• <b>Case Antiques: Winter Art and Antiques Auction. January 21, 2017</b>
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> Cassilly Adams, Civil War era watercolor on paper painting of the navy vessel upon which he was stationed: the U.S.S. Osage. $3,000 – 5,000
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> Audubon, John James and John Bachman, <i>The Quadrupeds of North America.</i> New York: V.G. Audubon, 1854. 3 volumes. $2,400 – 3,400
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> Roulstone, George. <i>LAWS OF THE STATE OF TENNESSEE.</i> Printed and published by George Roulstone, Knoxville, (Tennessee), 1803. $2,000 – 3,000
    <b>Case Antiques: Winter Art and Antiques Auction. January 21, 2017</b>
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> Heap, Gwin Harris. <i>CENTRAL ROUTE TO THE PACIFIC, FROM THE VALLEY OF THE MISSISSIPPI TO CALIFORNIA…</i> Philadelphia/London, 1854.<br>$1,800 – 2,200
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> FDR’s personal copy of <i>The Great Smoky Mountains"</i> by Laura Thornborough. Published by Thomas Y. Crowell Company, New York, 1937.<br>$1,500 – 1,800
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> Latour, Arsene Lacarriere. <i>HISTORICAL MEMOIR OF THE WAR IN WEST FLORIDA AND LOUISIANA IN 1814 – 1815. WITH AN ATLAS.</i> Philadelphia, 1816.<br>$1,200 – 1,500
    <b>Case Antiques: Winter Art and Antiques Auction. January 21, 2017</b>
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> [Kennedy Autograph Signature] Kennedy, John F. <i>Profiles in Courage.</i> New York Harper & Brothers, (1956).<br>$1,200 – 1,500
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> Sam Houston signed land document, granting Elias Riddle 100 acres in Bledsoe County, Tennessee "in the grassy cove…" dated February 22, 1828.<br>$1,000 – 1,200
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> "The State of Kentucky with Adjoining Territories" Map, by John Payne, engraved by John Scoles, published by John Low, New York, 1800. $500 – 700
    <b>Case Antiques: Winter Art and Antiques Auction. January 21, 2017</b>
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> Civil War era letter and 4 carte de visites, including Confederate Generals. $300 – 500
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> 12 Bank of East Tennessee Pre Civil War Bills. $350 – 450
    <b>Case Antiques Jan. 21:</b> 2 Early Homeopathy books by Alva Curtis. $300 – 400
  • <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>SAXTON, Christopher. <i>The Travellers Guide being the best Mapp of the Kingdom of England and Principality of Wales</i>. London, [1583, but c.1716].
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>VISSCHER, Claes Jansz. <i>Novissima et Accuratissima Leonis Belgici</i>. Amsterdam, Claes Jansz Visscher, [1611-1621 or later].
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b> PTOLEMAEUS, Claudius. <i>Decima Asie Tabula</i>. Ulm, Lienhart Holle, 16 July 1482.
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>WIT, Frederick de, and Gerard VALK. <i>Orbis Terrarum Nova et Accurata Tabula</i>. Amsterdam, Gerard Valk, [c.1690-1700].
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>APIANUS, Petrus. <i>Astronomicum Caesareum</i>. Ingolstadt, Peter Apian, 1540.
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>CASSINI, Jean-Dominique. <i>Carte de la Lune</i>. Paris, Jean-Dominique Cassini, 1787.
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b> PTOLEMAEUS, Claudius. <i>Geographicae enarrationis libri octo</i>. Argentoragi, 1525.
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>[SAXTON, Christopher]. <i> [An Atlas of England and Wales]</i>. [London, Christopher Saxton, 1579].
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b> Commission des sciences et arts d'Egypte. <i>Description de l’Égypte</i>… Paris, Imprimerie impériale - Imprimerie royale, 1809-1828.
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b> CHURCHMAN, John. <i>To George Washington President of the United States of America this Magnetic Atlas or Variation Chart is humbly inscribed by John Churchman</i>. Philadelphia, 1790.
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>APIANUS, Petrus. <i>Tipus Orbis Universalis</i>. Vienna, Johannes Camertius, 1520.
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>LORIOT, A[uguste], [after] Nicolas LANE. <i>[Pocket globe]</i>. London, 65 New Bond Street, 1809.
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>BLAEU, Johannes. <i>Grooten Atlas</i>. Amsterdam, Joan Blaeu, 1662-1665.
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>INGEBORG BRUN, Emmy. <i>Mars efter Lowell’s Glober 1894-1914</i>. Denmark, [c1915].
    <b>Daniel Crouch Rare Books</b><br>LUTHER, Martin. <i>Der vierde Teil aller Bücher vnd Schrifften des thewren seligen Mans</i>. Gedruckt zu Jhena, Durch Christian Rödinger, 1556.
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “America the Beautiful”
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington, Tongue-in-Cheek, Writes James McHenry About His Wife or Mistress—But Funding the Continental Army is the Real Topic
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Young’s Map of the United States
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> President Lincoln & His Most Profitable Client, the Illinois Central Railroad
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Thanks Former Pro-Slavery and Newly Republican Congressman for a Fiery Anti-Slavery Speech at a Philadelphia Campaign Rally
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “A Visit From St. Nicholas” - great association copy inscribed by Clement C. Moore
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Einstein Agrees to Allow “a Short Book on the Hydrogen Bomb” to Use His Statement Made on Eleanor Roosevelt’s TV Show
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The Building Blocks of Albert Einstein’s Creative Mind
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> A Unique Manuscript Map of Block Island Sound Including Fisher’s and Gardiner’s Islands, the Hamptons, and Montauk Point
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> J.R.R. Tolkien Writes his Proofreader with a Lengthy Discussion of the Lord of the Rings, Including Criticism of Radio Broadcasts of his Work
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Six Benjamin Franklin Signed Receipts – Including his Earliest Obtainable Autograph — Acknowledging a Donation to the Famous Library Company He Founded, and Five Payments for His Pennsylvania Gazette
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Sherman Dishes on Lincoln & Thomas, Meade, Sheridan, Halleck & Grant

