• <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>
  • <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. May 31, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, May 31:</b> Simcoe (John Graves). Plan of the Province of Upper Canada with part of the Adjacent Countries, manuscript map… with numerous contemporary annotations. £6,000 to £8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, May 31:</b> Ramusio (Giovanni Battista). <i>Delle Navigationi et Viaggi,</i> 3 vol., mixed edition, 3 double-page engraved maps and 7 folding woodcut maps, Venice, Giunti, 1613. £6,000 to £8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, May 31:</b> Dickens (Charles). <i>A Christmas Carol,</i> first edition, first issue, Chapman & Hall, 1843. £6,000 to £8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. May 31, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, May 31:</b> Book of Hours. Hours of the Virgin [Use of Rome] in Latin, miniature illuminated manuscript on vellum with 6 full-page miniatures and 6 large initials with borders, Flanders, [2nd quarter of 15th century]. £6,000 to £8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, May 31:</b> G.K. Chesterton archive. Collection of poems, drawings, letters and cards sent to Enid Simon, 1920s. £6,000 to £8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, May 31:</b> Pasternak (Boris). <i>Doktor Zhivago</i> original typescript, 2 vol., with manuscript corrections and insertions by the author, the George Katkov copy, c.1956. £100,000 to £150,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works on Paper. May 31, 2018</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, May 31:</b> Tolkien (J.R.R.). <i>The Hobbit,</i> first edition, first impression, 1937. £20,000 to £30,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, May 31:</b> Milton (John). <i>Paradise Lost & Paradise Regain'd,</i> 2 vol., one of 10 copies printed on vellum, Cresset Press, 1931. £8,000 to £12,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, May 31:</b> Electricity and the vacuum.- Guericke (Otto von). <i>Experimenta nova (ut vocantur) Magdeburgica de Vacuo Spatio,</i> first edition; bound with <i>Philosophia Universa de Microcosmo</i>. £12,000 to £16,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, May 31:</b> [The Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia, Egypt & Nubia ...], vignette title and 42 plates from the deluxe subscriber's edition, 1842-1849 (43). £7,000 to £10,000
  • <b>Chiswick Auctions: Modern First Editions, Illustrated Books & Limited Editions. May 30, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Hammett (Dashiell). <i>The Maltese Falcon,</i> FIRST EDITION. A very good copy of this most influential detective fiction novel. £8,000 to £12,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Hemingway (Ernest). <i>In Our Time,</i> FIRST EDITION, NUMBER 137 OF 170 COPIES on Rives handmade paper. £15,000 to £18,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Hemingway (Ernest). <i>A Farewell to Arms,</i> FIRST EDITION, inscribed by the author to Mike Murphy, a Hemingway biographer and scholar. £4,000 to £6,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Modern First Editions, Illustrated Books & Limited Editions. May 30, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Kerouac (Jack). <i>On the Road,</i> FIRST EDITION, New York, Viking, 1957. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Ransome (Arthur). <i>Swallows and Amazons,</i> FIRST EDITION, ownership inscription to half title. Only 2,000 copies of the first edition printed. £3,000 to £4,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Sewell (Anna). <i>Black Beauty: His Grooms and Companions. The Autobiography of a Horse. Translated from the original Equine,</i> FIRST EDITION, engraved frontispiece. £3,000 to £4,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Modern First Editions, Illustrated Books & Limited Editions. May 30, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Capa (Robert). <i>Omaha Beach D-Day, June 6th, 1944,</i> gelatine silver print, printed under the direct supervision of Cornell Capa, 40 x 50.5 cm. £3,000 to £5,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Cartier-Bresson (Henri). 'Loudres – Pilgrims Assemble', silver print, stamps and annotations on verso, very slight scratch, 170 x 240 mm, 1950. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Carroll, Lewis [Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge]. <i>The Nursery Alice,</i> FIRST EDITION, a very rare inscribed, dedication copy. £8,000 to £10,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Modern First Editions, Illustrated Books & Limited Editions. May 30, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Potter (Beatrix). <i>The Tale of Peter Rabbit,</i> FIRST EDITION, FIRST PRINTING, limited to 250 copies [with] the FIRST PUBLISHED EDITION. £12,000 to £15,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Wells (H. G.). <i>War of the Worlds,</i> original Danish manuscript, the text written out in block script ink, with over 620 original drawings in ink and watercolour. £1,800 to £2,200
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, May 30:</b> Toulouse-Lautrec (Henri de).- Clemenceau (Georges). <i>Au Pied de Sinai,</i> NUMBER 104 OF 355 COPIES, with the suite of 10 lithographs by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec in 2 states. £1,500 to £2,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Charles Addams, <i>Penguin Convention,</i> watercolor, cover for <i>The New Yorker,</i> 1977. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Ludwig Bemelmans, <i>Agreed! No whiskey anywhere is more deluxe than Walker's DeLuxe,</i> pen, ink & watercolor, 1957. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Charles Schulz, <i>Do you like Beethoven?,</i> pen & ink, 9-panel <i>Peanuts</i> comic, 1970. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Russell Tandy, <i>The Secret in the Old Attic,</i> watercolor & gouache, cover for <i>Nancy Drew,</i> 1944. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Arthur Rackham, <i>Danaë & the Infant Perseus,</i> watercolor, ink & wash, for Hawthorne's <i>A Wonder Book,</i> 1922. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Tom Lovell, <i>I believe in magic too,</i> oil on canvas, published in <i>Woman's Home Companion,</i> 1947. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Enoch Bolles, <i>With Love...,</i> watercolor & gouache, cover for <i>Wow!</i> magazine, 1931. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b><br>Rick Meyerowitz & Maira Kalman, <i>New Yorkistan,</i> pen, ink & watercolor sketch for a <i>New Yorker cover,</i> 2001. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Jessie Willcox Smith, <i>Touching,</i> watercolor for <i>The Five Senses</i> by Angela M. Keyes, 1911. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Edward Gorey, <i>ABA 75,</i> watercolor & ink, cover for <i>Publisher's Weekly,</i> 1975. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Aubrey Beardsley, <i>Shelter,</i> pen & ink, for <i>Bon-Mots,</i> 1892. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 5:</b> Tedd Arnold, <i>I think it was three days ago...,</i> colored pencil & watercolor, for <i>Parts,</i> 1996. $4,000 to $6,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - May - 2015 Issue

