• <b>Auction Pierre Bergé & associés in association with Sotheby’s: Important Books and Manuscripts from the Library of Jean A. Bonna from the 15th to the 20th Century. Sale on April 26, 2017. Exhibition in London March 28-30</b>
    <b>Pierre Bergé & Associés, Apr. 26:</b> Galileo, <i>Discorsi e Dimostrazioni matematiche.</i> Leyde, Elzevier, 1638. Original edition: only known copy of the first state. €700,000 – 900,000
    <b>Pierre Bergé & Associés, Apr. 26:</b> Fables illustrated by Benjamin Rabier. Paris, Tallandier, without date [ca. 1910]. Superb binding doubled in vellum decorated with painted and mosaic decors by André Mare illustrating four fables. €10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Pierre Bergé & Associés, Apr. 26:</b> Gustave Flaubert, draft for the preface of the <i>Memoir for the defense of Madame Bovary</i>, 15-30 January 1857. Exceptiona signed autograph manuscript. €40,000 – 60,000
    <b>Auction Pierre Bergé & associés in association with Sotheby’s: Important Books and Manuscripts from the Library of Jean A. Bonna from the 15th to the 20th Century. Sale on April 26, 2017. Exhibition in London March 28-30</b>
    <b>Pierre Bergé & Associés, Apr. 26:</b> Boccace, <i>The Book of Praise and the Virtue of the Noble and Cleric Ladies.</i> Verard, 1493. First edition of the French version attributed to Laurent de Premierfait. €40,000 – 60,000
    <b>Pierre Bergé & Associés, Apr. 26:</b> Exceptional set of 15 original bindings by Jean de Gonet, on rare editions illustrated by Picasso, Matisse, Miro or original editions of Bataille or Radiguet.
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “America the Beautiful”
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington, Tongue-in-Cheek, Writes James McHenry About His Wife or Mistress—But Funding the Continental Army is the Real Topic
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Young’s Map of the United States
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> President Lincoln & His Most Profitable Client, the Illinois Central Railroad
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Thanks Former Pro-Slavery and Newly Republican Congressman for a Fiery Anti-Slavery Speech at a Philadelphia Campaign Rally
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “A Visit From St. Nicholas” - great association copy inscribed by Clement C. Moore
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Einstein Agrees to Allow “a Short Book on the Hydrogen Bomb” to Use His Statement Made on Eleanor Roosevelt’s TV Show
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The Building Blocks of Albert Einstein’s Creative Mind
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> A Unique Manuscript Map of Block Island Sound Including Fisher’s and Gardiner’s Islands, the Hamptons, and Montauk Point
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> J.R.R. Tolkien Writes his Proofreader with a Lengthy Discussion of the Lord of the Rings, Including Criticism of Radio Broadcasts of his Work
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Six Benjamin Franklin Signed Receipts – Including his Earliest Obtainable Autograph — Acknowledging a Donation to the Famous Library Company He Founded, and Five Payments for His Pennsylvania Gazette
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Sherman Dishes on Lincoln & Thomas, Meade, Sheridan, Halleck & Grant
  • <b>Bonhams, March 9. Fine Books and Manuscripts, Including the Kennedy Years</b>
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> BROWNING, ELIZABETH BARRETT. Autograph Manuscript Initialed ("E.B.B."), being the working notebook for the poems contained in <i>The Seraphim and Other Poems</i>. $400,000 to 600,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> WILDE, OSCAR. Two leaves, pp 31-34, from the first appearance of <i>The Picture of Dorian Gray in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine for July, 1890</i>, with Wilde's autograph revisions. $40,000 to 60,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>Comedies, Histories and Tragedies; Published according to the true Originall Copies. Second Impression. [THE SECOND FOLIO.]</i> $200,000 to 300,000
    <b>Bonhams, March 9. Fine Books and Manuscripts, Including the Kennedy Years</b>
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> KENNEDY, JOHN FITZGERALD. Photograph Signed ("John F. Kennedy") and Inscribed, 8 x 10 inch gelatin silver print, of Senator Kennedy and Miss Barelli, at the swearing of the secretarial oath for Miss Barelli. $1,200 to 1,800
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> COOPER, JAMES FENIMORE. Autograph Manuscript, being Chapter XXVII of <i>Afloat and Ashore</i>. $15,000 to 20,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> IRVING, WASHINGTON. Autograph Manuscript, being Chapter 20 from Volume IV of <i>The Life of George Washington</i>. $20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Bonhams, March 9. Fine Books and Manuscripts, Including the Kennedy Years</b>
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> VERNE, JULES. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("Jules Verne"), being the complete short story "<i>Une fantaisie de docteur Ox</i>". $100,000 to 150,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> ALCHEMY. <i>[The Crowning of Nature, or Coronatio Naturae.]</i> Original alchemical manuscript on paper, ruled in red, with watermark of the arms of Schieland. $100,000 to 150,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> DE JODE, CORNELUS. 1568 - 1600. <i>Quivirae Regnu, Cum Alija Versus Borea</i>. [Antwerp: Arnoldum Coninx, 1593]. $7,000 to 10,000
    <b>Bonhams, March 9. Fine Books and Manuscripts, Including the Kennedy Years</b>
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> HOOKER, JOSEPH DALTON. <i>The Rhododendrons of Sikkim-Himalaya; Being an Account, Botanical and Geographical, of the Rhododendrons Recently Discovered in the Mountains of Eastern Himalaya</i>… $7,000 to 10,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> CATLIN, GEORGE. <i>North American Indian Portfolio. Hunting scenes and amusements of the Rocky Mountains and prairies of America. From drawings and notes of the author, made during eight years' travel.</i> $20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. HESLER, ALEXANDER. Platinum print, 8 3/4 x 6 3/4 in, of a beardless Lincoln, 1860.<br>$2,000 to 3,000
  • <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> THE PAPERS OF BREVET MAJOR GENERAL JOHN GROSS BARNARD (1815-1882), Chief Engineer of the Army of the Potomac. Estimate: $75,000-100,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> ALVIN LANGDON COBURN. London. With 20 photogravures by Coburn and text by Hilaire Belloc, London and New York: 1909. First edition. Est: $4,000-6,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> WILLIAM FADEN, A Plan of New York Island, with part of Long Island, Staten Island & East New Jersey. London: 1776. Estimate: $5,000-8,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> MAX BEERBOHM, Lord Curzon delivering an oration. Original drawing with collage. London, 1912. Est: $2,000-3,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> AMERICAN REVOLUTION, Recueil des Loix Constitutives des Colonies Angloises. A Philadelphie, et se vend a Paris: Cellot & Jombert, 1778. First collected edition in French. Estimate: $500-800
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Confederate General Joseph Johnston's copy of Sherman's General Orders No. 65 announcing the final agreement of Surrender, 27 April 1865. Est: $4,000-6,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> JOHN KEATS, Lamia, Isabella, the Eve of Saint Agnes and Other Poems. London: Taylor and Hessey, 1820. First edition of Keats’s third book.. Estimate: $5,000-7,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> M. T. Cicero's Cato Major, or his discourse of Old-age: With Explanatory Notes. Philadelphia: Benjamin Franklin, 1744. Est: $5,000-8,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> WINSTON S CHURCHILL, History of the English Speaking Peoples. London: Cassell, 1956-58. First editions. Est: $1,500-2,500

