• <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts: Books & Manuscripts Online Auction. May 23 - June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Andrew Wyeth, an archive of 43 unpublished letters. $80,000-120,000 [lot 1106]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Abraham Lincoln, signed document granting pensions to surviving Revolutionary War Veterans, 1865. $60,000-80,000 [lot 1058]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Forlani Map of North America, 1566. $40,000-60,000 [lot 1555]
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts: Books & Manuscripts Online Auction. May 23 - June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> <i>Journal des Dames et des Modes</i>, 1912-1914. $4,000-6,000 [lot 1294]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Book of Hours, Use of Rouen, late 14th Century. $30,000-40,000 [lot 1162]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Schedel, World Map, 1493. $5,000-7,000 [lot 1589]
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts: Books & Manuscripts Online Auction. May 23 - June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Sir Isaac Newton’s copy of <i>Le Grand’s Institutio Philosophiae</i>, 1675. $5,000-7,000 [lot 1308]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Muhammad Mu'min Husaini’s Tuhfat al-Mu'minin, 17th century Persian medical manuscript on paper. $4,000-6,000 [lot 1118]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Persian Calligraphy, an album. $4,000-6,000 [lot 1119]
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts: Books & Manuscripts Online Auction. May 23 - June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Edgar Allan Poe, <i>Tales</i>, New York: Wiley & Putnam, 1845. $3,00-5,000 [lot 1361]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> English New Testament, Douay-Rheims, 1582, first edition. $10,000-15,000 [lot 1154]
  • <b>Forum Auctions: Important Books & Manuscripts. May 24, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Columnis (Guido de). <i>Historia destructionis Troiae</i>, first edition, 1477-79.<br>Est. £30,000 - 40,000
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Modus versificando. Extraordinary sammelband of 21 works collected by a German humanist, 1492-1519. Est. £40,000 - 60,000
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Mary I & King Philip II. Letter signed to Lord Paget signed "Mary the Quene" and "Philipp R" and endorsed "By the King and the Quene", 1p., Westminster, 29th January 1555.<br>Est. £18,000 - 20,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Important Books & Manuscripts. May 24, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Pontanus (Ludovicus). <i>Singularia</i>, Lyon, 1517. Est. £4,000 - 6,000
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Greene (Graham). <i>The Confidential Agent</i>, first edition, 1939. Est. £1,500 - 2,000
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Dodgson (Rev. C.L.). <i>The Hunting of the the Snark</i>, presentation copy inscribed by the author, 1876. Est. £2,500 - 3,500
    <b>Forum Auctions: Important Books & Manuscripts. May 24, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Bacon (Sir Francis). <i>The Tvvoo Bookes of Francis Bacon</i>, first edition, 1605. Est. £1,000 - 1,500
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Metcalf (John Henry). <i>Armorial Sketches</i>, manuscript 1850. Est. £2,000 - 3,000
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Firdausi (Abu'l-Qasim). <i>Shahnama [The Book of Kings]</i>, with 20 minaitures, probably Kashmir, [late 18th/early 19th century]. Est. £2,000 - 3,000
  • <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés in association with Sotheby’s: La bibliothèque de Pierre Bergé - Music and Poetry. 28 June 2017
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in association with Sotheby’s, June 28:</b> Jean de Lassus. Songs and madrigals. Album of three collections of secular music for tenor. Est: 15,000-20,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Richard Wagner. <i>Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg</i> [Booklet annotated by Wagner]. Original edition, corrected and annotated by Wagner.<br>Est: 60,000-80,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Claude Debussy. <i>La Damoiselle élue</i>. Lyric poem, after Rossetti. Limited ed of 160 copies: #98 of 125 on white vellum. Cover w/famous lithograph by Maurice Denis. Est: 6,000-8,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés in association with Sotheby’s: La bibliothèque de Pierre Bergé - Music and Poetry. 28 June 2017