An Interview with Ed Maggs of Maggs Bros. Ltd. - London

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Ed Maggs, latest family member to head firm, and the front entrance to Maggs Bros.

Maggs Bros. Ltd is one of the oldest continuously operating dealers in rare books and manuscripts in the English speaking world. It also has the distinction of holding a Royal Warrant as purveyor of books to the Queen of England and her family. Established in 1853 by Uriah Maggs, it is presently headed by Ed Maggs, 57, who graciously consented to an interview about himself, his firm and staff  in the current scheme of things.

 

The Q&A was conducted via email between Hawaii and the UK at the end of April 2015

 

The philosophy of Maggs is summed up nicely by this quote on “Building a Library” from the company’s web site:

 

Above all, buy with your heart. Buy what you understand, what you love, what moves you, not what established taste dictates. This is not to decry connoisseurship, scholarship, and the wisdom of the wise, but equally do not be uncritical.”

 

Q Your company has an illustrious history. What parts of it are your favorites?

 

A. What has posterity ever done for us, that's what I want to know? A distinguished history is a wonderful thing, but it can be a knife with no handle, especially if you are seduced by it into thinking that you have some sort of special right to success: the vanity of the old established firm, and consequent smugness is a terrifying vision to me. When people describe Maggs as an "institution" I remind them what sort of people live in institutions ...

 

But the past has a way of living in the present, and good things continue to return to you. When I was embarking on dealing, one of my first really exciting and valuable transactions was selling Edith Wharton's Hyères library, as a result of an introduction from Jake Zeitlin, the Los Angeles dealer, as a formal thank you for my grandfather having lent him stock in the 1930s when he was embarking on his career.

 

The historical transaction that we still get asked about most is the sale of the Codex Sinaiticus in 1933. Although it seems wrong to invest the story of such a pre-eminent artefact with dealer-talk, it remains (with the Robinson's purchase of the Phillips manuscripts) the most complete bookselling fantasy. In 1931 Ernest Maggs and Maurice Ettinghausen were negotiating with the Soviet Government to buy a Gutenberg Bible (now the Bodmer copy) and almost casually observed that the Codex - one of the most important biblical manuscripts in the world - would be worth even more. A long and difficult negotiation led to the purchase of the Codex by the British Museum Library, in a storm of publicity with money donated to a public appeal by cooks and Counts, boy-scouts and country vicars.