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - March - 2017 Issue

A Geezer’s Listicle: A Few Tips for Sellers from a Late Adopter

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I confess, I’m old enough to remember the “Summer of Love” (and what’s more I was there). That makes me over 70 and counting. In the intervening 50 years the content of the antiquarian, rare and collectible book trade has stayed pretty much the same, while the delivery system for information, sales, communication and shipping has changed dramatically as new technology evolved.

 

For a change-resistant older person (“Moi,” as Miss Piggy would say) who stayed analog long after the rest of the world went digital, this was an ongoing problem. Though I've been a dealer for more than 40 years, I made the tech transition reluctantly, slowly, late or not at all.

 

The items on the list are meant to reassure our older Rare Book Hub Monthly readers that if I can do it, you can do it too. 

 

Here’s hoping that this Geezer’s Listicle has at least one piece of information you didn’t already know.

 

SIZE MATTERS: LEGAL SIZE FLAT RATE ENVELOPES

 

The USPS has generously provided us with array of free high quality packing materials. The problem is that sellers often don’t really understand what’s available.

 

For example, the plain priority mail flat rate envelope measures 12.5” wide by 9.5” tall. This size mailer is readily available at almost every post office in America at no cost.

 

However, you’d be surprised how many people don’t know about the next size up: the legal size priority flat rate envelope. Though it is the same height, the legal size is substantially wider. It’s 15” inches across and it will hold quite a bit more material for only a very small increase in the cost of shipping. 