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Stéphane Mallarmé. <i>A Throw of the Dice Will Never Abolish Chance</i>. Corrected proofs. With autograph documents and lithographs by Redon.<br>Est: 10,000-15,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Henri Sauguet. <i>Les Forains</i>. Ballet. Reduction for piano. Paris, Rouart, Lerolle & Cie, 1946. Binding of the time. Original edition.<br>Est: 20,000-30,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Athanasius Kircher. <i>Musurgia Universalis sive Ars Magna Consoni et Dissoni in X. Libros digesta</i>. Rare original edition of the first musical encyclopedia.<br>Est: 30,000-40,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés in association with Sotheby’s: La bibliothèque de Pierre Bergé - Music and Poetry. 28 June 2017
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> François Villon & Clément Marot. <i>Les Œuvres de Françoys Villon de Paris</i>, reviewed and delivered in their entirety by Clement Marot, valet de chambre of the Roy. Est: 15,000-20,000
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Rainer Maria Rilke. <i>Larenopfer</i> (Offering to the Lares gods). Original edition. The second collection of Rainer Maria Rilke, containing ninety poems.<br>Est: 6,000-8,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Frédéric Chopin. <i>Scherzo for piano</i>, Paris, 1837. Exceptional score with authograph to his virtuoso student Jeanne Porte. Est: 15,000-20,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés in association with Sotheby’s: La bibliothèque de Pierre Bergé - Music and Poetry. 28 June 2017
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Paul Éluard. <i>Capitale de la douleur.</i> One the most beautiful poetic collections from the 1st surrealist wave, bearing an autograph by the author to Coco Chanel. Est: 15,000-20,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Pierre de Ronsard. <i>Les Amours... </i> newly augmented by the author, and commented by Marc Antoine de Muret. Plus a few Odes from the author, not yet printed.<br>Est: 40,000-60,000 €
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b><br>Shaw & Nodder, <i>The Naturalist's Miscellany</i>, complete, London, 1789-1813. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Samuel Baker, <i>A New and Exact Map of the Island of St. Christopher</i>, London, 1753. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Henry Briggs, <i>The North Part of America</i>, London, 1625. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b><br>John James Audubon, <i>Herring Gull</i>, CCXCI, hand-colored plate, London, 1836. $7,000 to $10,000. 
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Montanus & Ogilby, <i>America: Being the Latest, and Most Accurate Description of the New World</i>, London, 1671. $10,000 to $15,000. 
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Robert Cruikshank, portfolio of 25 watercolors, London, 1830s. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Group of 55 French watercolors depicting the life and deeds of Napoleon, 1800s. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Aaron & Samuel Arrowsmith, <i>Chart of the Sandwich Islands</i>, London, 1830. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Herman Moll, <i>A New and Exact Map of the Dominions of the King of Great Britain</i>, London, 1735. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Jacques-Nicolas Bellin,<i> L'Hydrographie Françoise</i>, Paris, circa 1770. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres, <i>Charlestown the Capital of South Carolina</i>, London, 1780. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Arnold Colom, <i>Pascaarte van Nieu Nederlandt</i>, Amsterdam, circa 1658. $7,000 to $10,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2014 Issue

