• <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Excessively Rare Benjamin Franklin Imprint. Estaugh (John). <i>A Call to the Unfaithful Professors of Truth</i>, Philadelphia: Printed by B. Franklin, 1744. €7,000 – 10,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Original Signed Volume from the Dean Swift's Library. [Swift (Dr. Jonathan)] Grotius (Hugo). <i>De Jure Belli ac Pacis Libri Tres</i>, Amsterdam: (J. Blaeu) 1670. €10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Cresswell (Samuel Gurney). <i>A Series of Eight Sketches in Colour; together with a Coloured Map of the Route</i>, London: (Day & Son) July 25, 1854.<br>€15,000 – 20,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Of Legendary Rarity - First Printing of Shakespeare Outside England. Shakespeare (Wm.). <i>The Works of Shakespeare</i> In Eight Volumes. Dublin: 1726.<br>€7,000 – 10,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Lewin (W.). <i>The Birds of Great Britain</i>, 8 vols in 4, with 335 hand-coloured plates, 1795 – 1801. €1,500 – 2,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> 18th Century Manuscript Relating to Massachusetts Bay, c. 1750.<br>€350 – 500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Alexander (Wm.). <i>Picturesque Representations of The Dress and Manners of the Chinese</i>, with 50 hand-coloured plates, 1814. €600 – 800
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Manuscript Estate Atlas - Neville (Arthur Richard). <i>The Estate of Sir John Coghill Bart</i>, 1791. €10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Unique Collection of Ballads by Brendan Behan Behan. €3,000 – 4,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Maps & Works of Art. December 13, 2016</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Original Manuscript of Edith Somerville's Unpublished Children's Book. Somerville (Edith). <i>GROWLY-WOWLY. Or, The Story of the Three Little Pigs</i>. €3,500 – 5,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Full Set of Cuala Press Broadsides with fine hand-coloured illustrations by Jack B. Yeats, 1908 – 1915. €4,000 – 6,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Dec. 13:</b> Eyzinger (Michael). <i>Ad Leonis Belgici Topographicam atque Historicam Descriptionem</i>, [Cologne:] 1586. €3,000 – 4,000
  • <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. <i>Die Grundlage der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie.</i> Leipzig: Johann Ambrosius Barth, 1916.<br>$80,000 – 120,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. Autograph Manuscript in English, Signed Integrally ("Isaac Newton"). $50,000 – 70,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life</i>. London: John Murray, 1859. $25,000 – 35,000
    <b>Bonhams: History of Science and Technology. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> NEWTON, ISAAC. <i>The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.</i> London: Benjamin Motte, 1729.<br>$20,000 – 30,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEISENBERG, WERNER. Autograph Manuscript entitled "<i>Entwicklung der Theorie der Elementarteilche,</i>” [1964].<br>$15,000 – 25,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> BERNOULLI, DANIEL. <i>Hydrodynamica, sive De viribus et motibus fluidorum commentarii.</i> Strasbourg: Johann Heinrich Decker for Johann Reinhold Dulsecker, 1738. $5,000 – 7,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> [TARKOVSKY, ANDREI ARSENIEVICH.] STRUGATSKY, BORIS AND ARKADY. Typed Manuscript for <i>Stalker</i>, being the director's working script, 1977. $150,000 – 200,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> HEMINGWAY, ERNEST. Typed Manuscript of "Marlin Off the Morro: A Cuban Letter," n.p., [1933]. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> SALINGER, JEROME DAVID. 4 Autograph Letters, 2 of which Signed ("Jerry") and 6 Typed Letters, 2 of which Initialed ("J"). $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams: Voices of the 20th Century. December 7, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> PASTERNAK, BORIS LEONIDOVICH. Typed Manuscript Carbon, "Doktor Zhivago," with some typed corrections, Moscow, 1948. $30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> MILNE, ALAN ALEXANDER. Autograph Manuscript Signed 3 times ("A.A. Milne"), entitled "Peace with Honour: An Enquiry into the War Convention," 1934.<br>$30,000 – 50,000