 

The caveat is that it is not readily available, in fact it’s not available at all at most post offices. The legal size and other specialized sizes and products have to be ordered directly from the USPS. For the legal flat rate envelope the minimum order is a 10 pack, it is free, and the USPS will ship as many as you want to you for free. The link to order this product is: https://store.usps.com/store/browse/productDetailSingleSku.jsp?productId=P_EP14L 

 

While the flat rate and legal size priority envelopes and many of the other supplies are free, there are some products shown that do cost money, so look before you click. And be prepared to wait at least a week and sometimes considerably longer before your supplies arrive. You can view all the shipping products offered by the USPS at: https://store.usps.com/store/browse/category.jsp?categoryId=shipping-supplies&q_pageSize=30&viewAll=true

 

SHIPPING BY PAYPAL EVEN IF THE ORDER DID NOT COME THROUGH EBAY


Most people by now, even the old slow learners, have Paypal accounts, especially if they buy or sell on eBay. Sellers use these accounts to receive funds from buyers and to pay for shipping. The good thing about Paypal is it’s reliable and almost everybody knows how to work it. But did you know you can ship using your Paypal account to pay for postage and generate a label even if the order did not originate from eBay? Well you can, you only need to know the link (which has never been easy to find). You can use this link to buy postage for anything, it does not have to be an eBay sale or even a business transaction. That link is: https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_ship-now

 

Clicking on it will take you to your Paypal account and allow you to generate a label for most (not all) sizes and classes of US mail. The cost of shipping is somewhat discounted over going to the post office. There are numerous other ways to pay for shipping and generate shipping labels, but since Paypal is easy, convenient and most people already have it, this is a link worth knowing.

 

LEARNING TO USE A SMARTPHONE

 

Talk about late adopter, I got a smartphone less than a year ago. Until then I had one of those little flip jobbies. I fed it pricey minutes (25 cent each) and used it hardly at all. I’d figured out Skype (and paid for minutes there too) so why would I need anything fancier or more sophisticated?

 

The truth is in the 21st century you need a smartphone, defined as “noun: a mobile phone that performs many of the functions of a computer, typically having a touchscreen interface, Internet access, and an operating system capable of running downloaded applications.”

 

You need a smartphone to text, because texting (not calling) is the way the world communicates these days. Yes, there is a learning curve, and I might add for an older person, a rather substantial learning curve.

 

You’ve probably noticed all those thick colorful photo illustrated manuals at your local big box store aptly titled: “iPhone/Android for Seniors.” Personally I’ve found them useless.

 

It’s hard to learn a smartphone from a book. It’s also not so easy to learn a smartphone from a YouTube video (of which there are many.) But you can - I guarantee you - learn a smartphone, and faster than you might think, from those wiz young customer service reps at T-Mobile. 

 

Let me repeat that T-MOBILE. One more time: T-MOBILE. My tech smart friends steered me to them precisely because their customer service reps were so good and I’ve been truly grateful for the advice. My T-Mobile rep Lynnie (age 23, on the job for five years) taught me the basics in five installments spaced out over a month. There was no charge for the service once I’d signed up for a plan.

 

Be warned your aging brain can only learn so much in one sitting, so when you set up your account make arrangements to come back multiple times for about a half hour each. Do it with the same person each time and by the end of the first month you will be able to text, use the camera, and search, and the heavy lifting in the settings, customizing, and installing apps department will be done by somebody else (somebody young, smart and tech oriented) who will be only too pleased to help you, and help you again and again and again. 

 

Repeat T-Mobile: trust them, use them. They know what they’re doing, their customer service is superior and you are never too old to learn how to do it too.


4. GOOGLE DRIVE & DOCS

 

Did you hate it when Microsoft stopped supporting XP? Do you have a Google account? Do you use gmail?

 

It’s time to learn Google Drive and some or all of its many features like Google Docs. Google Drive provides most of the same functions that can be found in Microsoft Office (where they are called more familiar names like Word, Excel, Powerpoint, etc.) but the Google versions are free, shareable and editable in a variety of ways. Most of the functions including documents, spreadsheets, photos, slides, etc are available on Google Drive in similar (but not identical) format as the more familiar Microsoft products. Google Drive is not hard to set up and it comes with 15GB free memory.

 

Unlike Microsoft office where your files live only on your computer, using Google Drive your files can be accessed, edited, shared anytime anywhere from any computer by logging into your Google account/gmail and then clicking on the little icon with nine little squares forming one big square in the upper right of your Google toolbar.  (Reminder: You’ll only see those little squares when you are logged into Google). Clicking on it will take you to a multi-icon display. Click on the Drive icon and you are ready to begin a very useful learning experience.