 

Q I gather from reading the clips that being a book seller was not your first choice of occupation. How did you come to join the firm, how did you learn to be one of the leading dealers in the world and do you regret that you did not become a reggae disk  jockey you once hoped to be?  Who were the people who you learned from, admired, influenced you?

 

A. Well, as you say I made a rather doomed attempt to modify my genes. My time on the fringes of the musical world came to an end when I tried to sack the band's singer while not taking into account that we were still sharing a flat: I've never been blessed with good judgment, but this was the only time it's led to death threats.

 

DJing was always the fallback position (it's not the hardest thing in the world): I no longer regret not being the bass guitarist of my generation, but I would give anything to stand below the window of my beloved's apartment and sing, unaccompanied, the aria "Vedi l'ape ch'ingegnosa" from Handel's Berenice. One changes.

 

At a loose end, I started doing casual jobs in the firm, and got drawn in. I was lucky enough to be apprenticed to Bill Lent, a legendarily curmudgeonly old bookseller, and ended up taking over the modern department from him. My father John Maggs dealt with travel books, and it would be a regret that I didn't go into that field were it not for the fact that Hugh Bett has done it so tremendously well for the last twenty five years.

 

Dad and I got on very well at the firm, but wouldn't necessarily have done so had we been working in the same speciality. As to learning the trade, I'm very much looking forward to it! Early on I was lucky enough to be pointed at the writings of Michael Sadleir, Colin Franklin and John Carter and they still remain my “what’s it all about” sources.

 

There was a certain amount of taking under the arm from old-timers such as Douglas Cleverdon and Jake Zeitlin; the extraordinarily knowledgeable John Collins worked at Maggs for many years and taught me a lot; Bill Reese and Terry Halladay have been friends for many years, and I still frequently turn to them for advice; outside the trade, I try not to abuse my friendships (in other words, I research their published writings before phoning them - nothing annoys an expert more) with the T.E. Lawrence expert Jeremy Wilson, and the great Yeatsians Warwick Gould and Deirdre Toomey.

 

Arnold Hunt is another whose encyclopaedic knowledge of both book and book-trade history I often lean on, as is that of Michael Meredith and his erstwhile Eton colleague Paul Quarrie. Colleagues who I remain in awe of for the depths of their knowledge include Robert Harding and the brilliant if irascible (Ha! that'll get his steam up) Glenn Mitchell, who used to work at Maggs - it is in fact invidious to mention any of my current colleagues, for they are all amazingly knowledgeable both inside and outside their fields.

 

Q. Is there a next generation of Maggs family coming up from the ranks? Children, relatives, family of workers?  Who looks promising?  

 

A. The firm has a really talented group of youngsters involved now - I think six people aged 30 and under. It's very exciting to see the enthusiasm that the "born-digital" generation has for real stuff - the fact that the book is a less quotidian part of their life gives them a very sharp appreciation of the unique qualities of original historical material. The appetite for the analogue among youngsters is very real. It's not a binary choice between digital and actual: you need both.

 

The stories of how we came to hire two of them are interesting, because they show how important basic enthusiasm is:

 

Chris Stork - the most senior of the young group and an associate director of the firm already - came from the CV pile: we get a lot of applications out of the blue, all of whom declare a passionate interest in rare books (sometimes even a passionate interest in the "Rare Book Industry") but who show no evidence of it in their CVs. Chris, on the other hand had done a Masters with a dissertation on a to-me obscure 17th Century English book collector -  I remember thinking, "Oh, hang on, this one means it!"

 

Alice Rowell came through an introduction at a time when I had an interesting but particularly challenging archive to be dealt with. She told me of her dissertation at the Courtauld on the interesting Victorian painter and illustrator Joseph Noel Paton, a subject she chose because it would mean working in Scotland, away from her supervisor who was forever at her to turn up the semiotics knob. She explained that she just wanted to tell the actual stories from actual material, and not be obliged to try and bend history into contemporary theory: it was a very short interview - if she had been coached on how to appeal to my prejudices she couldn't have done better.