    <b>Bonhams Dec. 7:</b> FROST, ROBERT. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("Robert Frost"), titled "Gold for Christmas," 1952. $15,000 – 20,000
  • <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 200.<br>The North American Indian, vol.I-XIII. £60,000-80,000
    <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 202. Geronimo - Apache. £600-800
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 225.<br>A Chief of the Desert - Navaho. £1000-1500
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 267.<br>An Oasis in the Bad Lands. £600-800
    <b>Bloomsbury Auctions: Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian. December 15, 2016</b>
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 303.<br>The Scout in Winter - Apsaroke. £800-1200
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 320.<br>Sitting Bear - Arikara. £500-700
    <b>Bloomsbury Dec. 15: </b> Lot 475. <br>A Nakoaktok Chief's Daughter. <br>£600-800
  • <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> John Wycliffe. <i>WYCLIFFITE NEW TESTAMENT IN THE LATER VERSION, IN MIDDLE ENGLISH [ENGLAND, 1ST HALF OF THE 15TH CENTURY]</i>. $500,000-800,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in English [King James Version]. <i>THE HOLY BIBLE, CONTEYNING THE OLD TESTAMENT, AND THE NEW… LONDON: ROBERT BARKER, 1611.</i> $400,000-600,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in English. Tyndale's Pentateuch. <i>THE FIRSTE BOKE OF MOSES CALLED GENESIS [?FYFTE BOKE OF MOSES CALLED DEUTERONOMYE.] [ANTWERP: JOHAN HOOCHSTRATEN, 1530].</i> $300,000-500,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Eliot, John. <i>[BIBLE IN MASSACHUSET, NATICK DIALECT:] MAMUSSE WUNNEETUPANATAMWE UP-BIBLIUM GOD… CAMBRIDGE, MA: SAMUEL GREEN AND MARMADUKE JOHNSON, 1663–61.</i> $175,000-250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> [Italian Bible]. <i>BIBLE WITH PROLOGUES AND INTERPRETATIONS OF HEBREW NAMES, IN LATIN. [ITALY (PROBABLY BOLOGNA)], DATED 1273</I>.<br>$150,000-250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in English, Coverdale's Version. <i>BIBLIA. THE BIBLE, THAT IS, THE HOLY SCRIPTURE OF THE OLDE AND NEW TESTAMENT, FAITHFULLY AND TRULY TRANLSATED OUT OF DOUCHE AND LATYN IN TO ENGLISH, 1535-1536.</i> $150,000-250,00
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible, Polyglot [The Complutensian Polyglot]. <i>VETUS TESTAMENTUM MULTIPLICI LINGUA NUNC PRIMO IMPRESSUM… [ALCALÀ DE HENARES: ARNAO GUILLÉN DE BROCAR, 1514–1517]</i>. $80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Psalter in Greek. <i>[GREEK TITLE: PSALTÊRION]. VENICE: ALDUS MANUTIUS [CA. 1496-1498; NOT AFTER 1 OCTOBER 1498]</i>. $80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in German. <i>BIBLIA, DAS IST DIE GANTZE HEILIGE SCHRIFT DEUDSCH.  AUGSBURG: HEYNRICH STEYNER, 1535</i>. $80,000-120,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie. December 5, 2016</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Thomas à Kempis. <i>IMITATIO CHRISTI. [AUGSBURG:] GÜNTHER ZAINER, [NOT AFTER 6 MAY 1473]</i>. $50,000-70,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> The Four Gospels, in Greek. <i>FOUR GOSPELS WITH COMMENTARY, IN GREEK. [CONSTANTINOPLE, 11TH CENTURY]</i>. $50,000-80,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York Dec. 5:</b> Bible in Latin. <i>A LEAF FROM THE GUTENBERG BIBLE. [MAINZ: JOHANN GUTENBERG AND JOHANN FUST, 1455]</I>.<br> $50,000-70,000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2014 Issue