 

Like the smartphone there is a learning curve for Google Drive, unlike the smartphone it’s pretty easy to pick it up from YouTube videos. Start with “beginner tutorials” (of which there are many) and go on to the specific videos that cover what you want to learn. 

 

For booksellers Google Docs is a good way to catalog material either individually or in groups in a way that can instantly be shared with anyone in the world with a Google account. There are also photo features that are appealing, albeit not instantly self evident.

 

Like the smartphone you can only learn so much at a time. I’ve found my attention span for this kind of instructional info is about a half hour at a time, then I go into overload and forget it all. It’s not hard, it’s free, a lot of it is semi-intuitive. Once you get started you’ll wonder why it took you so long to try it.

 

Online (mainly YouTube) videos and images

 

You already use YouTube videos for news and entertainment like viewing the latest Saturday Night Live skits, but you can learn anything, and I do mean anything, from these on line “videos.”

 

I use Google as my search engine. Say you want to find videos about “identifying first editions,” type that phrase into the search box and what will come up is mostly text. 

 

Now look to the top of your screen just below the search box and you’ll see the words: All, Shopping, Images, Video displayed as the first line across the top of the screen.  The word “All” will be highlighted in blue. Now move over to your right and click on the word “Videos” and you’ll see a very different selection consisting only of videos, short and long, that have to do with the topic. 

 

Here’s the link for identifying first editions in case you’re wondering what’s available: https://www.google.com/search?q=identifying+first+editions&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#q=identifying+first+editions&tbm=vid

 

A word of caution, when it comes to knowledge based info (as opposed to tech based instruction) you have to be pretty cautious. If you have a choice between a video by Joe Shmoe, the Amazon selling ace, and an ABAA dealer’s version of the same topic, the video generated by the ABAA dealer is almost sure to be more accurate and reliable.

 

Another good place to start is on that very same line with the word “images.” I recently picked up an early 20th century German children’s book illustrated by Gertrud Caspari. The book was in a language I didn’t read, and it was an artist I had not seen before. To find other visual examples of her work I Googled "Gertrud Caspari," when the first screen came I went to that same top line, clicked on “images” and a vast array of her work opened in an instant.  Want to see what that looks like try:

https://www.google.com/search?q=Gertrud+Caspari.&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwir8uqvyZ_SAhVih1QKHU4rAB4Q_AUICSgC&biw=1084&bih=606

 

Did you like any of the individual pictures? Click on the pix and more information and choices, including the source page and the ability to share can be found.

 

TINY URL - Make a long URL shorter

 

Notice that the last two links I’ve given have long URLs. If you are looking for a way to make them (or any) URL shorter try TINY URL https://tinyurl.com/.  

 

Copy the long URL, go to the TinyURL.com site, and paste the long URL into the box and in a fraction of a second you’ll get a short one. 

 

