• <b>Skinner: Early English Books<br>A Single Owner Sale. July 20, 2018</b>
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Cranmer, Thomas (1489-1556). <i>Catechismus, That is to Say, a Shorte Instruction into Christian Religion...</i> London, 1548. First edition. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Donne, John (1572-1631). <i>Pseudo-Martyr.</i> London: Printed by W[illiam] Stansby for Walter Burre, 1610. First edition. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Fletcher, Giles (1549?-1611). <i>The Russe Common Wealth, or Maner of Gouernement by the Russe Emperour…</i> London, 1591. First edition. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Gabelkover, Oswald (1539-1616). <i>The Boock of Physicke.</i> Dordrecht: Isaack Caen, 1599. First edition. $12,000 to $15,000
    <b>Skinner: Early English Books<br>A Single Owner Sale. July 20, 2018</b>
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Galileo, Galilei (1564-1642) trans. Thomas Salusbury (d. 1666). <i>Mathematical Collections and Translations the First Tome.</i> London, 1661. First edition of Galileo's works in English. $35,000 to $50,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Higden, Ranulphus (d. 1364). <i>Polycronicon.</i> Translated by John Trevisa, with the 1357-1460 <i>Continuation</i> by William Caxton. Southwark, 1527. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Randolph, Bernard (b. 1643). <i>The Present State of the Morea, Called Anciently Peloponnesus…</i> London, 1689. [Bound with] <i>The Present State of the Islands of the Archipelago…</i> $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> <i>The Great Herball Newly Corrected.</i> London, 1539. Folio, ESTC lists three U.S. copies; the last copy offered at auction was incomplete and sold in 1949. $25,000 to $35,000
  • <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>The Tragedie of Julius Caesar.</i> London, 1623. 1st appearance in print, Complete from the First Folio. Sold for $175,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Ernst, Max. <i>Mr. Knife and Miss Fork</i>. Paris, 1932. DELUXE EDITION. Sold for $15,625
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Cage, John. Autograph musical leaf from his Concert for Piano and Orchestra, NY, 1958. Sold for $18,750
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Einstein, Albert. Signed Passport Photo for his US citizenship application. Bermuda, 1935. Sold for $17,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Verard, Antoine. Illuminated printed Book of Hours. Paris, 1507. Sold for $7,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Wetterkurzschlussel. German Weather Report Codebook - for Enigma use. Berlin, 1942. Sold for $225,000
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Morelos y Pavon, Jose Maria. Autograph letter signed to El Virrey Venegas, February 5, 1812. Sold for $6,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Milne, A.A. Complete set of <i>Winnie-the-Pooh</i> books. 4 volumes. All first issue points. London, 1924-1928. Sold for $5,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> A 48-star American Flag, battle worn flown at Guadalcanal and Peleliu, 1942-1944. Sold for $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Locke, John. Autograph Letter Signed mourning the death of his friend, William Molyneaux, 2 pp, October 27, 1698. Sold for $20,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Luis de Lucena, <i>Arte de Ajedres,</i> first edition of the earliest extant manual on modern chess, Salamanca, circa 1496-97. Sold for $68,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Carte-de-visite album with 83 images of prominent African Americans & abolitionists, circa 1860s. Sold for $47,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> Vienna & Leipzig, 1918. Sold for $106,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Man Ray, <i>[London Transport] – Keeps London Going,</i> 1938. Sold for $149,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Thomas Jefferson, Letter Signed, to Major-General Nathanael Greene, promising reinforcements against Cornwallis, 1781. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Nicolas de Fer, <i>L’Amerique Divisee Selon Letendue de ses Principales Parties,</i> Paris, 1713. Sold for $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Russell H. Tandy, <i>The Secret in the Old Attic,</i> watercolor, pencil & ink, 1944. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ernest Hemingway, <i>Three Stories & Ten Poems,</i> first edition of the author's first book, Paris, 1923. Sold for $23,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Walker Evans, <i>River Rouge Plant,</i> silver print, 1947. Sold for $57,500.
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2017 Issue

Nancy Pearl & the Pursuit of Bookish Things

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Nancy Pearl, 72, bookseller, librarian, reviewer and model for the Nancy Pearl Librarian Action Figure has just published her first novel: George & Lizzie.