 

My son Ben, now in his mid to late twenties, is one of that small pack, and is beginning to specialise in private presses, book illustration and hopefully modern fine bindings - what you might call the book as artefact. He's also doing an MA in the History of the Book at the University of London's Institute of English Studies. It's an excellent course - he's doing his dissertation on the fascinating comparison between the Private Press movement as a reaction to the coarseness of the products of the Industrial Revolution, and the contemporary art book and ‘zine culture as a reaction against the transience of today's digital culture.

 

I'd always thought he'd be a good bookseller - he's got a wide range of interests and a basic belief in the importance of artefact over idea, or artefact as evidence of idea. His first subject at university was archeology, and he speaks with relief of the pleasure of dealing with material where there is more knowledge than conjecture.

 

Q. Is there a future for bookselling in the digital age?  Have your ideas about bookselling changed since the advent of the Internet?

 

A. What's to be said about bookselling in the age of electricity that hasn't already been said? I think we all understand the mechanism whereby the best and the rest have become more polarised, as part of the disruption both of the product and of the market. Bookselling has become harder over recent years, but in some ways better.

 

Books don't automatically sell themselves in the way they used to, and everything is hand-sold. Equally, collectors tend not to buy everything on a subject any more, and only want things with particular meaning, and there's nothing not to like about that: it's a long time since I've seen a wants list which principally cites numbers in a bibliography.

 

I've always said that the netweb as a selling tool would only be an extra arm, to be added to the traditional premises/catalogue/fair model, and I think it's being proved that the integration of the internet into our whole lives means that it's actually hard to identify a particular transaction as an "internet sale" or a "shop sale". They all support each other. It's annoying how expensive digital marketing is - at one stage it was mooted to be a cheap place to do business, but not so much now.

 

Q. What does it take financially to keep the doors open at a company like Maggs, millions, tens of millions, more?

 

A. Ah, you're verging on the nosy there. Quite a lot, and it's dispiriting sometimes to realise how many books you have to sell a month before you show a profit. It's tempting to do a big shrink, move away from prime real estate and beat up on the overhead in other ways. We might make more in the short term, but we would be diminishing our goodwill, eating our seed corn, living on capital. I'm very proud that of our 20 odd staff, only three and a half aren't directly involved in bookselling - we have a good and slim management/administration structure.

 

Q. Is the story about Napoleon’s penis true?  Did Maggs really sell it?

 

A. Ah, the Emperor's Willy! Yes, it's true I'm afraid. It was part of a big Napoleonic collection we handled between the wars. The "tendon" was malign and had been amputated pre-mortem and had been kept by his doctor, as a rather grisly souvenir.

 

Q. What is your own taste now?  What are your favorite parts of the business? Least favorite parts?

 

A. As Tigger might have said, "Archives is what I like best." The chance of finding and telling stories that no one else has - of seeing things for the first time - is very seductive. I feel like Howard Carter sometimes, seeing wonderful things for the first time.

 

Cataloguing them is profoundly satisfying, if time consuming. Ours is a fairly social trade, and I'm lucky enough to be surrounded by amiable and brilliant customers and colleagues - both within and outwith the firm.

 

Admin, accounts and I.T. nightmares is what I least like, though they all have their attractions, especially when things go well. I don't like having to tell people off, and am famously bad at it.

 

Q. It’s pretty impressive to be the bookseller to the Queen. How does that happen?  Could you explain what a royal warrant is?

 

A. The Royal Warrants - they exist for the Queen and the Prince of Wales - are granted to firms who work for the Royal Households. Windsor has of course a tremendous library and archive, and we're rather proud that the current librarian Oliver Urquhart-Irvine is an ex-Maggs employee. It saves a lot of money on having to hire graphics designers to make a logo - the crest looks quite smart on one's letterhead!

 

Q.  What are some of the high points of the last few years?  Any regrets? Collections that got away? Sales that went sour, economies that tanked?  How did you survive the recession?

 

A. It's very boring, but we really don't brag about what we've done. The difference between the bookseller and the auctioneer is that whereas they rely on trumpeting, we rely on discretion. Speaking generally, we help build libraries, help disperse them, place important individual items, advise, and of course trade on our own behalf, buying and selling in the market. The years following the ‘Crisis’ were pretty good for us. Last year was tough - don't really know why: the cycles of the rare book trade are baffling. This year is already much more encouraging.

