• <b>19th Century Shop.</b> CURTIS, EDWARD. <i>Original glass plate photograph, Honovi – Walpi Snake Priest, prepared by Curtis for the printing of The North American Indian</i>, c.1910
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN WEST.), Watkins, Taber, Savage, and others. <i>Magnificent Album of Mammoth Photographs of the American West, with other subjects various</i>, ca. 1865-1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>Darwin Family Photograph Album</i>. Down, Kent, 1871-1879
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (SECRET SERVICE). <i>The photographic archive, papers, and relics of William Kennoch, Secret Service Agent</i>. Various places, 1870s and 1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN REVOLUTION). <i>Daguerreotype Portrait of Baltus Stone, the earliest photo of a Revolution veteran,</i> 1846
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Friedrich Nietzsche, <i>Also Sprach Zarathustra</i>, Leipzig, 1908. Sold for $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk</i>, Vienna & Leipzig, 1918. Sold for $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Arthur Middleton, manuscript notes from Congress, Philadelphia, 1782. Sold for $55,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Joseph Smith, <i>The Book of Mormon</i>, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. Sold for $67,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b><br>L. Frank Baum, <i>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz</i>, first edition & issue, Chicago & New York, 1900. Sold for $23,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b> Mark Twain, <i>The Adventures of Tom Sawyer</i>, first American edition, Hartford, 1876. Sold for $13,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> George Washington, Partly-printed Document Signed as Commander-in-Chief, 1783. Sold for $13,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> Album with more than 130 Civil War-era signatures, including 18 presidents, 1864-2010. Sold for $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b><br>Sir Isaac Newton, <i>Opticks</i>, first edition & issue, London, 1704. Sold for $87,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> Euclid, <i>Elementa geometriae</i>, first edition, Venice, 1482. Sold for $62,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> William Shakespeare, <i>The Winters Tale</i>, first edition, London, 1623. Sold for $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 25:</b> Edward Ruscha, set of 14 first editions, 1963-78. Sold for $45,000.
  • <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. <i>Die Grundlage der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie.</i> Leipzig: Johann Ambrosius Barth, 1916.<br>$80,000 – 120,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in English, Signed Integrally ("Isaac Newton"). $50,000 – 70,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life</i>. London: John Murray, 1859. $25,000 – 35,000
    <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. <i>The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.</i> London: Benjamin Motte, 1729.<br>$20,000 – 30,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEISENBERG, WERNER. Autograph Manuscript entitled "<i>Entwicklung der Theorie der Elementarteilche,</i>” [1964].<br>$15,000 – 25,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> BERNOULLI, DANIEL. <i>Hydrodynamica, sive De viribus et motibus fluidorum commentarii.</i> Strasbourg: Johann Heinrich Decker for Johann Reinhold Dulsecker, 1738. $5,000 – 7,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> [TARKOVSKY, ANDREI ARSENIEVICH.] STRUGATSKY, BORIS AND ARKADY. Typed Manuscript for <i>Stalker</i>, being the director's working script, 1977. $150,000 – 200,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEMINGWAY, ERNEST. Typed Manuscript of "Marlin Off the Morro: A Cuban Letter," n.p., [1933]. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> SALINGER, JEROME DAVID. 4 Autograph Letters, 2 of which Signed ("Jerry") and 6 Typed Letters, 2 of which Initialed ("J"). $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> PASTERNAK, BORIS LEONIDOVICH. Typed Manuscript Carbon, "Doktor Zhivago," with some typed corrections, Moscow, 1948. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> MILNE, ALAN ALEXANDER. Autograph Manuscript Signed 3 times ("A.A. Milne"), entitled "Peace with Honour: An Enquiry into the War Convention," 1934.<br>$30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> FROST, ROBERT. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("Robert Frost"), titled "Gold for Christmas," 1952. $15,000 – 20,000
  • <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Excessively Rare Benjamin Franklin Imprint. Estaugh (John). <i>A Call to the Unfaithful Professors of Truth</i>, Philadelphia: Printed by B. Franklin, 1744. €7,000 – 10,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Original Signed Volume from the Dean Swift's Library. [Swift (Dr. Jonathan)] Grotius (Hugo). <i>De Jure Belli ac Pacis Libri Tres</i>, Amsterdam: (J. Blaeu) 1670. €10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Cresswell (Samuel Gurney). <i>A Series of Eight Sketches in Colour; together with a Coloured Map of the Route</i>, London: (Day & Son) July 25, 1854.<br>€15,000 – 20,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Of Legendary Rarity - First Printing of Shakespeare Outside England. Shakespeare (Wm.). <i>The Works of Shakespeare</i> In Eight Volumes. Dublin: 1726.<br>€7,000 – 10,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Lewin (W.). <i>The Birds of Great Britain</i>, 8 vols in 4, with 335 hand-coloured plates, 1795 – 1801. €1,500 – 2,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> 18th Century Manuscript Relating to Massachusetts Bay, c. 1750.<br>€350 – 500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Alexander (Wm.). <i>Picturesque Representations of The Dress and Manners of the Chinese</i>, with 50 hand-coloured plates, 1814. €600 – 800
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Manuscript Estate Atlas - Neville (Arthur Richard). <i>The Estate of Sir John Coghill Bart</i>, 1791. €10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Unique Collection of Ballads by Brendan Behan Behan. €3,000 – 4,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Original Manuscript of Edith Somerville's Unpublished Children's Book. Somerville (Edith). <i>GROWLY-WOWLY. Or, The Story of the Three Little Pigs</i>. €3,500 – 5,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Full Set of Cuala Press Broadsides with fine hand-coloured illustrations by Jack B. Yeats, 1908 – 1915. €4,000 – 6,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Eyzinger (Michael). <i>Ad Leonis Belgici Topographicam atque Historicam Descriptionem</i>, [Cologne:] 1586. €3,000 – 4,000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2016 Issue