Brantôme & the Art of Duels - Wan’ my picture?

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Seigneur de Brantôme.

I had an idiotic argument in the street the other day, with a guy who considered I had stared at him. Wan’ my picture? he said. Push never came to shove, and we wisely went our separate ways. I couldn’t help thinking that such a nonsense behaviour would have led us, some two hundred years ago, to a deadly fight—a duel! Thus our brutal ancestors defended their honour at the slightest provocation. But how come such a barbaric custom became so generally established among them? When I look for an answer, I have a conditioned reflex: I open a book. The one I picked up on this occasion is a volume of the memoirs of Brantôme (circa 1540-1614); the one Contenans les anecdotes (...) touchant les duels—about the anecdotes linked to duels (A Leyde, chez Jean Sambix—1722). It plunged me into a world of honour, absurdity, and brutal deaths—and it also reminded me of an old ripped coat.

 

 

When the Roman Empire fell, the Barbarians left the North of Europe to invade the rest of the continent, taking their customs with them—including duels. Among these new migrants were the Lombards—from the current Germany—, who took over Italy in the late 6th century. “These people were fierce to the extreme,” reads L’Esprit de l’Encyclopédie (Paris, 1798). “They knew no laws, no discipline and had no social rules. All their virtue was at the point of their swords, and they knew no right but might. They settled their problems with swords: the belligerents fought one another, and the winner was always right.” This practice, known as the art of duel, spread like a disease; mainly in France, Spain and Italy, “where,” stated Mr de Saintfoix in his Essais historiques sur Paris (Londres, 1759), “people were a little bit too proud to be men.” Christianity soon justified duels. The idea was simple: God would rather make a miracle than to let injustice prevail. When a quarrel occurred, and when it was impossible to decide who was right from wrong, the belligerents resorted to fight before God. Of course, the winner was sometimes convincted of felony later on. But as our author Brantôme put it: “God moves in a mysterious way, and His gifts of justice, equity and mercy are not to be discussed.” Others claimed that the innocent victims paid for earlier crimes, while their wicked executioners would soon pay for theirs—including this one.

 

Thus governed by holy and social rules, duels gave birth to fighters as well as theorists. Brantôme wasn’t a specialist, so to speak; and he wisely bowed to the Italian masters, who published numerous books on the matter—he respectfully called them the Duelists. But he was a warlike young man, who almost joined the Knights of Malta at one point, and who knew what he was talking about as well as who he was talking about. While at Court, he collected many stories and anecdotes from the great Captains of his time. His posthumous memoirs weren’t printed before 1655-56, in Leyde, chez Jean Sambix (1), and didn’t enjoy success until reprinted in 1722. They are still sought-after today, and the different titles—including the lives of the great French Captains of his time, of the great foreign Captains, and anecdotes about duels—are often sold independently. The one about duels never came out before 1722. “We don’t know who was the true publisher of Discours sur les Duels,” stated the Notice sur Brantôme (Paris, 1824). “So many reprints appeared in its wake that it would be hard, but also useless, to name them all. Several bear the false indication Chez Jean Sambix (2), including the first one of 1722, which is well-printed.”

 

Brantôme “wrote just like he spoke,” once said a writer; as a matter of fact, his style is suffocating. The volume about duels features no chapters, no titles. From top to bottom, it is laid on paper like one long breath. But it’s stuffed with incredible details and thrilling anecdotes. “No matter the disorder of his writings,” confessed Anquetil in the 18th century, “Brantôme’s book pleases, because it’s entertaining.” As a matter of fact, this book is a breath-taking reading featuring fierce people cutting each other’s throat over matters of honour that sometimes seem so ridiculous that we hardly believe one could die over them. And yet.

 

Two bulls in a pen

 

Until 1546, duels took place in a camp clos, or closed pen—usually located in a churchyard. In the 9th century, Pope Nicolas I considered duels as legitimate and lawful, and many religious got involved—when necessary, they hired the arms of fighters to represent their church. In the early 14th century, the French king Philippe le Bel ordered the pens to be 40 feet wide and 80 feet long. As stated by Brantôme about the duel that cost the life of Don Alonzo, in Italy—defeated by the famous Bayard—, the pens were often “simply bounded by some piles of big stones.” He who stepped outside the limits had lost. The ceremonial was quite complex and the fighters were expected to ride from their places, with “any reasonable offensive and defensive weapon” carried before them by their kinsmen. Upon reaching the pen, they swore on the crucifix and on the holiness of baptism that they considered to be in their own right. Then the fight started, usually in front of a consequent audience. Duels were barbaric in the way that the winner could dispose at will of the loser—be he dead or alive! Not only did you lose your quarrel when defeated, but you also lost all your goods, your life and your spiritual salvation, as the law adapted from the Lombards’ made it clear that a loser couldn’t be given a Christian burial; “just like an Arab or a Sarasin,” deplored Brantôme. “How cruel!” But you were lucky if you died on the battlefield; because if you survived your wounds, you became less than a beast in the hands of the winner. “He had the right to drag you all through the pen (a jolly idea deriving for the sane reading of Homer’s Iliad, editor’s note), to hang you, burn you, to hold you prisoner,” enumerated Brantôme. “In a word, he could treat you worse than a slave.” But in 1547, a tricky fight put an official end to duels.