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - August - 2016 Issue

Welcome to Paris! Visit the French capital in the 18th Century

7205ac7e-8050-4e71-b93e-a096ea38a7d4

A look at Paris in the 18th century.

A few months ago, a team from the University of Lyon-2, France, made an audio reconstruction of Paris in the 18th century. Though captivating, the video (news.cnrs.fr/articles/sound-18th-century-paris) lacks an essential part: people. Fortunately, a famous book renders the customs and lifestyle of the Parisians of the time. Let's take a walk in the dirty, insane and yet fascinating streets of the French capital on the edge of the Revolution. Your guide? The second edition of Mercier's Tableau de Paris (Amsterdam, 1782).

 

Louis-Sébastien Mercier (1740-1814) was a prolific writer and philosopher, who signed dozens of plays as well as hundreds of articles about Paris that were published in various "gazettes" (or newspapers). In 1780, eleven years after his famous L'An 2440, he compiled dozens of them in what was to become his most famous work, Tableau de Paris. The first edition (Neuchâtel, 1780) came out as a 2-volume set and though Mercier refused to give into satire, several of his criticisms displeased the government, forcing him to settle in Switzerland for a while. There, he augmented and corrected his work and published a second edition in 1782. “I've written no catalog or inventory,” he underlines. “I only mean to paint, not to judge.” His work, a playful reading, gives an invaluable description of a city that Voltaire—whom Mercier despised—once described as a "chaos of wonders"; and indeed, Paris appears in Mercier's writing like a maze of horrors, beauties and bizarreries. "Just like in a painting of Rembrandt, darkness prevails in my painting," he says. "It is not my fault, but the subject's." In the following "visit", facts are all taken from Mercier's book. Take it as a written reconstruction.

 

Watch out! Hell on wheels.

 

Unlike in London, there are no sidewalks in Paris, and pedestrians are all the potential victims of mad vehicles driven at full speed by young Phaetons. Coming out of your house, you can see a doctor passing in a coach, a dancing master in a cabriolet, a master of arms in a trolley, and a prince driven by six horses, all galloping as if in the middle of a desert field. Thus, the threatening wheels that proudly carry the rich are stained with the blood of all the innocents whom they ran over. These accidents have become so common that there are fixed prices for a broken arm or leg. Watch out! Watch out! cry the drivers from afar, sometimes sending some mad dogs running in front of their equipage. The philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau was badly hurt by a Danish dog in 1776, and the owner of the vehicle hardly stopped while the philosopher was lying on the ground.

When a coach arrives, you have to step aside, holding your breath; and be extra-careful when you come across a layer of manure on the pavement—the first paved streets appeared in Paris in 1184. It was spread by some rich and sick man, who wants to damp the noise of the coaches that pass under his windows. And a silent coach is more dangerous than a noisy one! Furthermore, the manure soon turns into a black and stinking mud where you drop through up to your knees. Welcome to Paris!