Brantôme & the Art of Duels - Wan’ my picture?

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Seigneur de Brantôme.

I had an idiotic argument in the street the other day, with a guy who considered I had stared at him. Wan’ my picture? he said. Push never came to shove, and we wisely went our separate ways. I couldn’t help thinking that such a nonsense behaviour would have led us, some two hundred years ago, to a deadly fight—a duel! Thus our brutal ancestors defended their honour at the slightest provocation. But how come such a barbaric custom became so generally established among them? When I look for an answer, I have a conditioned reflex: I open a book. The one I picked up on this occasion is a volume of the memoirs of Brantôme (circa 1540-1614); the one Contenans les anecdotes (...) touchant les duels—about the anecdotes linked to duels (A Leyde, chez Jean Sambix—1722). It plunged me into a world of honour, absurdity, and brutal deaths—and it also reminded me of an old ripped coat.

 

 

When the Roman Empire fell, the Barbarians left the North of Europe to invade the rest of the continent, taking their customs with them—including duels. Among these new migrants were the Lombards—from the current Germany—, who took over Italy in the late 6th century. “These people were fierce to the extreme,” reads L’Esprit de l’Encyclopédie (Paris, 1798). “They knew no laws, no discipline and had no social rules. All their virtue was at the point of their swords, and they knew no right but might. They settled their problems with swords: the belligerents fought one another, and the winner was always right.” This practice, known as the art of duel, spread like a disease; mainly in France, Spain and Italy, “where,” stated Mr de Saintfoix in his Essais historiques sur Paris (Londres, 1759), “people were a little bit too proud to be men.” Christianity soon justified duels. The idea was simple: God would rather make a miracle than to let injustice prevail. When a quarrel occurred, and when it was impossible to decide who was right from wrong, the belligerents resorted to fight before God. Of course, the winner was sometimes convincted of felony later on. But as our author Brantôme put it: “God moves in a mysterious way, and His gifts of justice, equity and mercy are not to be discussed.” Others claimed that the innocent victims paid for earlier crimes, while their wicked executioners would soon pay for theirs—including this one.

 

Thus governed by holy and social rules, duels gave birth to fighters as well as theorists. Brantôme wasn’t a specialist, so to speak; and he wisely bowed to the Italian masters, who published numerous books on the matter—he respectfully called them the Duelists. But he was a warlike young man, who almost joined the Knights of Malta at one point, and who knew what he was talking about as well as who he was talking about. While at Court, he collected many stories and anecdotes from the great Captains of his time. His posthumous memoirs weren’t printed before 1655-56, in Leyde, chez Jean Sambix (1), and didn’t enjoy success until reprinted in 1722. They are still sought-after today, and the different titles—including the lives of the great French Captains of his time, of the great foreign Captains, and anecdotes about duels—are often sold independently. The one about duels never came out before 1722. “We don’t know who was the true publisher of Discours sur les Duels,” stated the Notice sur Brantôme (Paris, 1824). “So many reprints appeared in its wake that it would be hard, but also useless, to name them all. Several bear the false indication Chez Jean Sambix (2), including the first one of 1722, which is well-printed.”

 

Brantôme “wrote just like he spoke,” once said a writer; as a matter of fact, his style is suffocating. The volume about duels features no chapters, no titles. From top to bottom, it is laid on paper like one long breath. But it’s stuffed with incredible details and thrilling anecdotes. “No matter the disorder of his writings,” confessed Anquetil in the 18th century, “Brantôme’s book pleases, because it’s entertaining.” As a matter of fact, this book is a breath-taking reading featuring fierce people cutting each other’s throat over matters of honour that sometimes seem so ridiculous that we hardly believe one could die over them. And yet.

 

Two bulls in a pen

 

Until 1546, duels took place in a camp clos, or closed pen—usually located in a churchyard. In the 9th century, Pope Nicolas I considered duels as legitimate and lawful, and many religious got involved—when necessary, they hired the arms of fighters to represent their church. In the early 14th century, the French king Philippe le Bel ordered the pens to be 40 feet wide and 80 feet long. As stated by Brantôme about the duel that cost the life of Don Alonzo, in Italy—defeated by the famous Bayard—, the pens were often “simply bounded by some piles of big stones.” He who stepped outside the limits had lost. The ceremonial was quite complex and the fighters were expected to ride from their places, with “any reasonable offensive and defensive weapon” carried before them by their kinsmen. Upon reaching the pen, they swore on the crucifix and on the holiness of baptism that they considered to be in their own right. Then the fight started, usually in front of a consequent audience. Duels were barbaric in the way that the winner could dispose at will of the loser—be he dead or alive! Not only did you lose your quarrel when defeated, but you also lost all your goods, your life and your spiritual salvation, as the law adapted from the Lombards’ made it clear that a loser couldn’t be given a Christian burial; “just like an Arab or a Sarasin,” deplored Brantôme. “How cruel!” But you were lucky if you died on the battlefield; because if you survived your wounds, you became less than a beast in the hands of the winner. “He had the right to drag you all through the pen (a jolly idea deriving for the sane reading of Homer’s Iliad, editor’s note), to hang you, burn you, to hold you prisoner,” enumerated Brantôme. “In a word, he could treat you worse than a slave.” But in 1547, a tricky fight put an official end to duels.

