Rare Book Monthly

Articles - April - 2016 Issue

There Will Always be Collectors

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Sir Thomas Phillips, the exceptional collector [1792-1872]

Not so long ago books were essential to learning.  They were long embraced for their content and visual appeal.  They were the basic tool for learning to read, one third of the essential threesome that comprised literacy – reading, writing and arithmetic.  Reading of course remains essential but it turns out books are not.  There are more efficient ways to share text today and the world is moving on.

 

The conversion to electronic text is reducing the number of books printed and seems to be having some negative effect on rare book collecting.  But overall, while books will occupy a less central role in the future their past primacy would seem to ensure their continuing collectability.   We are of course also dealing with the increasing visibility of printed copies on the major selling sites and today in many cases available copies swamp current interest - leading to thinner markets and falling prices, the sheer numbers now important factors in collectability.

 

The impact of electronic texts on collecting will be an open question for some time to come.  For serious collectors one can expect they will emerge, as they have for five centuries, to pursue subjects that appeal to them.  They were collecting in the 18th and 19th centuries and they will be collecting a thousand years into the future.  There are simply enough very smart people who see in the inner workings of the works on paper field opportunities to build collections based on personal perspectives.

 

Always present yes but collectors have also always been rare and every age has had a few paragons to illuminate collecting possibilities for the rest of us.  In the 19th century into the first quarter of the 20th century there were dozens.  In the 20th century dozens more, their ideas and goals evolving as the field became increasingly quantified.

 

For myself the world is and always has been in constant motion.  Books, by comparison, are stationary, their contents fixed, the differences between what was written and what we know or today surmise an understandable, definable difference that reflects on rate of change.  I am speaking of course about collections on a subject where a multitude of perspectives in aggregate create a consensus view.  Other collectors will have a different view that reflects their thinking.

 

A single collection is interesting, a group of collections almost scientific for comparison purposes.  Change is sometimes obvious and great discoveries, inventions, new theories and ideas all collected as first appearances.  But for many collectible concepts the subjects evolve slowly, often much more slowly than the world at large evolves.  In this case the transposition of regionally evolving ideas in comparison/contrast provide suggestions as to underlying sentiment.  I always found the local comparison to outside ideas useful to understanding the world I grew up in.  Facts and statements in isolation can be misleading, the comparison of local and broader perspectives illuminating.  That my parents, as newspaper publishers, lamented for decades this disconnect certainly heightened my awareness of this difference and materially authored my pursuit of evidence of change in local knowledge and opinion.  It is what I collect today. 

 

It turns out that serious book collectors have always been rare, most highly competent intellectually, and if I had to guess I would suggest that many share my skill set, the ability to see/feel the world of ideas in motion.   Such people are predisposed to collect for in their collection they see so much that most of the rest of the world simply misses.  It makes collecting exciting, not to mention intellectually gratifying.

 

And it suggests there will always be collecting.  Subjects and prices will vary but the collecting impulse, in the right circumstances will be the “A” game for many of the best minds.

 

 

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Jacques-Émile Ruhlmann, wallpaper sample book, circa 1919. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Archive from a late office of the Breuer & Smith architectural team, New York, 1960-70s. $3,500 to $5,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> William Morris, <i>The Story of the Glittering Plain or the Land of Living Men,</i> illustrated by Walter Crane, Kelmscott Press, Hammersmith, 1894. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Gustave Doré, <i>La Sainte Bible selon la Vulgate,</i> Tours, 1866. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Gustav Klimt & Max Eisler, <i>Eine Nachlese,</i> complete set, Vienna, 1931. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>Eric Allatini & Gerda Wegener, <i>Sur Talons Rouges,</i> with original watercolor by Wegener, Paris, 1929. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>C.P. Cavafy, <i>Fourteen Poems,</i> illustrated & signed by David Hockney, London, 1966. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b> Jean Midolle, <i>Spécimen des Écritures Modernes...</i>, Strasbourg, 1834-35. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Apr 26:</b><br>E.A. Seguy, <i>Floréal: Dessins & Coloris Nouveaux,</i> Paris, 1925. $3,000 to $4,000.
  • <b>Bonhams: Results from Fine Books and Manuscripts on March 9, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> BEETHOVEN, LUDWIG VAN. Autograph Manuscript sketch-leaf part of the score of the Scottish Songs, "Sunset" Op. 108 no 2. [Vienna, February 1818]. Inscribed by Alexander Wheelock Thayer. SOLD for $131,250
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> Violin belonging to Albert Einstein, presented to him by Oscar H. Steger, 1933. SOLD for $516,500
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. Autograph Letter Signed ("Papa") to his son Hans Albert, discussing his involvement with the atomic bomb, September 2, 1945. SOLD for $106,250
    <b>Bonhams: Results from Fine Books and Manuscripts on March 9, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> HAMILTON, ALEXANDER. Autograph Letter Signed, to Baron von Steuben, with extensive notes of Von Steuben's aide Benjamin Walker, June 12, 1780. SOLD for $16,250
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in Latin, being detailed instructions on making the philosopher's stone. 8 pp. 1790s. SOLD for $275,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> 1869 Inauguration Bible of President Ulysses S. Grant. SOLD for $118,750
  • <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> E.H. SHEPARD, Original drawing for A.A. Milne’s The House at Pooh Corner.<br>$40,000-60,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> BERNARD RATZER, Plan of the City of New York in North America, surveyed in the years 1766 & 1767. $80,000-100,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> THOMAS JEFFERSON, Autograph letter signed comparing Logan, Tecumseh, and Little Turtle to the Spartans. Monticello: 15 February 1821. $14,000-18,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN C. FREMONT, Narrative of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains, in the Year 1842.. Abridged edition, the only one containing the folding map From the Sporting Library of Arnold “Jake” Johnson. $3,000-5,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> ZANE GREY, Album containing 94 large format photographs of Grey and party at Catalina Island, Arizona, and fishing in the Pacific. From the Sporting Library of Arnold “Jake” Johnson. $5,000-$8,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> WILLIAM COMBE, A History of Madeira ... illustrative of the Costumes, Manners, and Occupations of the Inhabitants. produced by Ackermann in 1821; From the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> ERIC TAVERNER, Salmon Fishing... One of 275 copies signed by Taverner, published in 1931,From the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN WHITEHEAD, Exploration of Mount Kina Balu, North Borneo. Whitehead reached the high point of Kinabalu in 1888. Part of a major group of travel books from the Sporting Library of Jake Johnson. $2,000-$3,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> JOHN LONG, Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader, describing the Manners and Customs of the North American Indians... The first edition of 1791. $3,000-$5,000
    <b>Doyle, April 25:</b> SAMUEL BECKETT, Stirrings Still. This, Beckett’s last work of fiction with original lithographs by Le Brocquy, limited to 200 copies signed by the author and the artist. From the Estate of Howard Kaminsky.. $1,500-$2,500

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