 

The trick of Jarnac

 

The last duel officially authorized by the King of France took place on July 10, 1547; and it opposed two friends, namely Gui Chabot de Jarnac and François Vivonne de la Châtaigneraie. It all started the day the former boasted of having sex with his mother-in-law to the latter, who repeated it to François I; the King later teased Jarnac, who firmly denied, and demanded justice—but François I opposed the duel. A few months after the King’s death, Henri II gave them the permission, as La Châtaigneraie was his favourite. Several thousands of people gathered the said day on the terrace of the castle of Saint-Germain, near Paris. Five hundred men supported La Châtaigneraie, all wearing his colours—white and rosy pink; Jarnac had 100 men with him, all dressed in black and white. Nobody expected Jarnac to win this fight; indeed, although smaller and younger than his friend, La Châtaigneraie was “one of the strongest and the most skilful gentlemen of France with any weapon; and there was no better wrestler in the kingdom,” wrote his nephew Brantôme. But Jarnac teamed up with a clever master of arms, Captain Caize, who imposed many constraints to La Châtaigneraie. First, he insisted that both fighters should carry a specific shield that restrained the mobility of the left arm; “this was of great disadvantage to my uncle,” wrote Brantome, “who was still recovering from a shot of harquebuse received in his right arm during the assault of the city of Cony, in Piémont.” The Judges of the pen didn’t oppose this constraint; neither did the relatives of La Chataigneraie, who were probably overconfident “in the bold courage of my uncle.” (Brantôme) Then, as he had the choice of arms, Jarnac asked his opponent to equip himself with “more than thirty different weapons; he imposed various horses, such as steeds, Turkish, Barb horses, (...) all harnessed in various fashions (...). He did it to take his enemy by surprise, but also to force him to spend a lot of money.” As a matter of fact, the King had to support La Châtegneraie so he could attend the fight with all the required equipment. And the duelist publicly complained that Jarnac was trying to fight him both “spiritually and financially.”

 

Nonetheless, the duel took place, and despite being feverish, Jarnac was ready. Most duelists aimed at the head or chest of their opponent, but Jarnac acted in a different way. Thanks to a skilful bout he had practiced with Captain Caize, he wounded La Châtaigneraie a little above the left knee. He did it twice in a row, eventually forcing the King to throw his baton; this gesture instantly put an end to the fight—should any fighter hit after that, he would immediately be put to death. “The Jarnac’s trick has now became an adage,” underlines the Dictionary of Feller (Liège, 1790). “It is used to describe a trick, or an unexpected response from an opponent.” The King intervened, yes; “but too late,” deplored Brantôme. Indeed, his cousin was badly hurt—but mostly in his pride. He refused to have his wound correctly bandaged, and died from it a few days later. Though all parties agreed to declare that it had been a fair duel, “Henry II was so mortified that he solemnly swore he would never permit any more duel,” stated L’Esprit de l’Encyclopédie. But men of honour were stubborn, and a few days later, two soldier friends had a fight in Piémont simply because the first one couldn’t believe what the second one was telling him about the circumstances La Châtaigneraie’s death—“both of them ended up seriously wounded,” underlined Brantôme. This was a foretelling fight. Indeed, the ban on duels curiously made them more frequent.

