• <b>Chiswick Auctions: Rare Books and Works on Paper, including Judaica. November 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Huttich (Johann) & Grynaeus (Simon). <i>Novus orbis regionum ac insularum veteribus …</i> FIRST EDITION, large woodcut folding map, text illustrations, folio, 1532. £8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Warhol (Andy) and Frankfurt (Suzie). <i>Wild Raspberries,</i> ONE OF FEWER THAN 100 COPIES, PRESENTATION COPY, inscribed by Warhol in pencil, 1959. £10,000 to 12,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Meulen (Adam Frans, van der). Collection of Hunting, Genre and Battle Scenes, 27 copper-engraved views, folio, Paris [c. 1685]. £8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Rare Books and Works on Paper, including Judaica. November 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Tyndale's Bible.- Bible, English. <i> [The Newe Testament yet once agayne Corrected by Willyam Tindale],</i> many woodcut text illustrations and initials, 1536. £8,000 to 10,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Jacobson (Ruth Taylor, artist). <i>Messiah's Feast,</i> original stained glass panel, image approx. 1020 x 615 mm., [c.1990]. £8,000 to 10,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Wallerstein-Braun (Gitl, sculptor-photographer). 'Jeremiah', original bronze of the Jewish prophet, approx. 210 x 470 (at base) mm., [c. 2010]. £6,000 to 8,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Rare Books and Works on Paper, including Judaica. November 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Kadishman (Menashe, artist). <i>Goats Head,</i> original acrylic on canvas painting, [Israel], 2002. £2,000 to 3,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Wyllie (W. L.) & Brewer (H. W.). <i>Bird's Eye View of London as seen from a balloon,</i> hand-coloured wood engraving, image 870 x 1100 mm., 1884. £1,800 to 2,200
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Stained glass window of Jewish interest.- Pilkington glass stained glass window from a demolished synagogue, approx. 580 x 1430 mm. [c.1950]. £1,500 to 2,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Rare Books and Works on Paper, including Judaica. November 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Auerbach (Tauba, artist). <i>[2,3],</i> #129 of 1000 copies, with card numbered and signed by the artist/author, 6 vol., one cut-out pop-up figure in each volume, different coloured boards. £1,500 to 2,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Costumes. <i>Costumi di Roma e dei Contorni,</i> engraved vignette title and 30 plates, Santarello, Rome, 1846; and 3 others (4). £1,000 to 1,500
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Nov 28:</b> Morris (William). <i>The Well at the World’s End,</i> one of 350 copies, The Kelmscott Press, 1896. £800 to 1,200
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Maria Louise Kirk, 4 pen, ink, watercolor & gouache illustrations for <i>Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,</i> 1904. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> H.A. Rey, <i>“Do You Want To Get Across?”</i> colored pencil, charcoal & watercolor, 1939. $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Norman Rockwell, <i>The Pharmacist,</i> study for cover of <i>The Saturday Evening Post,</i> 1939. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Sir William Russell Flint, illustration for Homer’s <i>Odyssey,</i> gouache & watercolor, 1914. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Ludwig Bemelmans, <i>“And everyone was in his bed,"</i> gouache, watercolor & ink on board, 1961. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Charles M. Shulz, <i>Woodstock is Searching for His Identity,</i> original pen & ink 4-panel <i>Peanuts</i> comic strip, 1972. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Eric Carle, <i>The Very Hungry Caterpillar,</i> painted collage, 1990. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Jerry Pinkney, <i>The Lion & The Mouse,</i> watercolor & graphite, illustration for <i>School Library Journal,</i> 2009. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Maurice Sendak, watercolor & graphite illustration for <i>Little Bear's New Friend,</i> 2001. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Peter Arno, <i>Circus Tricks,</i> ink, wash & watercolor, cover illustration for <i>The New Yorker,</i> 1964. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 6:</b> Garry Trudeau, Doonesbury: <i>“Is Rufus Ready for his Lesson?”,</i> watercolor, pen & ink, circa 1970s. $6,000 to $9,000.