Kurt Sanftleben: The Third Career

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Kurt Sanftleben, at 63, has already retired from two careers.  In 1994, he retired as a lieutenant colonel from the United States Army with a little over twenty years of service, and in 2012 he retired once more, the second time from a civilian position as the Director of the United States Marine Corps Research Center.  Now, he has become a serious bookseller and since 2013 a member of the American Booksellers Association of America.  What went wrong?  We were dying to know.

 

The answer:  nothing. 

 

He is a restless intellectual with a master’s degree and doctorate, who takes on substantial challenges and masters them.  That he’s a rare book dealer today tells you he likes challenges. Who would give up a well-paid job to embrace the uncertainties that collectible paper embodies today?  Not many I suppose but Kurt did, and it is quite apparent that he made a good decision.

 

So what’s his story?

 

Although Kurt had been selling used books on a part-time basis since 1998, he only began concentrating on antiquarian material a dozen years ago at the age of 51, and at the time was unencumbered by memories of the days when buyers knew less, broad assertions often went unchallenged and prices were higher.  “Today” he told me, “most of my customers understand the field, understand rarity and importance and understand value.  This is the way it has been for me from the beginning, and I’m comfortable with it.”

 

The rare book field is a magnet for gifted intellectuals.  It isn’t that they often strut their stuff but many have the goods and it’s most noticeable in how they select what they buy and describe what they sell. 

 

The field today is complex with potholes and opportunities cheek by jowl.   Categories that were once thought to be rare and robust have been exposed on the Internet as unbearably common.  Pre-Internet we had only anecdotal evidence.  Today we have hard numbers and declining prices in many sectors.

 

But if you became a dealer post-Internet you were aware of these inventory overhangs and had the opportunity to seek categories and niches that, even post Internet, are authentically rare and desirable.

 

And that’s what Kurt has done.  The ABAA is a bookseller’s association but it provides a broad umbrella under which other categories of printed and related objects find a place.  For Kurt, the category is what he calls, “personal narratives:  diaries, journals, photo albums, correspondence collections, scrapbooks, and similar paper items that provide unique perspectives on American history or culture.”  

 

And I asked Kurt to tell me how he came to sell what he does –

 

As a kid, I read a lot of series books like Landmark, Chip Hilton, Clint Lane, and the Hardy Boys, and the bookshelves in my room were packed with them.  So, I guess the collecting bug may have bit me way back then although the infection pretty much laid dormant until resurfacing when I was in my early forties.  At the time, I was still on active duty, and while on a temporary assignment in Portsmouth, England as a participant in a NATO wargame, I happened to visit a flea market during some free-time.  In one stall, I stumbled upon a cache of large Kubasta pop-up books and was immediately hooked by their bright artwork and clever mechanics.  I bought them all without even haggling over price, and for the next year or so I purchased better pop-ups and movables wherever I found them.  With time I realized that when I came across nice duplicates while out hunting, I could buy them for resale to support my habit.  One thing led to another, and, almost before I knew it, I was a part-time book dealer selling children’s books, illustrated books, American history, and advertising ephemera at antique shows around DC and eventually book fairs in the Mid-Atlantic area.  When eBay came along, I jumped on board and shortly thereafter began listing my stock on AbeBooks as well. 