 

Q. Who of the younger generation (any nationality) do you think has a future, has impressed you? Dealer, institution, collector, philanthropist?  What trends or new areas of interest do you see shaping up?

 

A. In the younger generation, all the youngsters who work for Maggs! But seriously, there appear to be many motivated and brilliant youngsters in the trade and the curatorial world at the moment.

 

Q. Many of the people who read our site are on the "sell" side, i.e. dealers themselves or interested in becoming dealers.  Do you have any words of advice?

 

A. I'm the wrong person to advise on anyone starting dealing. I had such an extraordinary leg up from nepotism, that beyond advising people to choose their parents well I'm at a loss. Besides, there are so many different approaches that succeed there isn't one answer.

 

It might be worth considering which end of the dealer spectrum you will be closer to - the product-led, or the client-led (apologies for the ugly phraseology). The former is typified by the connoisseurial dealer, who knows what he or she believes is important and promotes that, and the latter is the marketer who finds clients, listens to them, and sells what they already want to buy.

 

This is similar, but not the same as the dichotomy between the scholarly bookseller and the merchant dealer. The choice is not black and white of course, and everyone needs to find their place on the balance beam. You've got to like people as well as books.

 

Q. I too come from a bookselling family. When I was a child my father had a long run of Maggs catalogs from the turn of the century to about the late 1920s.  He kept them in the bathroom next to the toilet, and I learned to read from them. I also learned quite a bit about cataloging from them too. I have always loved the Maggs catalogs, how do you maintain the consistently high quality of writing? Informative, persuasive and seldom boring. Do your catalogers go to school? How do they get to be so good?

 

A. Good cataloguing? Caring, that's all. If people don't care about the books, they can't write well about them. I think that the formal and semi-formal education in bookselling that some of the youngsters are getting today is valuable, and they will learn more quickly than us. We were chucked in the deep end. And you've got to realise that the catalogue note is the permanent record of the dealer's engagement with the book - to us books are like favourite grandchildren who we can spoil, love up, and then pass them on to more permanent custodians. It's our way of leaving a mark.

 

Q.  In 2010 there was an interesting story about you in the Guardian, are the facts in that story still true today?  Here's the link: www.theguardian.com/money/2010/oct/09/rare-book-dealer

 

A. Pretty much true. A big development has been in my private life - we took advantage of the recession by upping the quality of our yott, outrageously. See her at bettyalan.com. Our goal is a millionaire's lifestyle on a school teacher's income, and we're just about managing it, though finding the time to use her properly is turning out to be a challenge.

 

Q. It is my impression that a lot of people find Maggs a more than little intimidating. How do you deal with that?

 

A. Yes, there’s an awful sense that Maggs isn’t for everyone – that’s one of the things I was trying to get at when I ranted about not being an institution. Surprisingly we’re not as pompous as people think we are, but I grant that we do have this sort of impregnable feeling.  I’ve worked there for 35 years, and my name’s over the door, yet I still get nervous coming in through the front door.  Give us a try - when you crack our facade we can be quite amiable.




 

Link to web site:  www.maggs.com

 

Among the many interesting items on view at the Maggs site is a link to a video about the Maggs Opium Collection posted in connection with an exhibit in Oct. 2013

