• <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>The Tragedie of Julius Caesar.</i> London, 1623. 1st appearance in print, Complete from the First Folio. Sold for $175,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Ernst, Max. <i>Mr. Knife and Miss Fork</i>. Paris, 1932. DELUXE EDITION. Sold for $15,625
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Cage, John. Autograph musical leaf from his Concert for Piano and Orchestra, NY, 1958. Sold for $18,750
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Einstein, Albert. Signed Passport Photo for his US citizenship application. Bermuda, 1935. Sold for $17,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Verard, Antoine. Illuminated printed Book of Hours. Paris, 1507. Sold for $7,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Wetterkurzschlussel. German Weather Report Codebook - for Enigma use. Berlin, 1942. Sold for $225,000
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Morelos y Pavon, Jose Maria. Autograph letter signed to El Virrey Venegas, February 5, 1812. Sold for $6,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Milne, A.A. Complete set of <i>Winnie-the-Pooh</i> books. 4 volumes. All first issue points. London, 1924-1928. Sold for $5,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> A 48-star American Flag, battle worn flown at Guadalcanal and Peleliu, 1942-1944. Sold for $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Locke, John. Autograph Letter Signed mourning the death of his friend, William Molyneaux, 2 pp, October 27, 1698. Sold for $20,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Luis de Lucena, <i>Arte de Ajedres,</i> first edition of the earliest extant manual on modern chess, Salamanca, circa 1496-97. Sold for $68,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Carte-de-visite album with 83 images of prominent African Americans & abolitionists, circa 1860s. Sold for $47,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> Vienna & Leipzig, 1918. Sold for $106,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Man Ray, <i>[London Transport] – Keeps London Going,</i> 1938. Sold for $149,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Thomas Jefferson, Letter Signed, to Major-General Nathanael Greene, promising reinforcements against Cornwallis, 1781. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Nicolas de Fer, <i>L’Amerique Divisee Selon Letendue de ses Principales Parties,</i> Paris, 1713. Sold for $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Russell H. Tandy, <i>The Secret in the Old Attic,</i> watercolor, pencil & ink, 1944. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ernest Hemingway, <i>Three Stories & Ten Poems,</i> first edition of the author's first book, Paris, 1923. Sold for $23,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Walker Evans, <i>River Rouge Plant,</i> silver print, 1947. Sold for $57,500.
  • <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 372: Martin Luther King Jr. March for Freedom Now! Placard. Chicago, 1960. 28 x 22”. $3,000 to $6,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 567: Warhol, Andy. Tate Gallery Exhibition Booklet, Signed on the Cover by Warhol. Tate Gallery, 1971. $700 to $900
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 72: Mitchell, Margaret. <i>Gone With the Wind.</i> New York: The Macmillan Co., 1936. First edition, first issue. $4,000 to $5,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 468: Photo Archive Documenting the 1930s—50s Chicago Jazz and Night Club Scene. A significant collection. $2,000 to $4,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 143: Dr. Seuss. <i>Oh Say Can You Say.</i> 1979, First Edition, Signed. $200 to $300
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 285: [Maps] Thomas G. Bradford. <i>A Comprehensive Atlas, Geographical, Historical & Commercial.</i> Boston: William D. Ticknor, 1835. First Edition. $1,600 to $1,800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 69: Herman Melville. <i>Moby Dick, or The Whale</i>. New York: Random House, 1930. First Kent Trade Edition. $400 to $600
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 295: John James Audoban. Group of 148 Lithographs from the Birds of America. Philadelphia: J.T. Bowen, ca. 1840s. $600 to $800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 54: Langston Hughes. <i>One-Way Ticket.</i> New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1949. First edition. $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 7: Ray Bradbury. <i>The Martian Chronicles.</i> With a Wine Label Signed by Bradbury. Garden City: Doubleday, 1950. First edition $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 121. Frank L Baum. <i>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.</i> Chicago: George M. Hill Co., 1899, 1900. First Edition. $4,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 369. [Declaration of Independence] Peter Force Engraving of the Declaration of Independence. One page; 29 x 26”. From the "American Archives" 1837-1853 series of books. $15,000 to $20,000
  • <b>Skinner: Early English Books<br>A Single Owner Sale. July 20, 2018</b>
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Cranmer, Thomas (1489-1556). <i>Catechismus, That is to Say, a Shorte Instruction into Christian Religion...</i> London, 1548. First edition. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Donne, John (1572-1631). <i>Pseudo-Martyr.</i> London: Printed by W[illiam] Stansby for Walter Burre, 1610. First edition. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Fletcher, Giles (1549?-1611). <i>The Russe Common Wealth, or Maner of Gouernement by the Russe Emperour…</i> London, 1591. First edition. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Gabelkover, Oswald (1539-1616). <i>The Boock of Physicke.</i> Dordrecht: Isaack Caen, 1599. First edition. $12,000 to $15,000
    <b>Skinner: Early English Books<br>A Single Owner Sale. July 20, 2018</b>
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Galileo, Galilei (1564-1642) trans. Thomas Salusbury (d. 1666). <i>Mathematical Collections and Translations the First Tome.</i> London, 1661. First edition of Galileo's works in English. $35,000 to $50,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Higden, Ranulphus (d. 1364). <i>Polycronicon.</i> Translated by John Trevisa, with the 1357-1460 <i>Continuation</i> by William Caxton. Southwark, 1527. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Randolph, Bernard (b. 1643). <i>The Present State of the Morea, Called Anciently Peloponnesus…</i> London, 1689. [Bound with] <i>The Present State of the Islands of the Archipelago…</i> $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> <i>The Great Herball Newly Corrected.</i> London, 1539. Folio, ESTC lists three U.S. copies; the last copy offered at auction was incomplete and sold in 1949. $25,000 to $35,000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - July - 2017 Issue