  • <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on November 26th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>H. Schedel, <i>Buch der Chroniken,</i> 1493. Est: € 120,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b> Latin and Book of Hours, around 1500. Est: € 50,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b> Biblia latina, Koberger printing 1493. Est: € 4,000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on November 26th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>P. de Medina, <i>Libro de grandezas,</i> 1549. Est: € 6,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>C. J. Trew, <i>Plantae selectae,</i> 1750-73. Est: € 28,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>A. de Laborde, <i>Voyage pittoresque,</i> 1806-20. Est: € 8,000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on November 26th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>G. Klimt, <i>Eine Nachlese,</i> 1931.<br>Est: € 10,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>W. Kandinsky, <i>Klänge,</i> 1913.<br>Est: € 20,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>F. Léger, <i>Les illuminations,</i> 1949.<br>Est: € 2,000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on November 26th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b> Master binding by E. Maylander, 1945. Est: € 1,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b> Master binding by G. Cretté, 1934. Est: € 6,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 26:</b><br>S. Dalí, <i>Après 50 ans des surréalisme,</i> 1974. Est: € 8,000
  • <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. November 29, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Buffon (G.L.M.L., Comte de). <i>Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux,</i> 10 vol., large paper copy, 973 hand-coloured engraved plates drawn and engraved by Franz Nicolaus Martinet, Paris, 1770-86. £70,000 to 90,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Bible (English). The Holy Bible, first edition of the King James Bible, the Great 'He' Bible, [Robert Barker], 1611. £30,000 to 40,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Marlborough (John Churchill, 1st Duke of).- [Parker (Robert, army officer)] <i>[Memoirs of the remarkable military transactions from the year 1688 to 1718],</i> ?autograph manuscript, 300pp., [c. 1718]. £20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. November 29, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> France.- Paris.- Turgot (Michel Etienne). <i>Plan de Paris,</i> engraved maps, contemporary red morocco, gilt, Paris, 1739. £10,000 to 15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Mongolia.- Pallas (Peter Simon). <i>Sammlungen Historischer Nachrichten uber die Mongolischen Volkerschaften,</i> first edition, complete with 31 plates, St. Petersburg, 1776-1801. £10,000 to 15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Brant (Sebastian). <i>Stultifera Navis... The Ship of Fooles, wherein is shewed the folly of all States...,</i> large woodcut title and numerous woodcuts in the text, [London], [John Cawood], 1570. £8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. November 29, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Aldus.- Boccaccio (Giovanni). <i>Il Decamerone,</i> Venice, House of Aldus & Andrea Torresani, 1522. £8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Wallace (Alfred Russel). 77pp. of Autograph letters (and 1 postcard) to various people, 1894-1904, on various palaeontological, geological and natural history matters. £8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> DNA.- Watson (James D.) and Francis Crick, <i>Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid,</i> 1953 [and others]. £5,000 to 7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. November 29, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Optics.- Molyneux (William). <i>Dioptrica nova. A Treatise of Dioptricks, in Two Parts,</i> first edition, for Benj. Tooke, 1692. £5,000 to 7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Economics.- Mississippi & South Sea Bubbles.- <i>Het Groote Tafereel der Dwaasheid,</i> 74 engraved plates and 3 maps, Amsterdam, 1720. £4,000 to 6,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 29:</b> Asia.- Clouet (Jean Baptiste Louis). <i>Carte D'Asie Divisée en ses Principaux Etats,</i> engraved map with hand-colouring, on wooden rollers, 1782. £3,000 to 5,000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - July - 2015 Issue