 

The trick of Jarnac

 

The last duel officially authorized by the King of France took place on July 10, 1547; and it opposed two friends, namely Gui Chabot de Jarnac and François Vivonne de la Châtaigneraie. It all started the day the former boasted of having sex with his mother-in-law to the latter, who repeated it to François I; the King later teased Jarnac, who firmly denied, and demanded justice—but François I opposed the duel. A few months after the King’s death, Henri II gave them the permission, as La Châtaigneraie was his favourite. Several thousands of people gathered the said day on the terrace of the castle of Saint-Germain, near Paris. Five hundred men supported La Châtaigneraie, all wearing his colours—white and rosy pink; Jarnac had 100 men with him, all dressed in black and white. Nobody expected Jarnac to win this fight; indeed, although smaller and younger than his friend, La Châtaigneraie was “one of the strongest and the most skilful gentlemen of France with any weapon; and there was no better wrestler in the kingdom,” wrote his nephew Brantôme. But Jarnac teamed up with a clever master of arms, Captain Caize, who imposed many constraints to La Châtaigneraie. First, he insisted that both fighters should carry a specific shield that restrained the mobility of the left arm; “this was of great disadvantage to my uncle,” wrote Brantome, “who was still recovering from a shot of harquebuse received in his right arm during the assault of the city of Cony, in Piémont.” The Judges of the pen didn’t oppose this constraint; neither did the relatives of La Chataigneraie, who were probably overconfident “in the bold courage of my uncle.” (Brantôme) Then, as he had the choice of arms, Jarnac asked his opponent to equip himself with “more than thirty different weapons; he imposed various horses, such as steeds, Turkish, Barb horses, (...) all harnessed in various fashions (...). He did it to take his enemy by surprise, but also to force him to spend a lot of money.” As a matter of fact, the King had to support La Châtegneraie so he could attend the fight with all the required equipment. And the duelist publicly complained that Jarnac was trying to fight him both “spiritually and financially.”

 

Nonetheless, the duel took place, and despite being feverish, Jarnac was ready. Most duelists aimed at the head or chest of their opponent, but Jarnac acted in a different way. Thanks to a skilful bout he had practiced with Captain Caize, he wounded La Châtaigneraie a little above the left knee. He did it twice in a row, eventually forcing the King to throw his baton; this gesture instantly put an end to the fight—should any fighter hit after that, he would immediately be put to death. “The Jarnac’s trick has now became an adage,” underlines the Dictionary of Feller (Liège, 1790). “It is used to describe a trick, or an unexpected response from an opponent.” The King intervened, yes; “but too late,” deplored Brantôme. Indeed, his cousin was badly hurt—but mostly in his pride. He refused to have his wound correctly bandaged, and died from it a few days later. Though all parties agreed to declare that it had been a fair duel, “Henry II was so mortified that he solemnly swore he would never permit any more duel,” stated L’Esprit de l’Encyclopédie. But men of honour were stubborn, and a few days later, two soldier friends had a fight in Piémont simply because the first one couldn’t believe what the second one was telling him about the circumstances La Châtaigneraie’s death—“both of them ended up seriously wounded,” underlined Brantôme. This was a foretelling fight. Indeed, the ban on duels curiously made them more frequent.