For example I pasted the long Caspari link with 137 characters into the “Make tiny URL” box, and came up with https://tinyurl.com/hbvhtjr  which will take you to exactly the same place but with a lot fewer characters. Very simple and very handy.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Arader Galleries, March 25, 2017: Spring 2017 Auction</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> Ruffed Grous, Plate 41. John James Audubon from <i>Birds of America</i>. Double Elephant Folio. First Edition Engravings with Original Hand Color. $45,000 – 60,000
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> Rosate Spoonbill, Plate 321. John James Audubon from <i>Birds of America</i>. Double Elephant Folio. First Edition Engravings with Original Hand Color. $110,000 – 150,000
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> American White Pelican, Plate 311. John James Audubon. First Edition Robert Havell Aquatint Engraving with Original Hand Color From <i>Birds of America</i> Double Elephant Folio.<br>$100,000 – 140,000
    <b>Arader Galleries, March 25, 2017: Spring 2017 Auction</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> Jaguar, Plate 101. John James Audubon. $12,000 – 16,000
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> <i>Birds of Asia</i>. John Gould (1804-1881). London: Taylor and Francis for the Author, 1850-83. $80,000 – 130,000
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> <i>The Birds of Europe</i>. John Gould (1804-1881). London: by Richard and John E. Taylor, published by the Author 1832-37. $60,000 – 90,000
    <b>Arader Galleries, March 25, 2017: Spring 2017 Auction</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> <i>The Birds of Great Britain</i>. John Gould (1804-1881). London: Taylor and Francis for the author, [1862]-1873.<br>$30,000 - 45,000
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> <i>The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands</i>. Mark Catesby (1682/83–1749). London: [1729-] 1731-1743 [-1747].<br>$275,000 – 350,000
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> <i>Dell’arcano del mare</i> [Books 1-4]. Robert Dudley (1573-1649). Firenze: Francesco Onofri, 1646. $50,000 - 70,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, March 25, 2017: Spring 2017 Auction</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> <i>Cartes Generales de Toutes les Parties du Monde</i>. Nicholas Sanson D’Abbeville (1600-1667). Paris: The Author and Pierre Mariette, 1658 [but 1659]. $20,000 - 30,000
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> <i>A Map of the Inhabited Part of Virginia, containing the whole of the Province of Maryland with Part of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and North Carolina.</i> Joshua Fry and Peter Jefferson.<br>$150,000 – 300,000
    <b>Arader Galleries, Mar. 25:</b> <i>Voyage dans l’Interieur de l’Amerique du Nord execute pendant les annees 1832, 1833 et 1834.</i> BODMER, Karl (illustrator) - Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied. $525,000 – 750,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30: Printed & Manuscript African Americana</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Malcolm X, typed manuscripts for the <i>LA Herald Dispatch</i> column "God's Angry Men," 1957.<br>$200,000 to $300,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Frederick Douglass, Autograph Letter Signed to George Alfred Townsend, Washington, 1880.<br>$40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Carte-de-visite album featuring a previously unrecorded image of Harriet Tubman, 1860s.<br>$20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30: Printed & Manuscript African Americana</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Collection of documents from the Montgomery Improvement Association, Alabama, 1955-63. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Martin Luther King, Jr., working draft of the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," Alabama, 1963. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> <i>Benjamin Bannaker's Almanac</i> for 1795, Baltimore. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30: Printed & Manuscript African Americana</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Collection of 41 letters addressed to Rebecca Primus, 1854-72.<br>$20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Abby Fisher, <i>What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking</i>, first edition, San Francisco, 1881.<br>$10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Victor H. Green, <i>The Negro Motorist Green-Book for 1941</i>, New York, 1940. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Toni Morrison, <i>The Bluest Eye, </i>reviewer's copy, New York, 1971. $4,000 to $6,000.
  • <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. March 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Potter (Beatrix). The Tale of Peter Rabbit, first edition, first issue, [1901]. Part of an extensive, private Beatrix Potter collection. £15,000 - 20,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Dodgson (Charles Lutwidge). The Hunting of the Snark, first edition, with original printed dust-jacket, 1876.<br>£7,000 - 9,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Buckland Wright (John). Pervigilium Veneris: The Vigil of Venus, number 1 of 100 copies (Christopher Sandford's copy), Golden Cockerel Press, 1939.<br>£2,000 - 3,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. March 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Kelmscott Press. Keats (John). The Poems, one of 300, orig. vellum, 8vo, Kelmscott Press, 1894. £1,800 - 2,200
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Greenhill (Elizabeth).- Morison (Stanley) and Kenneth Day. The Typographic Book, 1450-1935, bound in dark green goatskin by Elizabeth Greenhill, 1963. £6,000 - 8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Fitzgerald (F. Scott). The Great Gatsby, first edition, first state dust-jacket, New York, 1925. £25,000 - 35,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. March 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Dionysius, <i>Halicarnassensis</i>. Antiquitates Romanae, Editio princeps, Treviso, Bernardinus Celerius, 24 or 25 February, 1480. £4,000 - 6,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Canon Law. [Laurentius Puldericus. Breviarum decreti], manuscript in Latin, on paper, [?Germany], [c. 1450].<br>£5,000 - 7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Swimming. Percey (William) The Compleat Swimmer: or, the Art of Swimming, first and only edition, by J.C. for Henry Fletcher, 1658. £5,000 - 7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. March 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Binding with silverwork by Anthony Nelme. The Holy Bible, containing the Old Testament and the New: : newly translated out of the original tongues, Oxford, John Baskett, 1716. £10,000 - 15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> George IV's copy. Nash (John, architect). The Royal Pavilion at Brighton, one of 10 copies, 1826. £8,000 - 10,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Blake (William, 1757-1827). "With Dreams upon my bed thou scarest me & affrightest me with Visions", 1825. £700 - 1,000
  • <b>Now in press: 19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> <i>The First American Magna Carta. English Liberties.</i> Boston, 1721.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Babbage presentation to Peel, the man who killed the Difference Engine 1832
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Stamp Act. 1765
    <b>Now in press: 19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Central Park Photographs by Prevost 1862
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Salem Witch Trials. Wonders of the Invisible World 1693
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Mammoth print of Millie-Christine, "The Carolina Twins" c. 1868

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