 

Combatere a la mazza

 

The successors of Henri II all reinforced the laws against duels, and the Council of Trent made it clear that the Church no longer supported this custom: “If an Emperor, King or any other Prince or Lord, enables some Christians to fight a duel on his lands, he shall be excommunicated and deprived of his lordship,” read L’Histoire du Concile de Trente (Pierre Chouët, 1635). The same treatment was to be applied to “those who advise the duelists”, and to “the mere spectators”. Notwithstanding this dreadful warning, duels grew more numerous, especially in France where the King never ratified the Council of Trent. Mr de Saintfoix had an explanation: “Before that, upon fighting surreptitiously, a man lost his honour, and was considered a petty murderer. Furthermore, when officially asking for a duel, he informed of his quarrel; and people around him always tried to end it in a peaceful way. The man who was wrong was also necessarily impressed at the oath he had to take before the fight; and you had no choice but to win or die without honour.” Less regulated, duels flourished as duelists started to call each other at la mazza—in the open field. According to Brantôme, this new form of duel originated in Naples, Italy, where “people started to call each other outside the cities, in the fields, in the forests or among hedges and bushes—hence the expression “combatere a la mazza.” The beginning of the end for the learnt theorists, who unanimously condemned this new savage way—mainly, stated Brantôme, because it meant fighting without protection, “like gross beasts”. Things even got worse as the witnesses started to wonder: What are we doing while our friends are fighting? Let’s fight as well! Thus, duels became pitched battles! And all these people killed each other “for the pleasure rather than out of animosity” (Brantôme). The winner ran a penalty risk, but was usually granted a complacent royal pardon—Henry IV issued more seven thousands in less than 18 years. That’s probably why Mr Feller wrote, in 1791: “These duels between individuals (at la mazza, editor’s note) have shed more blood in the last two hundred years, than the duels in closed pens since their origins.” It looks like people were wholeheartedly cutting each other’s throat at the slightest remark, fearing no danger, and standing as true heralds of honour in a world long disappeared. Yet, throughout Brantôme’s book, it seems that man has been man ever since David slew Goliath in a duel; and that when it comes to defend one’s life, all is fair.

 

Gentle Merciful Men

 

Duels might have taken place in the Bush, they still obeyed complex and unwritten rules. For instance, suppose you decided to spare your enemy’s life once he was at your mercy. What were the proper words to utter on such an occasion? Brantôme seriously reasoned about the matter. “To say “Ask for mercy and I’ll spare you!” or “Beg for your life, and I won’t kill you!” is a terrible thing to do, as no man of heart will ever accept to utter them, and would rather suffer a hundred deaths.” Really and truly, it was nicer “to gently and gracefully spare your opponent’s life.” Some went as far as pretending to be wounded, to belittle the shame of their victim. It happened, reported Brantôme, with two Captains in Piémont. The first one wounded the second one and decided to let him live, as both men were friends. But the defeated soldier asked another favour, probably as important as life to him: “Please, be merciful all the way, and wear a bandage for a few days, so it won’t be said that I was wounded without wounding.”

 