 

Combatere a la mazza

 

The successors of Henri II all reinforced the laws against duels, and the Council of Trent made it clear that the Church no longer supported this custom: “If an Emperor, King or any other Prince or Lord, enables some Christians to fight a duel on his lands, he shall be excommunicated and deprived of his lordship,” read L’Histoire du Concile de Trente (Pierre Chouët, 1635). The same treatment was to be applied to “those who advise the duelists”, and to “the mere spectators”. Notwithstanding this dreadful warning, duels grew more numerous, especially in France where the King never ratified the Council of Trent. Mr de Saintfoix had an explanation: “Before that, upon fighting surreptitiously, a man lost his honour, and was considered a petty murderer. Furthermore, when officially asking for a duel, he informed of his quarrel; and people around him always tried to end it in a peaceful way. The man who was wrong was also necessarily impressed at the oath he had to take before the fight; and you had no choice but to win or die without honour.” Less regulated, duels flourished as duelists started to call each other at la mazza—in the open field. According to Brantôme, this new form of duel originated in Naples, Italy, where “people started to call each other outside the cities, in the fields, in the forests or among hedges and bushes—hence the expression “combatere a la mazza.” The beginning of the end for the learnt theorists, who unanimously condemned this new savage way—mainly, stated Brantôme, because it meant fighting without protection, “like gross beasts”. Things even got worse as the witnesses started to wonder: What are we doing while our friends are fighting? Let’s fight as well! Thus, duels became pitched battles! And all these people killed each other “for the pleasure rather than out of animosity” (Brantôme). The winner ran a penalty risk, but was usually granted a complacent royal pardon—Henry IV issued more seven thousands in less than 18 years. That’s probably why Mr Feller wrote, in 1791: “These duels between individuals (at la mazza, editor’s note) have shed more blood in the last two hundred years, than the duels in closed pens since their origins.” It looks like people were wholeheartedly cutting each other’s throat at the slightest remark, fearing no danger, and standing as true heralds of honour in a world long disappeared. Yet, throughout Brantôme’s book, it seems that man has been man ever since David slew Goliath in a duel; and that when it comes to defend one’s life, all is fair.

 

Gentle Merciful Men

 

Duels might have taken place in the Bush, they still obeyed complex and unwritten rules. For instance, suppose you decided to spare your enemy’s life once he was at your mercy. What were the proper words to utter on such an occasion? Brantôme seriously reasoned about the matter. “To say “Ask for mercy and I’ll spare you!” or “Beg for your life, and I won’t kill you!” is a terrible thing to do, as no man of heart will ever accept to utter them, and would rather suffer a hundred deaths.” Really and truly, it was nicer “to gently and gracefully spare your opponent’s life.” Some went as far as pretending to be wounded, to belittle the shame of their victim. It happened, reported Brantôme, with two Captains in Piémont. The first one wounded the second one and decided to let him live, as both men were friends. But the defeated soldier asked another favour, probably as important as life to him: “Please, be merciful all the way, and wear a bandage for a few days, so it won’t be said that I was wounded without wounding.”

 

