Rare Book Monthly

Articles - May - 2016 Issue

An Open Letter to the Trustees of the Armory

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Rebecca Robertson, President and Executive Producer

Park Avenue Armory

643 Park Avenue

New York, New York 10065

 

Dear Ms. Robertson;

 

Concerning the Armory and its relationship to the printed word:

 

Trends arc up and down.  Stand too close and there seems no mystery because the data points all point in one direction.  Stand back to see these same trends over decades and it’s apparent public taste both wanes and waxes.  The Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America has sponsored an annual book show for over half a century in New York. It is the most important antiquarian book event of the year. It is a New York tradition. But today, the New York Antiquarian Book Fair finds itself in the crosshairs of they who decide policy for the Park Avenue Armory, and who are considering offering the book fair’s slot to another organization. What the hell, who needs books anyway?

 

Should public television replace Nova with the Jerry Springer show because the latter is more popular in the moment? Or maybe we should convert the New York Public Library into a video game arcade. That may make it a more popular hang out for young people, and isn't what appeals to the young all that matters in our society, the 12-29 age demographic?

 

This year marks the 400th anniversary of the passing of William Shakespeare. For 400 years, his legacy has endured. No, it has more than endured. It has been celebrated by generations. Shakespeare represents so much of our shared culture, our love for literature and art, our thirst for knowledge, our appreciation of heritage. After 400 years, should we blow out the candles on Shakespeare?

 

The Armory was the brainchild of many famous and important book-collectors of the 19th century who were also significant national figures.  In walking away from their wishes, intentions, and preferences, you opt for money and convenience over the city’s, the nation’s and the world’s commitment to the printed word.

 

J. Pierpont Morgan, the great banker, industrialist and book collector of the turn of the twentieth century employed part of his fortune to leave New York the great Morgan Library. Industrialist Andrew Carnegie invested much of his fortune dotting the American landscape with public libraries. The man who is the answer to New York's iconic question, "Who's buried in Grant's tomb?" spent the last days of his life feverishly finishing his autobiography. It has undoubtedly been offered to collectors at many New York Antiquarian Book Fairs.

 

That commitment to the book, which to you may seem less if not absolutely unimportant compared to rents and cash flow, will endure long after today's latest fads are forgotten. The ABAA booksellers and the collectors who have kept the book alive through changing times have not forgotten what endures fads and time.

 

In the larger scheme of things the printed word will always have a place.  Whether that place is 643 Park Avenue in April 2017 remains to be seen.

 

It should be.

 

Bruce McKinney

Managing Partner

Rare Book Hub and Americana Exchange

bmckinney@rarebookhub.com

415.823.6678

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Exodus 10:10 to 16:15. Complete Biblical scroll sheet in Hebrew, a Torah scroll panel. Middle East, ca. 10th or 11th century.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Copernicus Refuted. (Astronomy.). Scientific manuscript of a course of studies at Collège de la Trinité, Lyon. 1660s.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Israel’s War of Independence and the Early Days of the IDF. 58 photographs presented to Israel Ber, IDF officer and later convicted spy.
    <b>19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Early Unpublished Darwin letter on the races of man. Autograph Letter Signed [to Henry Denny]. Down, Kent, June 1, [1844].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Classic Image of American Slavery. Kimball, M. H. <i>Emancipated Slaves</i>. New York: George Hanks, 1863.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> (Underground Railroad.) Scaggs, Isaac. Important Runaway Slave Poster: $500 Reward Ran away, or decoyed from the subscriber…
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2: Vintage Posters</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> <i>Keep Calm and Carry On</i>, designer unknown, 1939. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, <i>Le Journal / La Traite des Blanches</i>, 1899. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> <i>"Let Us Go Forward Together,"</i> designer unknown, 1940. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2: Vintage Posters</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, <i>Babylone d'Allemagne</i>, 1894. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Frank Beatty, <i>Out of the Running</i>, 1929. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> James Montgomery Flagg, <i>Wake Up America Day</i>, 1917. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2: Vintage Posters</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> <i>Danté / Sim • Sala • Bim!</i>, designer unknown. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Alphonse Mucha, <i>[Zodiac]</i>, 1900. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Rick Griffin, <i>Jimi Hendrix Experience / John Mayall</i>, 1968. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2: Vintage Posters</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Abram Games, <i>Join the ATS</i>, 1941. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Aldo Mazza, <i>Torino / Esposizione Internazionale</i>, 1911. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Aug 2:</b> Robert Motherwell, <i>Julliard School / Dedication - Lincoln Center</i>, 1969. $3,000 to $4,000
  • <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Newton. <i>Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica</i>. London, 1687.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Josephus. <i>De antiquitate Judaica.</i> Lubeck, 1475-76.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Carlerius. <i>Sporta fragmentorum, Sportula fragmentorum</i>. Brussels, 1478-79.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Fridolin. <i>Der Schatzbehalter</i>. Nuremberg, 1491.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Pinder. <i>Der beschlossen gart des rosenkrantz marie</i>. Nuremberg, 1505.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Isidorus Hispalensis. <i>Synonyma de Homine</i>. Nuremberg, 1470-71.
    <b>Bonhams, inviting consignments for Sep 27:</b> Durer. Sammelband including <i>Underweysung der messing</i>. Nuremberg, 1525-29.
  • <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>
    <b>TO AKABA! T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt. Books, manuscripts and pictures. On exhibition 16 to 24th July at Maggs' new premises 48 Bedford Square.</b>

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