Commodore and the Patagonians - The Tallest Lie

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The mythical Patagonian Giants.

In 1767, a peculiar book entitled Voyage Autour du Monde fait en 1764 & 1765 (Paris, 1767) reached the shores of France. This first edition of Commodore Byron’s voyage around the world shut the mouths of all the furious disciples of reason, who had so far denied the existence of a race of giants living in Patagonia, South America. At last! Here was the irrefutable proof, printed black on white, coming straight—or almost—from the mouth of the Commodore. But—wait! A race of giants—WTF?! as the young gentlemen of today would say.

 

 

The English edition of Byron’s travel came out in 1767 (London) and made it clear from its title page: “Contains (...) a minute and exact description of the Streights (sic) of Magellan, and of the Gigantic People called PATAGONIAS.” Nothing but the truth was to be expected from such a piece of work, which was to “remove the doubts (...) concerning some matters which have lately occasioned much altercation.” The French editor went straight to the point in his own preface: “The existence of a race of giants on the coast of Patagonia is no more dubious today; it’s even surprising it’s been a subject of controversy for so long.” He blamed the “so-called philosophers who dared not siding the opinion of the commoners,” before rejoicing that “the expedition of Commodore Byron has just set the records straight once and for all; and the exact and authentic reports of the crews of both vessels leave no room for pyrrhonism (or scepticism).” The English edition featured two engravings of the giants, but the French one reproduced the frontispiece only. It shows an English sailor handing a biscuit to a female Patagonian, who is twice as tall as him. Yet so touchy about the truth, the French publisher had the scene loosely redrawn—the Patagonians appear more handsome than on the original. Surprisingly, he didn’t pick up the second engraving that represents Byron himself, making presents to a bunch of gigantic Patagonians quietly sitting around him in a circle—they were gentle giants. The other notable difference with the English edition is the lengthy preface that retraces the various voyages to the Straight of Magellan linked to the myth of the giants of Patagonia—we only find a four-page index at the end of the English edition. Of course, it starts with the most legendary of all, Magellan’s.

 

Anatomy of A Lie

 

The reason why the particular relation of Byron’s travel, after so many contradictory ones, was supposed to settle the matter was that John Byron was a respected explorer, whose voyage couldn’t be any fresher. He had first sailed to the Straight of Magellan in 1742 alongside the famous George Anson, whose circumnavigation remains one of the most important travels of the 18th century. Byron’s ship, HMS Wager, had been shipwrecked on that occasion, and the navigator had remained there for several months before being taken prisoner by the Spaniards—he later published a relation of this travel. He had also served his country during the Seven Years’ War against France. In a word, he was no punk trying to make an impression. And if you couldn’t trust an English officer, then who could you trust?

 

In 1519, Ferdinand Magellan discovered the straight that still bears his name today during the first circumnavigation of all times. Unfortunately, the first man to circumnavigate the globe ever didn’t really circumnavigate the globe—he died halfway. Thus, when Pigafetta, one of the few survivors of the expedition, wrote the relation of this history-making travel, Magellan wasn’t there to confirm or to infirm a story “mingled with (...) circumstances that are equally fabulous and absurd, and that are only calculated to disguise truth in the habit of fiction,” read the index of the English edition. The crew, said Pigafetta, had been anchored for two months at Port San Julian (today’s Patagonia) when suddenly “a giant came to us, singing, dancing, and throwing dust over his head.” Since his feet were stuck into an animal fur, Magellan decided to call him Patagonpatagon meaning feet in Spanish; in fact, the name probably derives from Patagon, the giant character of Primalion, a chivalric novel of the time. According to Pigafetta, the taller Spaniards among the crew hardly reached the waist of the Patagonian! The complacent Abbot Feller, in his Dictionnaire Historique (Liège, 1790), offered an explanation: Magellan had met some Indians “probably taller than Negroes”; but he hadn’t examined them closely enough. Well, if we believe Pigafetta, he had! The author said they met dozens of giants, even capturing two of them with the intention to bring them back home—too bad they died on board shortly afterwards! Pigafetta’s relation, published in 1524, reminded the Europeans of the famous giants of Ovid’s Metamorphosis, who had rebelled against Jupiter. Had these warlike creatures sought refuge to Patagonia once scattered? Why not? The discovery of a new world was such a miracle that people were probably ready to accept anything.