 

Mud Cleaners

 

The streets of Paris are dirty, and a muddy gutter runs in the middle of many of them, carrying wasted water—and sometimes worse. When it rains, it overflows and the "mud cleaners" offer you to use a wooden plank for a small amount of money. Watch out! Or you will lose your balance and end up in the middle of filth. You may wonder how a Parisian, jumping over a muddy stream while wearing a "trois-marteaux" whig, some white stockings and a striped coat, eventually gets from faubourg S. Jacques to faubourg St. Honoré with only a few stains on his stockings. Only a Parisian can work such miracles!

 

Paris is a dirty city. When the smell of excrement gets to your nose, you know that some cesspit has been emptied in the street the previous night. Most of the time, the emptiers do not bother taking the fecal material out of town and pour the contents of the pits directly into the gutter; this terrible poison slowly drifts into the streets until it reaches the Seine river, where the water carriers fill up their buckets every morning before bringing them back to their customers.

 

Slaughterhouses

 

Are you suddenly trying not to step into a thick layer of blood curdling? Then you must be close to the butchers' shops. They are located in the heart of the city and the blood of the slaughtered animals runs on the pavement. The din of the dying animals is terrible. An ox is tied on the ground, a heavy sledgehammer breaks its head, a long knife cuts its throat open, its steaming and boiling blood flows like a river from its deadly wound; yet it is still fighting and groaning. The ordeal of these sacrificed creatures is almost unbearable. Sometimes, a beef breaks through and runs away in the streets, spreading terror among children and women; and those who run after it are even more dangerous! With their swollen necks, their red eyes, their dirty legs and blood-stained aprons, the butchers are fierce and blood-thirsty men; consequently, whenever they kill a man, they are more severely punished than common people. But in the middle of the butcher's shops, in the midst of deadly vapors and the wailings of expiring animals, you find some vile prostitutes, sitting on boundary stones and openly selling their bodies. They are monstrous and disgusting creatures, whose expressions are ruder than those of a dying ox! And who enjoys such women? The crude butchers.

Paris is small, and many places known as the "faubourgs" (or suburbs), are yet to be properly constructed. There, you will find many wastelands; especially near the quartering houses. The wasted parts of quartered animals are thrown into the open, and left to rot. The smell is terrible. Haste your step when you hear a pack of stray dogs fighting over a warm carcass! Who knows? They might fight over some decomposed human body part, as they are quite common on those killing fields. They come from the surgeons, who steal corpses at Clamart, the common grave, to study anatomy. When they are done, they throw away the remains. It might sound horrible, but don't worry: this beautiful city with rotten entrails, treats her living even worse than her dead.

 

Casual Walk

 

You are now about to cross the notorious Pont-Neuf, a bridge where many innocent people have lost their purses or their lives—sometimes both. It used to be the favorite hunting ground of all the villains of the capital. But don't be like those ignorant people from the countryside, who evoke Cartouche's exploits as if he were still alive—he was executed in 1721. There is no safer passage in Paris today. The thieves themselves are now afraid to cross it, as the "human flesh sellers" stand at the end of it to enroll them in the King's army. There was a time when these determined recruiters would capture and beat anyone to force them in, but these days are over; and they can use lies and tricks to enroll thieves only.

 

Did you notice that the Parisians are not wearing swords anymore? These deadly weapons have been replaced by canes, and this put an end to these old quarrels that used to spill so much innocent blood over stupid arguments. Even women carry canes today, just like in the 11th century. Women are so frivolous, their existence mainly consists in being watched. I see that you are looking at the remarkable hair of this elegant woman. You admire their color and shape. But they are not hers, they come from the head of a dead woman! And the pains she endures to fix them are unbelievable. She suffers eye pains, pedicle diseases and scalp inflammation just to follow this bizarre fashion.

 

Suddenly, you run into a weird gallant scene: a man walks alongside his belle, carrying her small dog in his arms. Women have become incredibly fond of pets, and they cook them the best meals while some poor people starve to death in the streets. Don't you inadvertently step on the paw of their pets! Else they will pretend, but never forgive! You are burning at such a sight, and you want to laugh in the face of this idiot lover to teach him to be a man. These dogs, when dying, get a better burial than the poor, who are taken to Clamart.

