for a few days.” But there was no way he could have escaped his duty. A torment hardly ever came alone, but with a series of minor ones—quartering, for instance, came with “tenaillement”; which consisted in tearing some pieces of flesh from someone’s legs and arms with pincers. To make things livelier—or to spare the victim’s life until the final act—, some boiling oil or wax was poured into the fresh wounds. When Damiens endured this part, he became “drunk with pain!”, and “his voice was hardly yet human when, joining the crispy sound of the roasting flesh, he shouted: “More! Give me more!” Quartering itself meant tying the legs and arms of the victim to four separate horses, and to pull them apart by using the strength of the animals. During Damiens’ ordeal, the horses pulled so hard that one of them fell on the ground. Yet, “the human machine resisted this horrible treatment.” The executioners started it over—and over. “It was noticed that Damiens’ legs and arms had now an unusual length; but he was still alive.” This was more than even the witnesses could bear. “The executioners were abased, the priest from Saint-Paul, M. Guéret, had fainted; the clerk was hiding his face in his hands, and a murmur of discontent was dangerously running among the public.” Eventually, Damiens’ arms and legs were partly cut with a sword, and the quartering resumed—“a leg came off, then the second one, then an arm. Damiens was still breathing.” He died a few minutes later, and then his remains were thrown into the fire—phew!

 

Queen Guillotine

 

On January 21, 1790, all torments were abandoned in exclusive favour of the guillotine—Louis XVI had abolished torture in 1780. Contrary to what many people think, the guillotine was not the daughter of sadism. Indeed, the Revolutionary Assembly adopted it as a humane and quick way to put an end to someone’s life. “It was a most dignified torment,” states Sanson. “It hit a man in his noblest and most powerful organ, the presumed seat of intelligence. Yesterday a privilege, beheading became, thanks to the concept of equality before the law, common to all.” Indeed, before the Assembly adopted it, the means of execution depended on the “quality” of the victims—beheading was for the Nobles, while the others were hanged, for example. If all men were created equal, then all men had to be killed the same. Dr. Guillotin did not invent the guillotine either; he simply perfected an Italian machine from the 16th century known as the mannaia. Only a few old engravings remained of it at the time, and he had trouble figuring out how to make it work. According to the memoirs of Clément-Henri Sanson, his ancestor Charles-Henri Sanson was playing music with a German friend of his, one mechanist named Schmidt, when the latter suddenly drew the sketch of a death machine on a sheet of paper: “THAT WAS THE GUILLOTINE!” These people knew how to entertain themselves.

 

Sanson and Dr. Guillotin then presented the project to Dr Louis, the personal doctor of King Louis XVI. During the interview, a newcomer appeared out of the blue and allegedly told them how to improve the shape of the blade. “The first impression of Sanson had been the right one: the King was standing in front of him.” Thus Louis XVI contributed to the death machine that severed his head a few years later! On that fateful day, Charles-Henri Sanson was waiting for him on the scaffold. According to a popular belief, Louis XVI’s last words were for La Pérouse, the famous navigator who had disappeared at sea: “Is there any news on La Pérouse?” A keen cartographer, Louis XVI had drawn the trajectory of the expedition himself. But this is an apocryphal statement. “French people,” he said, “your King is about to die for you. May my blood seal your happiness. I die an innocent man.” He was about to add something but the drums cut in. “Son of Saint Louis,” whispered the priest, as the blade of the guillotine was falling, “go up to heaven!” Up he went; and down his head—“the operation is so quickly executed that only the sound of the blade testifies of the death of the victim, and of the fact that justice is done. The head falls into a basket full of bran placed below; meanwhile, to hide the sight of the blood flowing from the cut, a circular black leather blinder is drawn.” It is wise to turn a blind eye on certain things.

 

The “charge” of executioner was a dull one. But do not trust Henri-Clément Sanson, he wasn’t relieved when dismissed in 1847. His family had always fought hard to keep this “charge”. In 1726, Charles Sanson died, survived by one son, Charles-Jean-Baptiste. His mother made sure the child would inherit the “charge” of his father—the Parliament complied, but appointed an assistant executioner, due to the young age of Charles-Jean-Baptiste. Yet the kid was to assist in every session of torture and execution perpetrated in his name—he was only seven!