www.maggs.com/book_collecting/maggs_journal/the-maggs-opium-exhibition

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams: Results from Fine Books and Manuscripts on March 9, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> BEETHOVEN, LUDWIG VAN. Autograph Manuscript sketch-leaf part of the score of the Scottish Songs, "Sunset" Op. 108 no 2. [Vienna, February 1818]. Inscribed by Alexander Wheelock Thayer. SOLD for $131,250
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> Violin belonging to Albert Einstein, presented to him by Oscar H. Steger, 1933. SOLD for $516,500
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. Autograph Letter Signed ("Papa") to his son Hans Albert, discussing his involvement with the atomic bomb, September 2, 1945. SOLD for $106,250
    <b>Bonhams: Results from Fine Books and Manuscripts on March 9, 2018</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> HAMILTON, ALEXANDER. Autograph Letter Signed, to Baron von Steuben, with extensive notes of Von Steuben's aide Benjamin Walker, June 12, 1780. SOLD for $16,250
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in Latin, being detailed instructions on making the philosopher's stone. 8 pp. 1790s. SOLD for $275,000
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 9:</b> 1869 Inauguration Bible of President Ulysses S. Grant. SOLD for $118,750
  • <b>ALDE: May 30, 2018. Books by painters, original bindings, photography, prints and drawings, illustrated books.</b>
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> BRETON (André). <i>Arcane 17.</i> New York, Brentano's, 1944. One of the 25 first copies with the original etching signed by Roberto Matta. 6000 to 8000 €
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> HÉRON DE VILLEFOSSE (René). <i>La Rivière enchantée.</i> Paris, Bernard Klein, 1951. One of the 25 first copies on japon with an original watercolored drawing signed by Léonard Foujita. 60,000 to 80,000 €
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> ILIAZD. <i>Pirosmanachvili 1914.</i> Paris, Le Degré quarante et un, 1972. Dry point signed by Pablo Picasso. 5,000 to 6,000 €
    <b>ALDE: May 30, 2018. Books by painters, original bindings, photography, prints and drawings, illustrated books.</b>
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> JARRY (Alfred). <i>Ubu Roi.</i> Paris, Tériade, 1966. 13 lithographs by Joan Miró. 6,000 to 8,000 €
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> LEIRIS (Michel). <i>Vivantes cendres, innommées.</i> Paris, Jean Hugues, 1961. 13 original etchings by Alberto Giacometti. 12,000 to 15,000 €
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> MATISSE (Henri). <i>Jazz.</i> Paris, Tériade, 1947. 20 original pochoirs by Henri Matisse. 100,000 to 120,000 €
    <b>ALDE: May 30, 2018. Books by painters, original bindings, photography, prints and drawings, illustrated books.</b>
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> PAULHAN (Jean). <i>De Mauvais sujets.</i> Paris, Les Bibliophiles de l’Union Française, 1958. 10 etchings by Marc Chagall. 5,000 to 6,000 €
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> RONSARD (Pierre de). Layout for the book <i>Florilège des Amours.</i> Paris, Albert Skira, 1948. 128 lithographs, with many corrections by hand by Henri Matisse. 80,000 to 100,000 €
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> TING (Walasse). <i>1¢ life.</i> Bern, E.W. Kornfeld, 1964. One of the 100 deluxe copies with the 62 lithographs signed by the 28 artists. 15,000 to 20,000 €
    <b>ALDE: May 30, 2018. Books by painters, original bindings, photography, prints and drawings, illustrated books.</b>
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> SUGIMOTO (Hiroshi). <i>Time exposed.</i> Kyoto, Kyoto Shoin Co. Ltd., 1991. 51 offset lithographs. 10,000 to 12,000 €
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> SZAFRAN (Sam). Black and brown ink original drawing. 550 x 410 mm. 5,000 to 6,000 €
    <b>ALDE, May 30:</b> KIPLING (Rudyard). <i>La Chasse de Kaa.</i> Paris, Javal et Bourdeaux, 1930. 115 colored woodcuts by Paul Jouve. 5,000 to 6,000 €
  • <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg: Rare Books Auction on May 28th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> Book of Hours. Workshop Vrelant, around 1460-70. Est: € 30,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> J. J. Marinoni, <i>De Astronomica specula,</i> 1745. Est: € 12,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> C. S. Lewis, <i>The Chronicles of Narnia,</i> 1950-56. Est: € 7,500