 

The French editor of Byron’s travel reproduced a part of Pigafetta’s relation, but honestly concluded: “It was then natural to be suspicious.” Then, he added: “But the many relations that have followed should have convinced every one long ago; including the philosophers.” He then mentioned navigators like Argensola, Nuno de Silva, Sarmiento, who all claimed they had seen some giants—and even Thomas Cavendish and Admiral Van Noort, whose testimonies appeared more irrefutable. He quoted Sir Francis Drake’s relation, who “reported that the English saw, on the Coast of Magellan, some savages compared to whom the tallest Englishmen were very short.” What about Cordes and Wer who said that, when under attack, these giants uprooted some trees with their bare hands to protect themselves! Admiral Spilberg, Garcie de Nodal or Mr. Frezier (quoting a witness) also testified of the existence of giants on the coast of Patagonia. This had become a very fashionable topic in Europe, much as the southern continent—which non-existence was later proved by James Cook, or the Northwest Passage. A Jesuit Spaniard named Don Francisco Torrubia even wrote a full book to demonstrate the existence of giants, De la Giganthologie, quoting the alleged testimony of Marie-Madeleine de Viqueza, a Spanish woman, who had lived six years among the Patagonians following a series of incredible tribulations. “She told Torrubia that they could be ten or twelve feet tall,” reported L’Année Littéraire (Amsterdam, 1767). That was a good try, but some serious scientists still doubted the existence of giants, including the mighty Hans Sloane in England (see article). Thus the voice of Lord Byron, though he hadn’t written this relation himself—his personal relation was later published as part of James Cook’s first voyage (see below)—resounded like a shout of triumph for those who had believed in giants since they were kids.

 

Remarkable, excellent and generous Byron

 

Lord Byron—he is the famous writer’s grandfather—represented the “avant-garde” of the enlightened navigators of the 18th century, today embodied by James Cook. As a matter of fact, he was careful not to ruin the health of his crew, and the author of the relation wrote: “We, fortunately for ourselves, but, perhaps, unfortunately for the reader, met with no considerable distress (...), and lost but twelve men out of both ships.” This unusually low figure for the time “may, in a great measure, be attributed to the humanity, prudence, generosity and courage of our Commodore, to whose merit,” etc, etc, etc. Oh, yes—this is a fawning book. For instance, when the English met the giants of Patagonia, “our Commodore, who was equally remarkable for his prudence and his bravery”, (...) “with great intrepidity leaped on the shore” in front of 200 gigantic savages, whom he soon subdued with calm and serenity, “making the Indians sit down on the ground.” And were they tall! “In this situation, they were almost as high as the Commodore when standing.” They rode small horses, which appear, as a consequence, “in a poor condition.” The Patagonians manifested their gratitude with such excitement that “the Commodore could scarcely restrain them from caressing him, particularly the women.” The English didn’t remain too long with their tall friends, whose number increased rapidly. They thought it wiser to sail away. The voyage resumed and they thereafter met none but Indians “of the middle size.”

 

With this voyage, Byron became the first navigator to circumnavigate the globe in less than two years’ time; nevertheless, his meeting with the giants of Patagonia was the heart of the matter. But who wrote this book, anyway? A man, claimed the publisher, whose “veracity (...) requires no aid among those who have the pleasure of his acquaintance.” Unfortunately, “his name could not with propriety have been prefixed to the title of this volume.” It has since been attributed to the navigator Philip Carteret (1733-1796), who circumnavigated the world a next time in 1766 with Samuel Wallis. The English editor, understanding the importance of the passage about the giants, gave another account of the encounter, which he attributed to “an officer in one of the ships, and on shore at the same time with our author.” This new unsung hero—curiously, even the name of the French translator was withheld at the time—wrote: “The Commodore himself measures full six feet, and though he stood on tip-toe, he could just reach the crown of one of the Indians heads, who was not, by far, the tallest among them.” Another anonymous witness also gave the publisher a version of this meeting, depicting ten-feet tall giants! For some reason, these additional footnotes were removed from the French edition.