 

Anyway, Henri-Clément was not dismissed by chance. First of all, though married and the father of two, he was a “wild pederast”, as a police report of the time states: “He lives with a young man, one Hubert alias Little John, who is his assistant.” It didn’t stop him from executing several men convicted for buggery, showing nothing but disgust for their “vile passion”—at least openly. Henri-Clément was also a gambler—who lost a lot, and borrowed as much. One day, his upset creditors complained, and the executioner of Paris became a wanted man! “But he was a cunning fox,” reads an article published in Le Point in 2012. “He knew that the police of the time couldn’t arrest people but inside the walls of Paris, and from 6 A.M. to 6 P.M. exclusively. Thus, every morning at dawn, Sanson carefully left the brothels and the gambling houses of the capital and returned to his place in the suburbs.” But in 1846, he received the order to execute one Pierre Lecomte and was consequently forced to enter the capital in broad daylight. He was arrested shortly after the execution, while storing the guillotine—the executioner was responsible for his work tool, which he owned. Sent to jail, he offered his main creditor to leave the guillotine with him as security until full payment of the debt. The deal was concluded but Sanson failed to pay on due time. Called for another execution in March 1847, he ran to his creditor, who refused to give the guillotine back. Sanson had no choice but to inform the Ministry of justice. The debt was paid so the execution could take place on time, and Henri-Clément Sanson was soon dismissed. Thus retired the last offspring of seven generations of executioners! Death had lost a faithful servant, but don’t you worry, she was never short of volunteers: “The day following my dismissal,” Sanson writes, “eighteen pretenders were already fighting over my bloody succession.” Unlike God, Death has never rested a single day.

 