 

Around the same time, and understanding full well that I was going to have a long life after I left the army, I completed a doctorate with a concentration in higher education at the College of William and Mary while still on active duty.  I’d already earned a master’s degree in the humanities, and at the time, I thought a doctorate might help me land a teaching job at a junior college after I hung up my uniform.  But that didn’t happen.  Instead, after I retired, I was very fortunate to be selected to serve in a dual-hatted civilian position as a Vice-President at the Marine Corps University and the Director of the Marine Corps Research Center where, among other responsibilities, I oversaw the operation of the Library of the Marine Corps as well as the U. S. Marine Corps Archives and Special Collections.  While there, I became fascinated with our collections of personal papers and manuscripts, and I began to wonder if others might be interested in adding similar types of material to their collections.  That led me to ask my customers, and I found, to my surprise, that most of them, especially the younger ones, didn’t consider themselves to be book collectors.  Rather, they collected topics that interested them or were important in their lives.  Sure, they bought books, but they also collected photographs, sheet music, tacky souvenirs, advertising, prints, and almost anything else related to whatever their topical focus might be.  So, around 2010 I began to add things like that to my inventory and soon found they outsold my books . . . by a lot.  Unique items, especially diaries and photograph albums that told a personal story, were especially popular.

 

Manuscripts are a broad category that intersects every field, be they fiction and poetry, science, history and even crimes.  Place us in your world –

 

Absolutely, but again, it’s not just manuscripts but other types of personal narratives as well, things like photograph albums or scrapbooks full of ephemera.  For me, it’s not just any diary or album.  They have to have some type of hook.  I look for items that tell a story about some facet of their original owners’ lives and also provide insight into some aspect of American history or culture. 

 

For example, I recently sold a collection of detailed manuscript notebooks written by an ardent Unionist from Alabama who was conscripted into the Confederate Army, sentenced to death for mutiny, served time in several military prisons, had his death sentence commuted by Jefferson Davis, escaped during the confusion of Sherman’s attack on Atlanta, and soon thereafter enlisted in the Union Army.  I can’t imagine that even those who don’t give two hoots about Civil War wouldn’t find this narrative riveting.  I figure this man’s story is good for a non-fiction book, a novel, and possibly even a screenplay.

 

Some of my other recent sales include a 1920s photograph album that documented a patient’s stay in the then-cutting-edge Georgia State Tuberculosis Sanatorium at Alto, a 1910s photograph album documenting life on the Colville Indian Reservation in Washington that was compiled by the young female leader of a three-member team from the U. S. Allotment Service living there while they parceled out homesteads from tribal lands to individual Native Americans, and a 1940s collection of large, personal,  humorous, hand-painted envelopes that the first Bozo the Clown, Pinto Colvig  (who was also a Disney animator and the first voice of Goofy, Grumpy, and Doc), used to mail letters and home-made greeting cards to a close friend.

 

Oh, before I forget, I probably ought to mention that we do sell some books too, they just aren’t our main interest.

 

Tell us how you sell.  In our discussion you mentioned that broadly speaking you are doing about a third of your business from direct quotes and catalogs, another third at shows and a further third from online sales at your website, AbeBooks, Biblio, and eBay.  Selling is an art.  How does that truism translate into your experience?

 

For me to sell the type of things I do, I first have to understand exactly what an item is.  Most of the time, this takes a little research.  I don’t mean looking up items in bibliographies, although that can be helpful.  I’m talking about traditional research, and that usually requires some combination of in-person or on-line visits to academic libraries, archives, or museums as well as the use of interlibrary loan resources and electronic data collections like EBCO, Gale, or JSTOR.  

 

Of course, writing the description is important too.  At their best, I want my write-ups not only to describe an item fully but to also relate the originator’s personal story in a way that makes it clear to potential customers, both collectors and institutions, why that item is important and why it should become part of their collection.  That holds true, whether I’m trying to make a sale at a book fair, through a catalog, or on-line.  I know that some people think that selling on the Internet is a rather static and effortless way of doing business, but the truth is that for on-line sales, especially eBay sales, I converse just as much, if not more, with potential customers by email and message as I do in person at fairs or by telephone for direct quotes or catalog sales. 