But “too good, too dumb”, goes the French saying; and a hold hand at duels such as Matas should have known better than to leave his opponent unarmed after he had disarmed him in the Bois de Vincennes in the late 16th century. “You can go, young man,” he said. “And learn to hold your sword firmly, and not to attack a man like me; go away, I forgive you.” But as he was mounting his horse, the young man took up his arm, ran to him, “and pierced him to death on the spot.” (Brantôme) Matas was mourned, and blamed for his lack of foresight. Other duelists, especially the Italians—the most cruel, said Brantôme—, left a mark on the face of their victims, or left them lying on the ground, half-dead and, ideally, definitely maimed; thus they could neither retaliate nor deny their defeat—as most of these duels took place without witnesses, the two versions of the same fight often varied. After all, honour and precaution can go together, cant’ they? Well, let’s put it straight: when it comes to fight for your life, honour comes second—even when you fight over it.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “America the Beautiful”
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington, Tongue-in-Cheek, Writes James McHenry About His Wife or Mistress—But Funding the Continental Army is the Real Topic
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Young’s Map of the United States
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> President Lincoln & His Most Profitable Client, the Illinois Central Railroad
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Thanks Former Pro-Slavery and Newly Republican Congressman for a Fiery Anti-Slavery Speech at a Philadelphia Campaign Rally
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “A Visit From St. Nicholas” - great association copy inscribed by Clement C. Moore
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Einstein Agrees to Allow “a Short Book on the Hydrogen Bomb” to Use His Statement Made on Eleanor Roosevelt’s TV Show
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The Building Blocks of Albert Einstein’s Creative Mind
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> A Unique Manuscript Map of Block Island Sound Including Fisher’s and Gardiner’s Islands, the Hamptons, and Montauk Point
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> J.R.R. Tolkien Writes his Proofreader with a Lengthy Discussion of the Lord of the Rings, Including Criticism of Radio Broadcasts of his Work
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Six Benjamin Franklin Signed Receipts – Including his Earliest Obtainable Autograph — Acknowledging a Donation to the Famous Library Company He Founded, and Five Payments for His Pennsylvania Gazette
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Sherman Dishes on Lincoln & Thomas, Meade, Sheridan, Halleck & Grant
  • <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. June 7 New York<br>June 14 London. Accepting consignments</b>
    <b>Bonhams Jun 7:</b> Sangorski & Sutcliffe: Jewelled Binding. Byron, Lord [George Gordon]. An illuminated manuscript on vellum, being Byron's Ode to Napoleon. $40,000 - 60,000.
    <b>Sold at Bonhams:</b> Smith (Adam). <i>An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations</i>, 2 vol., first edition, W. Strahan, and T. Cadell, 1776. Sold for £68,750.
    <b>Sold at Bonhams:</b> Fleming (Ian). <i>Casino Royale</i>, first edition, first impression, Jonathan Cape, [1953]. Sold for £20,000
    <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. June 7 New York<br>June 14 London. Accepting consignments</b>
    <b>Sold at Bonhams:</b> Orwell (George). <i>Keep the Aspidistra Flying</i>, first edition, author's presentation copy, inscribed <i>"To, F.G. Westrope, with very best wishes, from, 'George Orwell'"</i><br>1936. Sold for £22,500
    <b>Sold at Bonhams:</b> Prout (Victor Albert). The Thames from London to Oxford in Forty Photographs. First [-Second] Series in 1 vol., first edition, Virtue and Company, [1862]. Sold for £16,250
    <b>Sold at Bonhams:</b> Fleming (Alexander). Papers and memorabilia of Sir Alexander Fleming kept by his niece Mary Elizabeth (Anne) Johnston, including a penicillin mould, notebook, photographs and other papers. Sold for £12,500
  • <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions: Sale of Books, Prints and Manuscripts.<br>May 30 – June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> Hobson, R.L. <i>A catalogue of Chinese pottery and porcelain in the collection of Sir Percival David</i> (London, 1934). Est. € 8.000-10.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> Chagall, M. <i>Drawings for the bible</i>. (Paris, 1960). Est. € 1.500-2.500
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> Zwart, P. [N.K.F.]. <i>Delft kabels</i> (Delft, 1933). Est. € 20.000-30.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions: Sale of Books, Prints and Manuscripts.<br>May 30 – June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> Zwart, P. [N.K.F.]. <i>Normalieënboekje</i> (Delft, 1924-1926). Est. € 30.000-50.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> [Russian children's books]. Mayakovsky, V. Kem byt'? (What to be?) (Moscow, 1932). Est. € 500-700