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg: Rare Books Auction on May 28th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> G. W. Knorr, <i>Regnum florae,</i> 1750. Est:<br>€ 15,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> A. M. S. Boethius, <i>De philosophico consolatu,</i> 1501. Est: € 8,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> J. Joyce, <i>Ulysses,</i> 1922. Est: € 5,000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg: Rare Books Auction on May 28th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> Ornaments by H. Vogeler, 1900. Est:<br>€ 4,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> <i>Biblia Germanica,</i> 1490. Est: € 15,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> F. M. Regenfuss, <i>Auserlesne Schnecken und Muscheln,</i> 1758. Est: € 18,000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg: Rare Books Auction on May 28th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> Einband Henry van de Velde, 1929. Est: € 4,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> <i>Hortus Sanitatis,</i> 1517. Est: € 12,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May 28:</b> R. Crevel and J. Miró, 1957. Est: € 3,500
  • <b>Archives International Auctions: U.S., Chinese & Worldwide Banknotes, Scripophily & Coins. May 23, 2018</b>
    <b>Archives International, May 23:</b> Chinese-American Bank of Commerce, 1920 "Harbin" Branch Issue Rarity. $5, P-S231s1, S/M#C271-3.5b, Specimen banknote. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Archives International, May 23:</b> Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, 1907 "Peking" Branch High Grade Rarity. 5 Taels, P-S280r S/M#T101-11b, Remainder Banknote. $17,000 to $22,000
    <b>Archives International, May 23:</b> Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, 1907, "Tsingtau" Branch Issue Rarity. $1, P-1a S/M#T101-40, Issued banknote. $8,000 to $16,000
    <b>Archives International Auctions: U.S., Chinese & Worldwide Banknotes, Scripophily & Coins. May 23, 2018</b>
    <b>Archives International, May 23:</b> Spanish American War - Three Per Cent Loan of 1898, $20 Bond. Issued and uncanceled. $6,000 to $10,000
    <b>Archives International, May 23:</b> Winnemucca, NV - $5 Ty. 1, The First NB of Winnemucca, Ch# 3575, Fr#1800-1. $3,000 to $5,000
    <b>Archives International, May 23:</b> National Banknote Assortment of Original 1st Charter, Plain Back and Date Back Issues. Lot of 6 notes, Includes Pennsylvania Nationals, First National Bank of Selins Grove, 1865, $1… $3,200 to $4,400
    <b>Archives International Auctions: U.S., Chinese & Worldwide Banknotes, Scripophily & Coins. May 23, 2018</b>
    <b>Archives International, May 23:</b> People's Bank of China, 1950 Issue Banknote. 50,000 Yuan, P-855 KYJ-C157a S/M#C282-, Issued banknote. $7,000 to $12,500
    <b>Archives International, May 23:</b> Pei-Yang Tientsin Bank, ND (ca.1910) Remainder Banknote. $3, P-S2527 S/M#P35-11. $5,000 to $7,000
    <b>Archives International, May 23:</b> Palestine Foundation Fund - Keren Hayesod Specimen Sacrifice Bond 1922. $1,000, Specimen Bond, "For the Up building of Palestine as a Homeland for the Jewish People". $1,500 to $2,500
  • <b>Arenberg Auctions: May 25 and<br>May 26, 2018</b>
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> VAN ORLEY, Richard. "Les avantures de Telemaque fils d'Ulÿsse &c." Set of 86 superb ink drawings. 45,000 to 60,000 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> Gojôraku Tôkaidô [or] Tôkaidô meisho fukei. Processional Tôkaido drawn by Prof. Moro, coloured prints in one set of 100 sheets]. 15,000 to 18,000 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> DURAS, Marguerite. <i>Moderato cantabile.</i> Original lithographs by André Minaux. 22 lithographs. 4,000 to 4,500 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions: May 25 and<br>May 26, 2018</b>
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> ADAMS, Georges. A pair of 18-inch English globes. [London], s.n., [1766]. ORIGINAL GLOBES by Georges Adams dedicated to King George III. 9,000 to 12,000 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> BLAEU, Joan. <i>[Atlas maior, sive cosmographia blaviana, qua solum, salum, coelum, accuratissime describuntur]. Geographia, quae est cosmographiae Blaviana pars prima [...].</i> 250,000 to 350,000 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> VAN DER MEULEN, Adam Frans. <i>[Vues, marches, entrées, passages et autres sujets servant à l'histoire de Louis XIV].</i> 35,000 to 50,000 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions: May 25 and<br>May 26, 2018</b>
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> GALILEI, Galileo. <i>Galileo a Madama Cristina di Lorena</i> (1615). Precious copy of one of the most famous and popular miniature books. 2,500 to 3,000 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> Biblia Vulgata. Latin. [France, last quarter 13th c.] 8,000 to 12,000 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> Horae. Use of Rome. Latin (and a few French rubrics). [Hainaut (Mons or Valenciennes), c. 1490]. 40,000 to 50,000 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions: May 25 and<br>May 26, 2018</b>