 

What’s so exciting about holding this book today is that it was deeply rooted in its time. For instance, the French publisher hurriedly added a small text at the back of the title page: “Since the publishing of this book, we’ve learnt that the newly discovered island mentioned page 131 is called Falkland Island.” The crew of the Dolphin and the Tamer—the names of the ships of the expeditionclimbed the highest mountain of the island, where “the Union Jack was erected on a high staff.” Then, “the Commodore named the whole his Majesty’s isles, which he claimed for the crown of Great Britain.” Byron wasn’t responsible for discovering but for naming them. The true aim of his voyage was jealously kept secret even to the men on-board, who only discovered their final destination once in Brazil. It seems that the idea was to reconnoitre the Ladrone Islands—today’s Mariana Islands. Indeed, the narrator of the relation wrote: “We sailed from Tinian, and the rest of the Ladrone Islands (...) for (..) we had finished the business on which we were sent, by the discovery of those islands in the South Seas, according to our original destination.” Another funny thing about this book is the presence of many gaps in the text. Indeed, when referring to certain newfound islands in the South Seas, the narrator didn’t disclose their latitude and longitude. “As the precise knowledge of the situation of these new discovered island can be of service only to the navigator, we have, in obedience to the government, and that the enemies of our country may not avail themselves of our discoveries, omitted the degrees of latitude and longitude.” All the “gentlemen” who had purchased the book were invited to later fill in the gaps “with a pen.” As far as women were concerned, well—let’s be serious: crucial topics such as latitudes and giants were no business for women.

 

There’s a race of men

 

In 1773, Byron’s relation resurfaced as a first-person account in John Hawkesworth’s An Account of the Voyages Undertaken by the Order of His Present Majesty for Making Discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere and Successively Performed by Commodore Byron, Captain Wallis, Captain Carteret, and Captain Cook (London, 1773)—it came out one year later in France. Byron supposedly wrote it himself, confirming his meeting some giants: “One of them (...) came towards me: he was of a gigantic stature, and seemed to realise the tales of monsters in a human shape. Then he added: “We can say of the Patagons that they are giants rather than men.” This book did outrage the German historian De Paw: “Commodore Byron, in order to please the English Ministry, declared himself the author of a tale that no sailor on his board would have dared signing (...). This Gargantua tale was published in London in 1766. Dr. Mati, famous for his short size as well as for his British Journal, hasted to accredit it and to spread it around. Here is what he wrote to Mr. de la Lande: "The existence of giants is thus confirmed.” The reason why the English Admiralty decided to lie about a gigantic race of men in Patagonia remains quite obscure. Duncan S. Campbell and Gladys Grace P., in their interesting work about the giants of Patagonia (patlibros.org/frm/index.php?fun=myth), wrote: “So, why the continued tendency to exaggeration? Perhaps it was a combination of psychological factors—clothing, preconceptions, superstition and fear—compounded by the lower height of Europeans in earlier centuries." In a word, we have no idea.

 

In 1766, another reasonable navigator reached Patagonia: Louis de Bougainville. “The only gigantic thing about them,” reported the French—and, as such, much more reliable navigator who physically met them, “is their huge build, the size of their heads and the thickness of their limbs.” As a true gentleman, Bougainville didn’t question Byron’s relation, but noticed that the Patagonians were using small iron knives: “They probably obtained them from Mr. Byron.” Did it mean that these were the Patagonians Byron had described—and that they were no giants? Well, the knives could have circulated among the inhabitants of the region, couldn’t they? The famous French naturalist Georges-Louis Leclerc de Buffon suggested that Bougainville might have met a different group of Patagonians; that, maybe, the giant ones were living inland. But Commerson, Bougainville’s right-hand, was upset and in no complacent mood: “I saw them too, these Patagonians! I stood in the middle of a hundred of them besides Mr Bougainville (...). I can assure (...) that the Patagonians are just a little bit taller than we are—and nothing more.”