 

I understand that your wife is your partner in this business.  You do shows together and she organizes the business side of the house.  Tell us about this aspect of the business.

 

Sure, Gail retired shortly after I did.  She’d been a civilian plans and logistics officer within the Department of Defense for over 35 years, and her last job was as a Deputy Director within the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs.  She was a little envious my free time after I retired and had really gotten to hate her grueling 90-minute one-way commute both to and from work on I-95 each day, so leaving her bureaucratic headaches behind and joining me in the book business made perfect sense.   She went to CABS, the Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar, after she retired but doesn’t get too involved in the book-side of our business.  Instead, she puts her logistics and management experience to work maintaining our spreadsheets, organizing stock, packing it for shows, and coordinating our travel and transportation.  She also keeps tabs on how we do at each show, what types of things sold and what didn’t, and then adjusts what we take the next time around.  While we’re at a show she’s usually the one who goes out scouting while I manage the booth, and she always manages to find some interesting things. 

 

Something else I should mention is that Gail came up with our trading name, Read’Em Again Books, twenty years ago when I was first starting out  At the time, I had an inventory of a couple thousand collectible children’s books that I sold to adults, primarily nostalgia sales, at antique shows, so it made a lot of sense.  Now that our inventory and business model are dramatically different, we’ve discussed changing it but, for the time, decided to keep it because we have so many customers that know us that way.

 

You have a history of persistence, demonstrated by your pursuit of education, your military service, your executive experience in higher education and library management, and now in the field of collectible objects.  How does it feel and what does the future look like to you and Gail?

 

That’s an interesting question, especially the part about “persistence.”  To me, persistence implies sticking with something that is difficult or unpleasant.  Of course, I’ve worked hard and been in some challenging situations, and there were times when I’ve been frustrated , but to be honest, I loved my time in the military, my time as a student, and my work in higher education and library administration.  I have to say that all of it was very enjoyable, satisfying, and fulfilling. 

 

As for the future, I like to think that Gail and I will be able to keep on selling the type of things we do now.  Although the topics that sell best will certainly change with time, I think that whatever their interests, collectors will continue wanting to add unusual and unique items to their collections.  Also, I think that institutions will want to continue to offer their users original source material with personal details that students, faculty, and other researchers can use to flesh out and enliven theses, dissertations, and publications.  That’s what we offer now and what we plan to offer in the future. 

 

I suspect that the well of hard-copy, as opposed to digital, personal narratives won’t run dry for a number of years, and, to mix metaphors, we’ll be able to mine nuggets of diaries, albums, correspondence, and scrapbooks from the hidden crevices of auctions, eBay, estate sales, and antique malls for a long time.  Gail and I both enjoy what we are doing now and plan to keep doing it for the foreseeable future.  We’ll “continue the march” as long as we continue to have fun.

 

Rare Book Monthly members and readers, in total more than 20,000, will be interested both in your story and in your experience.  We all think we can sell a book or two.  You’re finding a path to a third career and buying very interesting things.  RBH members here now can follow various links

 

To the Read’Em Again Books website and (in Kurt’s words, “sorely neglected”) Facebook page and blog.

 

To Kurt’s recent catalogues: Catalog 16-2 (Summer/Fall, 2016) and Catalog 16-1 (Spring/Summer, 2016)

 

To a video-taped interview with Kurt posted on the ABAA website [link]

 

A list of shows where Kurt and Gail will be exhibiting:

 

29 October 2016 –Boston Book Print and Ephemera Show (Marvin Getman’s Satellite Show), Back Bay Events Center, 180 Berkeley St., Boston, MA 02116

 

3-5 February 2017 – The Pasadena Antiquarian Book, Print, Photo and Paper Fair, Pasadena Convention Center, 300 E Green St, Pasadena, CA 91101

 

10-12 February 2017 – The 50th California International Antiquarian Book Fair, Oakland Marriott City Center, 1001 Broadway, Oakland, CA 94607

 

10 March 2017 – New York City Book and Ephemera Fair (Marvin Gettman’s Satellite Fair), Wallace Hall, Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, 980 Park Avenue New York, NY 10028

 

21-23 April 2017 – Florida Antiquarian Book Fair, The Coliseum, 535 4th Avenue North, St. Petersburg, FL 33701

 

28-29 April 2017 – Washington Antiquarian Book Fair, The Sphinx Club, 1315 K Street NW, Washington DC  20005

 