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> GARSIAS, Paulus. <i>[Determinationes magistrales contra conclusions Joannis Pici Mirandulae].</i> (Rome, E. Silber, 15 October 1489). 12,000 to 15,000 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> LORRIS, Guillaume de; MEUNG, Jean de. <i>Le rommant de la Rose nouuellement reueu et corrige oultre les precedentes impressions</i> [ed. Guillaume Michel]. 3,000 to 4,000 €
    <b>Arenberg Auctions, May 25 & 26:</b> LA FONTAINE, Jean de. <i>Fables choisies, mises en vers.</i> Paris, Desaint & Saillant, Durand. De l'imprimerie de Charles-Antoine Jombert, 1755<br> [- 1759]. 10,000 to 12,000 €
  • <b>Sotheby’s Books & Manuscripts<br>Marcel Proust – Collection Marie-Claude Mante<br>Auction Paris 24 May 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> Marc Chagall. <i>Daphnis & Chloé</i>. Paris, Tériade, 1961. 42 original lithographs. One of the 10 copies for the collaborators. 80,000-120,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> [Marcel Proust] — Gaston Gallimard. Very important letters to Marcel Proust. 1912-1922. 100,000-150,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> JESUITS. <i>Relation de ce qui s’est passé en la Nouvelle France en 1635</i> […] 1672. Period calf binding. Very rare set of letters about life in the French territories among warring Indian tribes. 12,000-18,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Books & Manuscripts<br>Marcel Proust – Collection Marie-Claude Mante<br>Auction Paris 24 May 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> Gustave Flaubert. <i>Madame Bovary</i>. Paris, Michel Lévy Frères, 1857. One of the few deluxe copies, with inscription to Adolphe Gaïffe and a letter. 30,000-50,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> A. von Humboldt. <i>Essai politique sur le Royaume de la Nouvelle Espagne.</i> Paris, 1811. Period binding. Complete with the large California/Mexico map. 10,000-15,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> [Affaire Dreyfus] — Georges Clemenceau. <i>Démosthène</i>. Paris, Plon-Nourrit et Cie, 1926. Exceptional copy with an inscription to Mathieu Dreyfus, Alfred Dreyfus’ brother. 8,000-<br>12,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Books & Manuscripts<br>Marcel Proust – Collection Marie-Claude Mante<br>Auction Paris 24 May 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> Guillaume Apollinaire. <i>Les trois Don Juan</i>. 1914. Unpublished inscription to Madeleine Pagès and 2 original drawings. 25,000-35,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> Marcel Duchamp. <i>L.H.O.O.Q. shaved</i>. [New York, 1965]. One of the 100 deluxe signed copies. With an autographed envelope. 15,000-20,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> Francis Bacon — Michel Leiris. <i>Miroir de la tauromachie</i>. [Paris], Daniel Lelong, [1990]. With 4 signed lithographs. 40,000-60,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Books & Manuscripts<br>Marcel Proust – Collection Marie-Claude Mante<br>Auction Paris 24 May 2018</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> Gilbert & George. <i>The Red Sculpture Album</i>. [Londres, Gilbert & George], 1975. One of the 100 existing copies, signed by both of the artists, comprised of 11 original photographs. 10,000-15,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> Pablo Picasso — Honoré de Balzac. <i>Chef-d’œuvre inconnu</i>. Paris, Ambroise Vollard, 1931. One of the 65 deluxe copies on Japan paper, with an extra suite of the etchings. 35,000-<br>45,000 €
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, May 24:</b> Marcel Proust. <i>Les Sources sur Loir</i>. Ca 1907-1908. Handwritten manuscript. Rough draft of one of the more beautiful passages of Swann’s Way. 30,000-50,000 €
  • <b>Christie’s 29 May:</b> MARE-BONNARD. Les Pastorales de Longus, or Daphnis et Chloé. Paris, 1902. Exceptional copy with a magnificent binding by André Mare. €50,000 to €70,000
    <b>Christie’s 29 May:</b> REDOUTE – L’HERITIER. Stirpes novae, illustratae iconibus. Paris [1784-1791]. Great paper copy with additional color touches on several plates. €10,000 to €15,000
    <b>Christie’s 29 May:</b> TOULOUSE-LAUTREC – IBELS – MONTORGUEIL. Le Café -Concert. Paris, [1893]. Famous Belle Epoque illustrations by Toulouse-Lautrec and Ibels. €5,000 to €7,000
    <b>Christie’s 29 May:</b> MANET – MALLARME – POE. Le Corbeau. The Raven. Paris, 1875. First edition of Mallarmé’s translation. Inscribed by Manet and Mallarmé to Gambetta. €60,000 to €80,000

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