 

Yet, Byron’s word was a strong one—why should he lie? Thus, many agreed with what Mr. Boss had written in Histoire des Navigations aux Terres Australes in 1756: none of these testimonies were wrong. The fact some navigators hadn’t seen what others had didn’t prove that the giants were a forgery. According to Mr. Boss, these gigantic Indians, scared by the frequent passages of the Europeans, had sought refuge into the mountains—voilà! Buffon, whose authority was irrefutable, warned his contemporaries about exaggerations. “Yet,” he added, “I’m inclined to think with Mr. de Bosse that the difference of size given by the various navigators to the Patagonians comes from the fact that they haven’t met the same men (...) there is a race of men taller and more powerful than the rest of men.” Amen.

 

Time alone put an end to this controversy, and we know today that the only gigantic thing Commodore Byron brought from Patagonia was a lie.

 

(c) Thibault Ehrengardt

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Sotheby’s Paris: Livres et Manuscrits. November 21, 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Nov, 21:</b> ANDRÉ BRETON, <i>La Lampe dans l’horloge.</i> Paris, Robert Marin, 1948. Binding by Rose Adler, dated 1959. €15,000 to €20,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Nov, 21:</b> ARTHUR RIMBAUD, <i>Une Saison en enfer.</i> Bruxelles, Alliance typographique, 1873. Binding by Rose Adler. €25,000 to €35,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Nov, 21:</b> TRISTAN TZARA, <i>La Bonne heure.</i> Paris, Raymond Jacquet 1955. Binding by Rose Adler, dated 1958. €8,000 to €12,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris: Livres et Manuscrits. November 21, 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Nov, 21:</b> PIERRE REVERDY, <i>La Lucarne ovale.</i> Paris, 1916. Binding by Rose Adler, dated 1949. €20,000 to €30,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Nov, 21:</b> RENÉ CHAR, PABLO PICASSO, <i>Le Marteau sans maître and Moulin Premier.</i> 1927-1935. Paris, José Corti, 1945. Binding by Rose Adler, dated 1947. €20,000 to €30,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Nov, 21:</b> MARCEL PROUST, Friendly correspondence to the count Louis Gautier-Vignal. 1914-1921. €20,000 to €30,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris: Livres et Manuscrits. November 21, 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Nov, 21:</b> JEAN COCTEAU, Portrait of the Baron de Charlus, circa 1921-1923. Original drawing signed. €7,000 to €10,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Nov, 21:</b> PAUL ÉLUARD, JOAN MIRÓ, <i>À toute épreuve.</i> Genève, Gérald Cramer, 1958. First illustrated edition. €15,000 to €25,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Nov, 21:</b> PAUL VERLAINE, PIERRE BONNARD, <i>Parallèlement.</i> Paris, Imprimerie nationale, Ambroise Vollard, 1900. €15,000 to €25,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Nov, 21:</b> GUILLAUME APOLLINAIRE, ANDRÉ DERAIN, <i>L’Enchanteur pourrissant.</i> Paris, Henry Kahnweiler, 1909. €30,000 to €50,000
  • <b>Christie’s Paris, Nov 20:</b> GAZA, Theodorus. <i>Introductivae grammatices libriquatuor.</i> Venice: Aldus Manutius, 25 December 1495. €40,000 to 50,000
    <b>Christie’s Paris, Nov 20:</b> MACHIAVELLI, Niccolo. <i>Historie di Nicolo Machiavegli cittadino, et segretario fiorentino</i>... Rome: Antonio Blado, 25 March 1532. €15,000 to 20,000
    <b>Christie’s Paris, Nov 20:</b> BELLMER, Hans -- ELUARD, Paul. <i>Les Jeux de la Poupée. Illustrés de textes par Paul Eluard.</i> Paris : les Editions Premieres, 1949. €30,000 to 40,000
    <b>Christie’s Paris, Nov 20:</b> [BONNARD, Pierre] - VERLAINE, Paul. <i>Parallèlement.</i> Paris : Imprimerie nationale & Ambroise Vollard, 1900. €30,000 to 40,000