5-7 May 2017 – St. Louis Fine Print, Rare Book & Paper Fair to Benefit the St. Louis Mercantile Library at the University of Missouri St. Louis, JC Penney Conference Center, UMSL-North Campus, 1 University Boulevard, St. Louis, MO

 

 

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [ARTILLERY]. KITCHEN, D.C. <i>Record of the Wyoming Artillerists.</I> Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania: Alvin Day Printer, 1874. $2,000-4,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> UNITED STATES AND MEXICAN BOUNDARY COMMISSION. EMORY, William Hemsley. <i>Report of the United States and Mexican Boundary Survey, Made under the Direction of the Secretary of the Interior…</i><br>$3,000-6,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> RICHARDSON, William H. <i>Journal of William H. Richardson, a Private Soldier in the Campaign of New and Old Mexico…</i>. Baltimore: John H. Woods, 1848. $3,000-6,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> GARCÍA CONDE, Pedro. <i>Carta geografica general de la Republica Mexicana…</i> $30,000-60,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> EMORY, William Hemsley. <i>Map of Texas and the Countries Adjacent: Compiled in the Bureau of the Corps of Topographical Engineers; From the Best Authorities…</i> [Washington, 1844]. $7,500-15,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> THORPE, Thomas Bangs. <i>Our Army at Monterey. Being a Correct Account of the Proceedings and Events which Occurred to the “Army of Occupation”…</i> Philadelphia, 1847. $400-800
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> <i>The Rough and Ready Songster: Embellished with Twenty-Five Splendid Engravings, Illustrative of the American Victories in Mexico…</i> New York; St. Louis, Mo [ca. 1848].<br>$500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> CURRIER, Nathaniel (publisher). <i>The Brilliant Charge of Capt. May At the Battle of Resaca de la Palma (Palm Ravine) 9th of May…</i> $150-300 
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [RINGGOLD, SAMUEL]. WYNNE, James. <i>Memoir of Major Samuel Ringgold, United States Army: Read Before the Maryland Historical Society, April 1st, 1847.</i> Baltimore, 1847. $500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [TAYLOR, ZACHARY]. <i>Life of General Taylor from the Best Authorities.</i> New York: Nafis and Cornish; St. Louis, Mo.: Nafis, Cornish & Co., 1847.<br>$500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> TILDEN, Bryant Parrott, Jr. <i>Notes on the Upper Rio Grande, Explored in the Months of October and November, 1846, on Board the U.S. Steamer Major Brown…</i> Philadelphia, 1847.<br>$5,000-10,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [WORTH, WILLIAM J.]. <i>Life of General Worth; To Which is Added a Sketch of the Life of Brigadier-General Wool.</i> New York: Nafis & Cornish; St. Louis, Mo.: Nafis, Cornish & Co., 1847.<br>$200-400
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “America the Beautiful”
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington, Tongue-in-Cheek, Writes James McHenry About His Wife or Mistress—But Funding the Continental Army is the Real Topic
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Young’s Map of the United States
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> President Lincoln & His Most Profitable Client, the Illinois Central Railroad
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Thanks Former Pro-Slavery and Newly Republican Congressman for a Fiery Anti-Slavery Speech at a Philadelphia Campaign Rally
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “A Visit From St. Nicholas” - great association copy inscribed by Clement C. Moore
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Einstein Agrees to Allow “a Short Book on the Hydrogen Bomb” to Use His Statement Made on Eleanor Roosevelt’s TV Show
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The Building Blocks of Albert Einstein’s Creative Mind
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> A Unique Manuscript Map of Block Island Sound Including Fisher’s and Gardiner’s Islands, the Hamptons, and Montauk Point
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> J.R.R. Tolkien Writes his Proofreader with a Lengthy Discussion of the Lord of the Rings, Including Criticism of Radio Broadcasts of his Work
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Six Benjamin Franklin Signed Receipts – Including his Earliest Obtainable Autograph — Acknowledging a Donation to the Famous Library Company He Founded, and Five Payments for His Pennsylvania Gazette
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Sherman Dishes on Lincoln & Thomas, Meade, Sheridan, Halleck & Grant
  • <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 202. Geronimo - Apache. £600-800
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 225.<br>A Chief of the Desert - Navaho. £1000-1500
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 267.<br>An Oasis in the Bad Lands. £600-800
    <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 303.<br>The Scout in Winter - Apsaroke. £800-1200
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 320.<br>Sitting Bear - Arikara. £500-700
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 475. <br>A Nakoaktok Chief's Daughter. <br>£600-800

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