The Untouched Collection

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A collection of old books, untouched for 200 years, was found in Bouillon, Belgium, last month. The reading room where they had remained silent for so long was haunted by the spirit of a “honnête homme” from the turn of the 19th century.



When I reached the Henri Godts’ house sale in Brussels, Belgium, on the phone, I immediately felt the excitement created by an article published by the local weekly Le Vif, a few days earlier. It was entitled: “A 200-year Old Book Collection Discovered Untouched in Bouillon”—Bouillon being a Belgian town close to the French frontier. The assistant of Mr. Godts sighed: “People keep on calling us,” she says. “Because of this article, which is full of mistakes!” It was, as it appears, written by a trainee. “Entering this room is like travelling through time,” he says. “What’s so impressive is that every book has remained in its place, probably where their former owner had left them.”



Yes, and he even... turned down the electric lamps before leaving the room! Indeed, some electrical devices appear on the pictures provided by Mr. Godts. How come? Books sell better with a good story—but this one sounded a little bit too nice. The article also quotes Mr. Godts: “When I first entered the room, I was stricken at once by the authentic atmosphere of an 18th century reading room.” Now, one almost expects to find the skeleton of the owner, sitting in an armchair while holding a first edition of Voltaire in his hand. “This is idiotic,” resumes the assistant of Mr. Godts. “We are no archaeologists!” As a matter of fact, the story appears to be simpler: an old family of Bouillon came to Mr. Godts’ house sale one day to tell him about this collection that had remained in the family house for more than two hundred years, and that they intended to sell. “Only 182 lots offered for sale on June 20 come from this collection,” underlines the assistant of Mr. Godts. But do not be disappointed. Upon examination, though less novelistic than expected, this story is still an extraordinary one.

 

As I was speaking to his assistant on the phone, Mr. Godts came in. “Here’s another one who wants to find out about the book collection!” she says, handing him the phone. Mr. Godts is no newcomer to the game—he’s been running his house sale for 35 years. He explains: “This is indeed a collection that has remained intact for two hundred years. At the end of the 18th century, its owner left France, fleeing from the Revolution (1789—editor’s note). He settled in Bouillon, in this big house, where he built this collection.



The explanations are rendered difficult by the fact that the sellers refuse to reveal their identity—and couldn’t be reached. But beyond the reputation of Mr. Godts, several points suggest that this is indeed a genuine story. First, most of these books date back to the turn of the 19th century. Second, they almost all come in their original wrappers—as issued, as booksellers say. “At the time, you bought your books unbound,” explains Mr. Godts. “The bookseller would deliver them to you fresh from the printing house, uncut, unbound, and protected by mere wrappers. You were then free to have them bound by a professional binder, according to your own taste.” In fact, binders had a privilege, and it was illegal for a bookseller to bind books.



This detail tells something about our book collector. He was probably no wealthy man. Otherwise, these books would be bound—in full morocco—, and marked with his coat of arms, wouldn’t they? Well, the French Revolution was a troublesome period, which created economical uncertainties. Nice bindings from this period are less common; and at a time when the heads of the Nobles were falling like leaves in autumn, it was wise to keep a low profile. As a matter of fact, following the Revolution, every mark of nobility was erased: statues were destroyed, graves were desecrated—the revolutionaries played soccer with the head of Cardinal de Richelieu in the yard of La Sorbonne!—and coats of arms were scratched from books. Yet, Mr. Godts is positive: “Our collector did run away from the Revolution, but he was not of noble birth. He was just a learnt man of his time, and, as such, he built the perfect collection of a “honnête homme.” Travels, science, philosophy, he was interested in all the main topics of the time.”



A perfect collection, really? “Well, several lots are incomplete, it’s true,"  says Mr. Godts. For instance, the classic travels of the Baron de Lahontan set is missing one volume, the edition of the Encyclopaedia of Diderot is also defective, as well as the voyage of La Pérouse, which comes without the crucial atlas. The owner of this collection was clearly more of a keen reader than of a bibliophile—while it takes off some sale value to his collection, it adds a lot of spiritual value to it. This is indeed a genuine personal collection from the time, which is becoming rare. “The house has remained in the same family ever since,” explains Mr. Godts. “Of course, some improvements such as electricity were made along the years; yet, this room has remained almost as a sanctuary. When I was invited, it was locked and it was indeed like entering a time capsule.” Even the furniture dates back to the turn of the 19th century! “The pedestal table, the chairs, and even the globe that you can see indeed date back to the period when the collection was built up,” goes on Mr. Godts. “But their current owners have decided to keep them for themselves.” Thus, the chair we can see on the picture is where our learned reader used to sit. There he would open one of the books sheltered on the shelves all around the room, and start reading. He probably used his globe numerous times to find about some obscure place he had just read about—and the contemporary wooden floor did resound with the sounds of his pace, two hundred years ago. Looking at the picture of the room, it is as if we could hear them ourselves.