There’s not much in the world of bookish pursuits that Nancy Pearl hasn’t tried. She’s been a Tulsa bookseller, a Seattle librarian, a highly regarded book reviewer with regular guest appearances on NPR, the author of four volumes in the Book Lust series of recommended reading. She also interviews authors on television and is possibly the only librarian to have her own collectible action figure - a little plastic doll that makes a “Shushing motion…..” 

 

This September, at age 72, she added another string to the bow with the publication of her debut novel George & Lizzie ($25, Touchstone-Simon & Schuster).

 

When I first met Nancy Pearl she was still Nancy Linn, a student at Cass Tech High School in Detroit. My brother was her classmate; he brought her to our house where she was soon recruited by my mother to work in the book mines at the Cellar Book Shop (the Motor City’s only upstairs ABAA shop specializing in the Philippines and Southeast Asia), a job she did well and held for many years.

 

We all knew Nancy was destined for bigger things. Now, more than 50 years later, it’s a pleasure to look back on her career and see where she thinks the written word is headed. In her opinion, “The global rise of the Internet changed everything, not only books and the book business, it truly changed the way we live. I’m not a Luddite," she said, "I love what technology can do, and I have 13,000 followers on Twitter." Though she loves what it can do in libraries, she fears the end result of all that new technology is a certain shallowness, superficiality and isolating effect.

 

To be candid she’s worried about the future of libraries and reading: “When the Internet tsunami first hit, libraries didn’t know how to deal with it. The reaction was primarily consternation and the discussion was what role we would have now that the Internet could answer any ‘ready reference’ questions."

 

"Would it be the role of librarians to point out which are reliable sites? Turns out nobody knew and in the fullness of time nobody cares. The amazing and fascinating world of technology took over the libraries and crowded out the other services.”

 

She sees libraries as the heart of the community. "There are other ways to access computers and other venues for programs and discussions. Only the library provides both information and enrichment. But,” she said, "that is not seen as a primary function any longer.”



A longtime library professional she is a 1967 graduate of the University of Michigan with a degree in Library Science. She received her MA in history from Oklahoma State University in 1977. She lived 22 years in Oklahoma, fifteen of those in Tulsa.

 

In the beginning she worked at Yorktown Alley Bookstore in Tulsa, which was an independent shop selling new books. "As the lead bookseller it gave me an opportunity to talk with and sell books to many people." Though the store has since closed she termed it “a pretty great experience."

 

From there she went went back to library work in the Tulsa City-County system. Her career as a reviewer began at the Tulsa World, a daily paper and expanded when Tulsa public radio station KWGS requested her to come on and talk about books, which she did with enthusiasm from 1989 to 1993

 

Moving to the state of  Washington Pearl worked as director of the Washington Center for the Book at Seattle Public Library from 1993 to 2004. Her radio career continued when the program director in Tulsa sent a tape to the program director at Seattle’s KUOW public radio, urging the station “to have her on live …. she has no fear….”

 

"All I can say," said Nancy, "is it sold a lot books.”

 

She’s does not recall exactly how she made the transition from the Seattle airwaves to NPR’s Morning Edition, where she chats with host Steve Inskeep on a regular basis. In her ongoing role as a radio reviewer of current writing and TV interviewer of living authors she estimates she read thousands of books.

 

As for money, well money is not a big part of the Nancy Pearl equation. For example, she recalled, “When I left the bookstore in Tulsa to work for the library, it paid less than the bookstore." Presently she is semi-retired, though she continues to review, interview, host workshops and most recently write a novel.

 

Nancy Pearl - writer of fiction was not a premeditated action.

 

"A few years ago," she said, "two characters appeared in my head. I knew their names and where they met, but nothing else. In the next five years they stuck with me and I gradually came to know them. I wrote it in my head first."

 

"It was not on my list to write a novel. One day when I couldn’t find just the right book, I thought, 'Well, I could write it down, and it would be exactly the kind of book I'd want to read.'”

 

The checklist for "exactly the kind of book I'd like to read" includes quirky characters and healthy doses of book references, poetry, football and prickly people. Working with editor Tara Parsons it took two years to get it from her head to down on paper.

 

The story, set largely in Ann Arbor, is told through the eyes of a young Jewish woman in her 30s. But, Nancy said, "None of it is autobiographical, it’s all fiction." Her writing style is not straightforward, there’s much back and forth, many back stories and minor characters, "but that is my voice, the older and wiser, narrator, that's me,” she said. “I even got to record an audio book."