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> [Léger, F.]. Cendrars, B. <i>La Fin du Monde filmée par l'Ange</i> N.-D (Paris, 1919). Est. € 2.000-3.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions: Sale of Books, Prints and Manuscripts.<br>May 30 – June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 31:</b><br>La Roche, E. <i>Indische Baukunst</i> (Munich, 1921-1922). Est. € 3.000-5.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 31:</b> Blume, C.L. <i>Flora Javae nec non insularum adjacentium./ Flora Javae nec non insularum adjacentium </i> (Brussels, 1828). Est. € 7.000-9.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 31:</b> <i>Description de l'Égypte (…) pendant l'expédition de l'armée francaise</i> (Paris, 1820-1829). Est. € 30.000-50.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions: Sale of Books, Prints and Manuscripts.<br>May 30 – June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 31:</b><br>La Fontaine, J. de. <i>Fables choisies, mises en vers </i> (Paris, 1756).<br>Est. € 1.500-2.500
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 31:</b> [VOC and WIC]. Pelsaert, F. <i>Ongeluckige Voyagie, Van 't Schip Batavia, Nae de Oost-Indien</i> (Amsterdam, 1647).<br>Est. € 40.000-60.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions June 2:</b> Goya y Lucientes, F.J. de. <i>La Taureaumachie </i> (Paris, 1876), 40 etchings and aquatints. Est. € 8.000-10.000
  • <b>Now in press: 19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> <i>The First American Magna Carta. English Liberties.</i> Boston, 1721.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Babbage presentation to Peel, the man who killed the Difference Engine 1832
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Stamp Act. 1765
    <b>Now in press: 19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Central Park Photographs by Prevost 1862
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Salem Witch Trials. Wonders of the Invisible World 1693
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Mammoth print of Millie-Christine, "The Carolina Twins" c. 1868
  • <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature & Sporting Collectibles. May 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Joyce (James), An Original Manuscript Page of text from <i>Finnegan’s Wake</i>, the opening of the Anna Livia Plurabelle section. €7,500-10,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Joyce (James), <i>Chamber Music,</i> 1907. First Edition of his First Book, First Issue. €1,500-2,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Lady Gregory’s Copy Signed by W.B. Yeats, Cuala Press: Yeats (W.B.), <i>Poems Written in Discouragement</i>, 1913. Limited to 50 Copies Only. €2,500-4,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature & Sporting Collectibles. May 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> A Twentieth Century Masterpiece: O’Brien (Flann), <i>At Swim-Two-Birds</i>, 8vo, 1939. First Edn. €1,750-2,500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> The Missing Log of the H.M.S. Liffey Manuscript Journal, 1867. €1,500-2,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Exceptionally Rare First Publication: Gregory (Augusta Lady), <i>Over the River: An appeal for aid to a poor parish in South London</i>. 1887. €1,000-1,500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature & Sporting Collectibles. May 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Ex. Rare Irish Broadsheet: An Irish Perspective on the Execution of Louis XVI, 1793 Broadsheet with engraving of the event, headed: “Massacre of the French King.” €500-700
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Original Manuscript Poem, Heaney (Seamus), <i>The Schoolbag</i>. In Memoriam John Hewitt. Signed and dated November 8 1991. €1,000-1,500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Sowerby (J.E.), <i>English Botany; or Coloured Figures of British Plants</i>. Ed. by J.T. Boswell Syme. 10 vols, with 1696 hand-coloured plates. €750-1,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature & Sporting Collectibles. May 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Collection of Signed First Editions incl. Francis (Dick), <i>Nerve</i> (London 1964); <i>For Kicks</i> (London 1965); <i>Forfeit</i> (London 1968). €400-500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Le Carre (John), <i>The Spy who came in from the Cold</i>, 8vo, 1963, First Edn., with author’s signature tipped in on t.p. €350-500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Adams (Richard), <i>Watership Down</i>, 8vo, 1976, First Illustrated Edn., Signed on f.e.p. by Author & Artist, and also signed by Artist on hf. title. €200-300

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