 

Of course, the story of an untouched collection saved from limbo is made even more glamorous if it contains “invaluable” (or rather very valuable) books such as the famous Ortelius’ atlas (1575), a masterpiece quoted in Le Vif article, and which easily stands the comparison with the Mercator's—it was estimated around 45,000 euros. “Here again, this is a misunderstanding,” confesses the assistant of Mr. Godts. “This atlas is, indeed, part of the sale, but it's not coming from this particular collection.” As a matter of fact, such a book didn’t match the rest of the collection. Rare were those whose appraisal went beyond a few hundreds euros. The fact that they were, for the most part, unbound, partly explains it. “This collection is a treasure without treasures,” sums up Mr. Godts. “I'm talking about the commercial value of these books. Some are almost nowhere to be found accounts of obscure voyages, but they are not very expensive. In this regard, the appraisals are quite fair, I guess.” This collection nonetheless featured uncommon and attractive titles—enough to satisfy any serious travel books collector. On June 20, I logged in Drouotlive.com, and “e-attended” the sale. Here are a few results—prices given before the 25% commission.

 

- Krunsenstern’s Voyage autour du monde... (Paris, 1821): a nice copy in wrappers, including the atlas (torn). Appraisal: 500/600 euros. Result: 9.000 euros.

 

- Isert’s Voyage en Guinée... (Paris, 1793): a very nice copy in contemporary wrappers, complete of the two engravings. Appraisal: 120/150 euros. Result: 220.

 

- Mungo Park’s famous Voyage dans l’intérieur de l’Afrique... (Paris, 1799): a nice copy in orange wrappers, 3 maps and 5 engravings, with some tears to the back. Appraisal: 120/150 euros. Result: 250.

 

- Milfort’s Séjour dans la nation Crëck... (Paris, 1802). A good copy in wrappers. Appraisal: 100/120 euros. Result: 750 euros.

 

- The French first edition of Patrick Gass' account of Lewis and Clarke’s [sic] historical journey (Paris, 1810): a nice copy with wrappers, hinges partly cut, complete of the map. Appraisal: 120/150 euros. Result: 1.000 euros.

 

- Smith’s Relation historique de l’expédition contre les Indiens de l’Ohio... (Amsterdam, 1769): a very nice copy in wrappers, with a gorgeous map. Appraisal: 200/250 euros. Result: 600 euros.

 

- De Smet’s Mission de l’Orégon... (1848): a very nice copy in wrappers, featuring a beautiful frontispiece and some attractive engravings. Appraisal: 100/120 euros. Result: 200 euros.

 

This is but a short list of the interesting travel books only; “not to mention,” adds Mr. Godts, “a few unusual relations of several travels to the South Sea.” The sale of the collection was supposed to generate 40.000 euros... (results).

 

The trainee at Le Vif did not do a very good job. But let him who has never lost his lucidity in front of an old book be the first to throw a stone at him! There was something extraordinary about this collection. “In my career, this will remain a very special one; this is no ordinary find,” underlines Mr. Godts. But it was not possible, he says, to sell it as a unique lot—it would probably have generated less money that way. Maybe the city of Bouillon should have pre-empted the whole collection to “save” it from being scattered? But this is the fate of most collections, after all. Anyway, this reading room, which no longer exists, still reminds us of the concrete and direct bridges that old books constantly build between then and now—whether luxuriously bound or as issued.

 

Thibault Ehrengardt

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>
  • <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Zane Grey, Inscribed photograph album depicting Grey and party at Catalina, fishing, and in Arizona. $700 to $1,000
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Eric Taverner, Salmon Fishing...London: Seeley, Service & Co., 1931. $600 to $900
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> The Gentleman Angler. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Ken Robinson, Flyfishers' Progress. [London: The Flyfishers' Club, 2000. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> G. H. Lacy, North Punjab Fishing Club Angler's Handbook. Calcutta: Newman & Co., 1890. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> J. Harrington Keene, Fly-Fishing and Fly-Making for Trout, etc. New York, 1887. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Arthur Macrate, The History of The Tuna Club, Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, California, 1948. $400 to $600
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Joseph D. Bates Jr. Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing. Harrisburg, PA: The Stackpole Company, 1966. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Paul Schmookler and Ingrid V. Sils. Rare and Unusual Fly Tying Materials: A Natural History. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Herbert Hoover, Fishing For Fun - And To Wash Your Soul. New York: Random House, 1963. $400 to $600

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