 

Fashion

 

Paris is the European capital of fashion. And this is a ever-changing art. A stern and prudish woman goes to bed one evening and wakes up the following day as a coquettish and easy-going girl. Hairdressing is the most changing of all arts, and people take it dead serious—especially women, who scorn at any ill-dressed head. "Who's that man?" asks a lady, while considering one of the most brilliant men of his time. How come she sounds so disdainful? Well, he has unkempt hair!

 

Ô, innocent stranger! You might open your eyes in surprise but yes!, we do have masters in manners, who teach our youths the art to please. They will tell you how to smile with elegancy in front of a mirror, to subtlety have a quick look at someone, to pick up some tobacco from your snuffbox with grace or to bow with lightness. These people are fond of novelty, and a new way to curl a lock of hair will start a craze. The enthusiasm is instantaneous and such man who was common and boring a few days ago, becomes a hero—at least for a few days.

 

When you have dinner in town, you have to leave the place without a word; but the hostess has to notice your leave, and to shout a vague word to you from afar, to which you shall answer with a monosyllabic word. Then you come back eight or ten days later to dine again, or else you will be said to be impolite. This is a demanding world with many unwritten rules; but once you enter this society, you will have to stick to it. Because as soon as you will enter the house of some reasonable people, they will laugh at you.

 

The Wages of Sin

 

After walking in the heart of the city, reading the ill-spelt signs of the merchants—ignorance engraved in golden letters!—, let's go to the faubourgs, where the rabble lives. You might want to enter one of the 700 "cafés" of Paris, where they serve black water for coffee, dangerous lemonades and insane liquors. You will meet poverty-stricken people, who have come to enjoy the free warmth of the wood stove; the discussions are annoying: ignorant people talk about the latest books they have not read and the latest plays they have not seen. Let's get out of here, straight to the quarter of La Courtille—where the notorious Cartouche grew up, and where Ramponeau became more famous than Voltaire by selling the pint of wine for 3.5 sols only. On sunday, the people here devote themselves to drinking and dissoluteness—a way to forget their misery.

 

There are 30,000 prostitutes in Paris, most of them so poor that they have to rent suggestive pieces of clothes to attract customers! What are the police doing? Every week, they pick up the prostitutes and take them to the prison St. Martin. The next morning, they are taken to the Hospital in an open wagon, standing and pressed against each other; one is crying, the other is wailing, a next one hides her face in her hands; the proud ones stare at the people and defy the booing of the bourgeois. Should prostitution be abolished in Paris, some 20,000 girls would die from want.

 

Inglorious Send-Off

 

Do not get offended at all the beggars either, the police also pick them up from time to time and took them to the "dépôts" (or jails) where many meet their death. In the years 1769, 70 and 71, they came so hard on them, some people thought they meant to eradicate them. That's the way people die in our so-called enlightened century; to be poor is a crime, nowadays.

 

Now that we have left La Courtille, take a look at this huge building, this is an hospital, the Hôtel-Dieu, where many poor people come to die. Every night, 50 of them are sent to the common grave of Clamart on a carriage. Can you imagine this dark equipage roaming the streets at night? It is quite an horrible sight. Twelve men drive it while a priest walks in front of it, holding a cross and a bell. It leaves the Hôtel-Dieu at 4 A.M, ringing its bell as if to spread fear in the hearts of the living. These bodies have no shroud, they're simply wrapped into floor clothes. Then they are thrown into an open pit, and covered with lime. No tombstones, no pyramids, the place is naked. On All Souls' Day, the poor go there. They know they shall end up here one day, joining their friends and relatives in the grave. They kneel down and pray, and then they leave to drink. At night, the young surgeons surreptitiously enter the place to steal the fresh corpses—thus the poor are even deprived of their bodies.

 

What Will Become of Paris?

 

Looking at this painting, you wonder what will become of Paris. Just like Thebes, Persepolis or Carthage, it is bound to disappear. Its destruction under the slow and merciless hand of time is inevitable. The earth shall cover the last remains of this city, and the weeds shall grow in its bosom. When this river, so usefully restrained between some sumptuous quays of stone, shall overflow, the waters will form some muddy morasses and the places where all these people live today will be infected with poisonous animals! What do we know about disasters? What do we know? Paris destroyed. Ô, I will always say, just like in Memmon: what a pity!