But “too good, too dumb”, goes the French saying; and a hold hand at duels such as Matas should have known better than to leave his opponent unarmed after he had disarmed him in the Bois de Vincennes in the late 16th century. “You can go, young man,” he said. “And learn to hold your sword firmly, and not to attack a man like me; go away, I forgive you.” But as he was mounting his horse, the young man took up his arm, ran to him, “and pierced him to death on the spot.” (Brantôme) Matas was mourned, and blamed for his lack of foresight. Other duelists, especially the Italians—the most cruel, said Brantôme—, left a mark on the face of their victims, or left them lying on the ground, half-dead and, ideally, definitely maimed; thus they could neither retaliate nor deny their defeat—as most of these duels took place without witnesses, the two versions of the same fight often varied. After all, honour and precaution can go together, cant’ they? Well, let’s put it straight: when it comes to fight for your life, honour comes second—even when you fight over it.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> CURTIS, EDWARD. <i>Original glass plate photograph, Honovi – Walpi Snake Priest, prepared by Curtis for the printing of The North American Indian</i>, c.1910
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN WEST.), Watkins, Taber, Savage, and others. <i>Magnificent Album of Mammoth Photographs of the American West, with other subjects various</i>, ca. 1865-1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>Darwin Family Photograph Album</i>. Down, Kent, 1871-1879
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (SECRET SERVICE). <i>The photographic archive, papers, and relics of William Kennoch, Secret Service Agent</i>. Various places, 1870s and 1880s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (AMERICAN REVOLUTION). <i>Daguerreotype Portrait of Baltus Stone, the earliest photo of a Revolution veteran,</i> 1846
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1863. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Laurie & Whittle, <i>The Complete East-India Pilot</i>, with 113 maps, London, 1797. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> George W. Browning, 134 sketches of natural history & landscape subjects, American West, 1880s-90s.<br>$4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Catesby & Ehret, <i>Magnolia Grandiflora</i>, from first edition <i>Natural History of Carolina</i>, London, 1731-43. $5,000 to $7,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Petrus Plancius, <i>The Spice Map</i>, hand-colored, London, 1598.<br>$20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b><br>John Miller, <i>Illustratio Systematis Sexualis Linnaei</i>, London, 1770-77. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Thomas Shotter Boys, <i>Original Views of London As It Is</i>, de luxe issue, 26 hand-colored lithographs, London, 1842. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Frederick de Wit, <i>Belgi XVII Provinciarum Tabula</i>, true first state wall map, Amsterdam, ca 1670. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b><br>John James Audubon, <i>Passenger Pigeon, Plate LXII</i>, aquatint & engraving before color, London, 1829. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Joannes Clericus, <i>Atlas Atiquus, Sacer, Ecclesiasticus et Profanus</i>, Amsterdam, 1705. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:<br>Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Matthaus Seutter, <i>Atlas Novus sive Tabulae Geographicae totius Orbis</i>, Augsburg, ca 1735.<br>$10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> William Roscoe, <i>Monandrian Plants of the Order Scitamineae</i>, Liverpool, 1824-28. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b><br>John James Audubon, <i>The Mocking Bird</i>, hand-colored aquatint & engraving, London, 1827.<br>$7,000 to $10,000.
  • <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [ARTILLERY]. KITCHEN, D.C. <i>Record of the Wyoming Artillerists.</I> Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania: Alvin Day Printer, 1874. $2,000-4,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> UNITED STATES AND MEXICAN BOUNDARY COMMISSION. EMORY, William Hemsley. <i>Report of the United States and Mexican Boundary Survey, Made under the Direction of the Secretary of the Interior…</i><br>$3,000-6,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> RICHARDSON, William H. <i>Journal of William H. Richardson, a Private Soldier in the Campaign of New and Old Mexico…</i>. Baltimore: John H. Woods, 1848. $3,000-6,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> GARCÍA CONDE, Pedro. <i>Carta geografica general de la Republica Mexicana…</i> $30,000-60,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> EMORY, William Hemsley. <i>Map of Texas and the Countries Adjacent: Compiled in the Bureau of the Corps of Topographical Engineers; From the Best Authorities…</i> [Washington, 1844]. $7,500-15,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> THORPE, Thomas Bangs. <i>Our Army at Monterey. Being a Correct Account of the Proceedings and Events which Occurred to the “Army of Occupation”…</i> Philadelphia, 1847. $400-800
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> <i>The Rough and Ready Songster: Embellished with Twenty-Five Splendid Engravings, Illustrative of the American Victories in Mexico…</i> New York; St. Louis, Mo [ca. 1848].<br>$500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> CURRIER, Nathaniel (publisher). <i>The Brilliant Charge of Capt. May At the Battle of Resaca de la Palma (Palm Ravine) 9th of May…</i> $150-300 
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [RINGGOLD, SAMUEL]. WYNNE, James. <i>Memoir of Major Samuel Ringgold, United States Army: Read Before the Maryland Historical Society, April 1st, 1847.</i> Baltimore, 1847. $500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Rare Books:<br>La Invasíon Norteamericana and the Mexican-American War.<br>December 15 & 16, 2016</b>
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [TAYLOR, ZACHARY]. <i>Life of General Taylor from the Best Authorities.</i> New York: Nafis and Cornish; St. Louis, Mo.: Nafis, Cornish & Co., 1847.<br>$500-1,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> TILDEN, Bryant Parrott, Jr. <i>Notes on the Upper Rio Grande, Explored in the Months of October and November, 1846, on Board the U.S. Steamer Major Brown…</i> Philadelphia, 1847.<br>$5,000-10,000
    <b>Dorothy Sloan Books Dec. 15 & 16:</b> [WORTH, WILLIAM J.]. <i>Life of General Worth; To Which is Added a Sketch of the Life of Brigadier-General Wool.</i> New York: Nafis & Cornish; St. Louis, Mo.: Nafis, Cornish & Co., 1847.<br>$200-400

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