  • <b>Bonhams New York: Fine Books and Manuscripts Including the World of Hilary Knight. December 5, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> KNIGHT, HILARY. The Original Portrait of Eloise that Hung at the Plaza Hotel. $100,000 to 150,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> WARHOL, ANDY. "Iced Lemon Delight," an Original Watercolor Presented to Hilary Knight's cat, Phoebe $8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> SENDAK, MAURICE. <i>Where the Wild Things Are.</i> PRESENTATION COPY, INSCRIBED with drawing to Hilary Knight in the month following publication. $10,000 to 15,000
    <b>Bonhams New York: Fine Books and Manuscripts Including the World of Hilary Knight. December 5, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> NOLAND, KENNETH. Original circle painting, untitled, acrylic and ink on cloth, for cover of monograph $8,000 to 12,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> TOULOUSE-LAUTREC. <i>Histoires Naturelles,</i> 1899. With 22 original lithographs. $10,000 to 15,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>A Collection of Poems,</i> [1711]. The first authoritative and complete collected Sonnets.$15,000 to 20,000
    <b>Bonhams New York: Fine Books and Manuscripts Including the World of Hilary Knight. December 5, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> LONDON, JACK. <i>The Call of the Wild.</i> 1903. First edition, first state jacket. $2,000 to 3,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> FROST, ROBERT. Autograph Manuscript of "Build Soil," 12 pp, 1932-1936. $15,000 to 20,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> GOULD, GLENN. Glenn Gould's extensively annotated copy of Bach's Goldberg Variations $100,000 to 150,000
    <b>Bonhams New York: Fine Books and Manuscripts Including the World of Hilary Knight. December 5, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> PLATH, SYLVIA. EARLY Autograph Letter Signed, about her beginnings as a writer, Northampton, MA, 1951. $7,000 to 10,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> HOUDINI, HARRY. A collection of 11 cast iron shackle and lock items from Houdini's personal collection. $20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Bonhams, Dec 5:</b> M4 ENGIMA MACHINE, with very rare RARE HYDRA KEY ENVELOPE. $400,000 to 600,000
  • <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>The first edition, in the original wrappers, of the first part of Pushkin’s masterpiece – ‘a bibliographical rarity of the highest order’ (Smirnov-Sokol’skii). £25,000 to £35,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>The very rare first edition of Gogol’s first masterpiece and his first obtainable book. £50,000 to £70,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>The first edition of Dostoevsky's <i>Brat'ia Karamazovy</i> (1830) in a superb contemporary cloth presentation binding. £22,000 to £30,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>The first edition of the first version of the opening of <i>War and Peace,</i> with the original paper covers. £15,000 to £20,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>An early corrected typescript of Akhmatova's <i>Poema bez geroia</i> (July 1946) £20,000 to £30,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>A presentation copy of the first edition of <i>Kamen</i> (1913) inscribed by Mandel'shtam to his early mentor the poet Viacheslav Ivanov. £60,000 to £90,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>Rare autograph correspondence from Vladislav Khodasevich, including a manuscript of his long poem 'Sorrento Photographs' (1921). £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Christie’s London, 28 November:</b><br>An important letter from Marina Tsvetaeva to the poet Nikolai Tikhonov (1935) in which she challenges Pasternak and his views on poetry. £12,000 to £18,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>

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