 

Thibault Ehrengardt

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Arader Galleries: Winter 2017 Auction. January 28, 2017</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Long-Billed Curlew, Plate 231. John James Audubon. First Edition Robert Havell Aquatint Engraving with Original Hand Color From <i>Birds of America</i>. London, 1827-1838. 37 1/2 x 24 3/4” sheet, 49 1/2 x 37” framed
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Summer, or Wood Duck, Plate 206. John James Audubon. First Edition Robert Havell Aquatint Engraving with Original Hand Color From <i>Birds of America</i>. London, 1827-1838. 39 x 25 1/2” inches sheet, 49 1/2 x 37” framed
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Fish Hawk or Osprey, Plate 81. John James Audubon. First Edition Robert Havell Aquatint Engraving with Original Hand Color From <i>Birds of America</i>. London, 1827-1838. 38 1/4 x 25 1/4" sheet, 50 x 37” framed
    <b>Arader Galleries: Winter 2017 Auction. January 28, 2017</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Great Cinereous Owl, Plate 351. John James Audubon. First Edition Robert Havell Aquatint Engraving with Original Hand Color From <i>Birds of America</i>. London, 1827-1838. 38 x 25” sheet, 50 x 37” framed
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> A Flying Lizard, Surrounded by Beetles and Other Insects. Herman Henstenburgh, (Hoorn 1667 - 1726). Watercolor and gouache on paper. 7 x 10 1/4" sheet, 13 1/2 x 18 3/4" inches framed
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Marco Polo's Sheep (Ovis Poli). Joseph Wolf (1820 - 1899). Pencil and Watercolor, heightened with touches of white. Signed and dated Lower right "J. Wolf 1875". 11 1/4 x 15 1/4" sheet
    <b>Arader Galleries: Winter 2017 Auction. January 28, 2017</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Winter Scene in Kamchatka. Attributed to John Webber, R.A. (1751-1793). Oil on Canvas. 25 x 36 1/2" canvas, 30 x 41” framed
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Winter River Scene. Cornelius David Krieghoff (1815-1872). Oil on Canvas. 16 x 20” canvas, 25 x 29” framed
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Grand Canyon of Arizona from Hermit Rim Road. Thomas Moran (1837-1926). Chromolithograph. New York: Atcheson, Topeka and Sante Fe Railway System, 1913. Printed by American Lithographic Co. 31 3/4 x 41 1/2" sheet
    <b>Arader Galleries: Winter 2017 Auction. January 28, 2017</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Occidentalis Americae Partis... Theodore de Bry (1528-1598). Engraved Map. Frankfurt, 1594. 13 1/4 x 17 1/2" sheet, 24 1/2 x 29” framed
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Nouveau Monde. Nicolas De Nicolai (1517-1583). Engraved map. Amsterdam, 1602. 12 x 15 1/2"
    <b>Arader Galleries Jan. 28:</b> Typus Universalis Terrae... Petrus Apianus (1495-1552) & Reiner Gemma Frisius (1508-1555). Engraved map. Basel: Reisch, 1583. 8 1/4 x 12” sheet
  • <b>Now in press: 19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> <i>The First American Magna Carta. English Liberties.</i> Boston, 1721.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Babbage presentation to Peel, the man who killed the Difference Engine 1832
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Stamp Act. 1765
    <b>Now in press: 19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Central Park Photographs by Prevost 1862
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Salem Witch Trials. Wonders of the Invisible World 1693
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Mammoth print of Millie-Christine, "The Carolina Twins" c. 1868
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26: Alphonse Mucha & Masters of Art Nouveau: The Harry C. Meyerhoff Collection</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Princezna Hyacinta</i>, 1911. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b><br><i>Les Maîtres de l'Affiche</i>, 5 volumes, Paris, 1896-1900.<br>$35,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Job</i>, 1896.<br>$15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26: Alphonse Mucha & Masters of Art Nouveau: The Harry C. Meyerhoff Collection</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Bleuze - Hadancourt Parfumeur</i>, circa 1899.<br>$15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Lygie</i>, 1901. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, <i>Babylone d'Allemagne</i>, 1894.<br>$30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26: Alphonse Mucha & Masters of Art Nouveau: The Harry C. Meyerhoff Collection</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Zodiac / La Plume</i>, 1896. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>The Seasons</i>, 4 panels on silk, 1900.<br>$15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, <i>Aristide Bruant dans son Cabaret</i>, 1893. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26: Alphonse Mucha & Masters of Art Nouveau: The Harry C. Meyerhoff Collection</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Monaco / Monte-Carlo</i>, 1897. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>Medee / Sarah Bernhardt</i>, 1898. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries, Jan 26:</b> Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, <i>Confetti</i>, 1894. $40,000 to $60,000.