Thibault Ehrengardt

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. January 27, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 39: Presidential Pardon Signed by John F. Kennedy. November 1962. $7,000 to $9,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 537: Marc Chagall. <i>Illustrations for the Bible</i>. Features 28 lithograph plates. First American edition, 1956. $2,000 to $3,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 252: Jack Kerouac. <i>On the Road</i>. 1957. First edition. $5,000 to $7,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. January 27, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 143: Arthur Rimbaud. <i>A Season in Hell</i>. With photogravures by Robert Mapplethorpe. The Limited Editions Club, 1986. $600 to $800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 72: Group of 11 Harry Truman Signed Letters. Typed & signed by the former President. 1962-1970. $1,500 to $2,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 157: Arthur Conan Doyle. The Complete Works of Sherlock Holmes by The Limited Editions Club. 8 vols. 1950-52. $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. January 27, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 173: Jacob Lawrence. <i>The First Book of Moses, Called Genesis</i>. Illustrated with silkscreens by Lawrence. 1989. $2,000 to $3,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 239: William Faulkner. <i>Sartoris</i>. First edition. New York: Harcourt, Brace, & Company, 1929. $2,000 to $3,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 286: Walt Whitman. New Year’s Eve Postcard Signed, “Walt Whitman,” to the poet Gabriel Sarrazin. January, 1891. $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. January 27, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 351: Pair of European Fine Bindings. Including Gesanbuch (1831) & Naboznych Vylevov (1911). $200 to $300
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 423: August Luben. <i> Naturhistorischer Atlas der Saugethiere </i>. Includes complete set of 30 loose plates. Leipzig: 1858. $1,000 to $1,500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions Jan. 27:</b><br>Lot 386: <i>Famous Monsters of Filmland No 1</i>. Art by Will Elder, text by Forrest Ackerman. Warren’s first monster magazine. Feb, 1958. $2,000 to $3,000
  • <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. January 25, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> <i>Verve: Revue Artistique et Littéraire/An Artistic and Literary Quarterly,</i> nos.1-38 in 26 vol [a complete set], numerous colour lithographs by Picasso, Chagall, Matisse & others. £8,000 to £12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Wesley (John, Church of England clergyman and a founder of Methodism, 1703-91). Autograph Letter signed to Rev. John Bredin, 1782. £8,000 to £12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Austen (Jane). Brock (Charles Edward). A group of seventeen ink and watercolour drawings for Dent's edition of Jane Austen's <i>Sense and Sensibility,</i> 1908. £6,000 to £8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. January 25, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Tibullus (Albius) and Gaius Valerius Catullus. <i>Elegiae, sive Carmina,</i> Venice, Andreas de Paltasichis, 1487. £5,000 to £7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Doves Press. English Bible (The), 5 vol., one of 500 copies, signed and inscribed by Laurence Hodson, Doves Press, 1903. £5,000 to £7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Africa. Smith (Andrew). <i>Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa,</i> 5 vol., first edition, original cloth, [1838-50]. £4,000 to £6,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. January 25, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Longitude. <i>An Act for providing a Publick Reward for such Person or Persons as shall Discover the Longitude at Sea,</i> first edition of this highly important act, John Baskett, 1714. £3,000 to £5,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Shirley (James). <i>Six new playes, viz. The Brothers. Sisters. Doubtfull Heir. Imposture. Cardinall. Court secret,</i> first edition, 1653. £3,000 to £4,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Heaney (Seamus). <i>Ugolino,</i> number 77 of 125 copies, Dublin, Dolmen Press, 1979. £3,000 to £4,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. January 25, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Lasinio (Carlo, 1759-1838). <i>[Ritratti Originali de Pittori Esistenti Nella Reale Galleria de Firenze],</i> 99 engravings, circa 1791-96. £1,800 to £2,200
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Japan. Kusakabe Kimbei. Photograph Album, 50 hand-coloured albumen prints, oblong folio, [c.1890-1900]. £1,500 to £2,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Jan. 25:</b> Polar. Expedition in search of Sir John Franklin. Arctic Expedition in search of Sir John Franklin, printed flyer, 1852. £1,000 to £1,500
  • <b>Case Antiques: Historic Winter Fine Art and Antiques Auction<br>January 27, 2018</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> <i>The Massachusetts Magazine: or Monthly Museum of Knowledge and Rational Entertainment,</i> 1789. Signed by George Washington. $28,000 to $32,000
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> George Washington Signed Letter to John Marshall. $12,000 to $14,000
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> Picasso Signed “Vallauris” 1952 Exhibition Poster. $6,000 to $8,000
    <b>Case Antiques: Historic Winter Fine Art and Antiques Auction<br>January 27, 2018</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> Military appointment commission document signed by both President Thomas Jefferson and Secretary of War Henry Dearborn, dated January 27, 1803. $2,400 to $2,800
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> Doris Ulmann and Julia Peterkin. <i>Roll, Jordan, Roll.</i> New York, 1933, deluxe edition, preceding first edition of the same year. No. 74 of 350. $5,000 to $6,000
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> John Marshall. <i>The Life of George Washington,</i> Philadelphia, 1832. Signed by author. $5,000 to $7,000
    <b>Case Antiques: Historic Winter Fine Art and Antiques Auction<br>January 27, 2018</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> Samuel L. Margolies (American, 1897-1974). Aquatint and etching, "Builders of Babylon," 1937. $4,000 to $4,500
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> Two Robert E. Lee (1807-1870) signed documents as President of Washington College. $3,000 to $3,500
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> William C. Harris. <i>The Fishes of North America That Are Captured on Hook and Line</i>, Vol I., New York, 1898. 40 chromolithograph plates. $2,000 to $2,500
    <b>Case Antiques: Historic Winter Fine Art and Antiques Auction<br>January 27, 2018</b>
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> $100 "Date Back" bank note 1902 from the Clarksville National Bank, Clarksville, Tennessee, depicting the portrait of John Jay Knox, Jr. $1,400 to $1,800
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> View of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville and Monticello, Taken from Lewis Mountain, drawn and lithographed by Edward Sachse. $800 to $1,000
    <b>Case Antiques, Jan. 27:</b> Large Civil War photograph mounted on card stock depicting Rossville Gap in Missionary Ridge. $400 to $450

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