 

On the market for less than a month, most of the reviews are positive. Her publisher is pleased, she herself characterizes it as "not an excessively commercial book."

 

Though she's met many authors on book tours, she found her own promo schedule “exhausting - really exhausting.” Her September events included stops and talks in Oregon, California, Wisconsin, up and down the East Coast and of course, a visit to Tulsa.

 

"Right now I’m just catching up on my sleep. It was wonderful: wonderful libraries, bookstores, great people. I pride myself on the ability to rise to the occasion, but I must say right now I’m pretty tired." From October 3 to November 17 she goes back on the road promoting George & Lizzie with stops in Michigan, Virginia, Ohio and Washington.

 

As for another book? “I’m not so sure. I want to enjoy this. There will be a paperback edition next year. I like hearing from readers. I love talking about books and sharing."

 

Commenting on the 'Nancy Pearl - Librarian Action Figure' she noted that “it’s been discontinued, but rumor is there may be a new and different one, equally fabulous, plastic and 5” tall."

 

There’s no more shushing, this one is fighting against censorship.”

 

Though she is presently recovering from the rigors of travel, she has no intentions of scaling back. "Over the years I've traveled abroad talking to kids in other countries about books and reading. It’s arranged through the U.S. embassies, I go myself in person. I’ve been to Estonia, Bosnia, Vietnam, Cambodia -- I’d love to do more of that."

 

Sounds like a full plate, but Nancy Pearl has grander ambitions, potential sponsors please note: “I would love to do a barnstorming tour on foot -- to walk across the country and raise money for small and rural libraries.”

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Zane Grey, Inscribed photograph album depicting Grey and party at Catalina, fishing, and in Arizona. $700 to $1,000
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Eric Taverner, Salmon Fishing...London: Seeley, Service & Co., 1931. $600 to $900
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> The Gentleman Angler. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Ken Robinson, Flyfishers' Progress. [London: The Flyfishers' Club, 2000. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> G. H. Lacy, North Punjab Fishing Club Angler's Handbook. Calcutta: Newman & Co., 1890. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> J. Harrington Keene, Fly-Fishing and Fly-Making for Trout, etc. New York, 1887. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Arthur Macrate, The History of The Tuna Club, Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, California, 1948. $400 to $600
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Joseph D. Bates Jr. Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing. Harrisburg, PA: The Stackpole Company, 1966. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Paul Schmookler and Ingrid V. Sils. Rare and Unusual Fly Tying Materials: A Natural History. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Herbert Hoover, Fishing For Fun - And To Wash Your Soul. New York: Random House, 1963. $400 to $600
  • <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 372: Martin Luther King Jr. March for Freedom Now! Placard. Chicago, 1960. 28 x 22”. $3,000 to $6,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 567: Warhol, Andy. Tate Gallery Exhibition Booklet, Signed on the Cover by Warhol. Tate Gallery, 1971. $700 to $900
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 72: Mitchell, Margaret. <i>Gone With the Wind.</i> New York: The Macmillan Co., 1936. First edition, first issue. $4,000 to $5,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 468: Photo Archive Documenting the 1930s—50s Chicago Jazz and Night Club Scene. A significant collection. $2,000 to $4,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 143: Dr. Seuss. <i>Oh Say Can You Say.</i> 1979, First Edition, Signed. $200 to $300
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 285: [Maps] Thomas G. Bradford. <i>A Comprehensive Atlas, Geographical, Historical & Commercial.</i> Boston: William D. Ticknor, 1835. First Edition. $1,600 to $1,800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 69: Herman Melville. <i>Moby Dick, or The Whale</i>. New York: Random House, 1930. First Kent Trade Edition. $400 to $600
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 295: John James Audoban. Group of 148 Lithographs from the Birds of America. Philadelphia: J.T. Bowen, ca. 1840s. $600 to $800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 54: Langston Hughes. <i>One-Way Ticket.</i> New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1949. First edition. $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 7: Ray Bradbury. <i>The Martian Chronicles.</i> With a Wine Label Signed by Bradbury. Garden City: Doubleday, 1950. First edition $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 121. Frank L Baum. <i>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.</i> Chicago: George M. Hill Co., 1899, 1900. First Edition. $4,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 369. [Declaration of Independence] Peter Force Engraving of the Declaration of Independence. One page; 29 x 26”. From the "American Archives" 1837-1853 series of books. $15,000 to $20,000

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