  • <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. <i>Die Grundlage der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie.</i> Leipzig: Johann Ambrosius Barth, 1916.<br>$80,000 – 120,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in English, Signed Integrally ("Isaac Newton"). $50,000 – 70,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life</i>. London: John Murray, 1859. $25,000 – 35,000
    <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. <i>The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.</i> London: Benjamin Motte, 1729.<br>$20,000 – 30,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEISENBERG, WERNER. Autograph Manuscript entitled "<i>Entwicklung der Theorie der Elementarteilche,</i>” [1964].<br>$15,000 – 25,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> BERNOULLI, DANIEL. <i>Hydrodynamica, sive De viribus et motibus fluidorum commentarii.</i> Strasbourg: Johann Heinrich Decker for Johann Reinhold Dulsecker, 1738. $5,000 – 7,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> [TARKOVSKY, ANDREI ARSENIEVICH.] STRUGATSKY, BORIS AND ARKADY. Typed Manuscript for <i>Stalker</i>, being the director's working script, 1977. $150,000 – 200,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEMINGWAY, ERNEST. Typed Manuscript of "Marlin Off the Morro: A Cuban Letter," n.p., [1933]. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> SALINGER, JEROME DAVID. 4 Autograph Letters, 2 of which Signed ("Jerry") and 6 Typed Letters, 2 of which Initialed ("J"). $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> PASTERNAK, BORIS LEONIDOVICH. Typed Manuscript Carbon, "Doktor Zhivago," with some typed corrections, Moscow, 1948. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> MILNE, ALAN ALEXANDER. Autograph Manuscript Signed 3 times ("A.A. Milne"), entitled "Peace with Honour: An Enquiry into the War Convention," 1934.<br>$30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> FROST, ROBERT. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("Robert Frost"), titled "Gold for Christmas," 1952. $15,000 – 20,000
  • <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Western Manuscripts & Works on Paper. January 25, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Zenobius. Epitome proverbiorum Tarrhaei et Didymi [graece], Florence, [possibly Bartolomeo de' Libri for] Filippo Giunta, [after 23 September] 1497. £15,000 – 20,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Phalaris. [Phalaridis tyranni Apollonii Philosophi pythagoraei Epistolae [Graece], Venice, Bartholomaeus Pelusius, Gabriel Bracius de Brisighella, Johannes Bissolus and Benedictus Mangius, 18 June, 1498. £10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Orpheus. Argonautica. Hymni [graece], Florence, [Bartolomeo de' Libri for] Filippo Giunta, 19 September, 1500. £20,000 – 30,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Western Manuscripts & Works on Paper. January 25, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Primaleon.- Los tres libros del muy esforçado cavallero Primaleon et Polendos su hermano…, Venice, Giovanni Antonio Nicolini da Sabbio for Giovanni Battista Pederzano, February, 1534. £20,000 – 30,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Bodoni (Giambattista). Manuale Tipografico, 2 vol., Parma, Giambattista Bodoni, 1818. £8,000 – 12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Music. Gafurius (Franchinus). Practica musicae, Brescia, Angelus Britannicus, 23 September, 1497. £10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Western Manuscripts & Works on Paper. January 25, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Bonaventura (Saint). A group of three Franciscan mystical texts, [14th century]. £15,000 – 20,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Boccaccio (Giovanni). Trattatello in laude di Dante, decorated manuscript on paper, Florence, first half of 15th century. £30,000 – 40,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Greek medical manuscript. Iatrosophion, decorated manuscript on paper, Greece (probably Crete), [first half of 16th century]. £8,000 – 12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Western Manuscripts & Works on Paper. January 25, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Heraldry. Nayler (George). Album of coats of arms compiled from the papers of Sir George Nayler, 114 coats of arms, most with manuscript captions. [17th, 18th & early 19th centuries]. £1,500 – 2,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Zoffany (Johan). Autograph Letter signed to Messrs. Raikes & Co., merchants, 1p. with conjugate blank and address panel, 17th July 1801, "In consequence of an order I received from General Claud Martin…”<br>£500 - 700
    <b>Forum Auctions Jan. 25:</b> Bury (Richard de, Bishop of Durham). Philobiblon...sive de amore librorum, Oxford, Joseph Barnes, 1599.<br>£4,000 – 6,000

Article Search

Archived Articles

Ask Questions