• <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions: Sale of Books, Prints and Manuscripts.<br>May 30 – June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> Hobson, R.L. <i>A catalogue of Chinese pottery and porcelain in the collection of Sir Percival David</i> (London, 1934). Est. € 8.000-10.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> Chagall, M. <i>Drawings for the bible</i>. (Paris, 1960). Est. € 1.500-2.500
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> Zwart, P. [N.K.F.]. <i>Delft kabels</i> (Delft, 1933). Est. € 20.000-30.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions: Sale of Books, Prints and Manuscripts.<br>May 30 – June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> Zwart, P. [N.K.F.]. <i>Normalieënboekje</i> (Delft, 1924-1926). Est. € 30.000-50.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> [Russian children's books]. Mayakovsky, V. Kem byt'? (What to be?) (Moscow, 1932). Est. € 500-700
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 30:</b> [Léger, F.]. Cendrars, B. <i>La Fin du Monde filmée par l'Ange</i> N.-D (Paris, 1919). Est. € 2.000-3.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions: Sale of Books, Prints and Manuscripts.<br>May 30 – June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 31:</b><br>La Roche, E. <i>Indische Baukunst</i> (Munich, 1921-1922). Est. € 3.000-5.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 31:</b> Blume, C.L. <i>Flora Javae nec non insularum adjacentium./ Flora Javae nec non insularum adjacentium </i> (Brussels, 1828). Est. € 7.000-9.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 31:</b> <i>Description de l'Égypte (…) pendant l'expédition de l'armée francaise</i> (Paris, 1820-1829). Est. € 30.000-50.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions: Sale of Books, Prints and Manuscripts.<br>May 30 – June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 31:</b><br>La Fontaine, J. de. <i>Fables choisies, mises en vers </i> (Paris, 1756).<br>Est. € 1.500-2.500
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions May 31:</b> [VOC and WIC]. Pelsaert, F. <i>Ongeluckige Voyagie, Van 't Schip Batavia, Nae de Oost-Indien</i> (Amsterdam, 1647).<br>Est. € 40.000-60.000
    <b>Bubb Kuyper Auctions June 2:</b> Goya y Lucientes, F.J. de. <i>La Taureaumachie </i> (Paris, 1876), 40 etchings and aquatints. Est. € 8.000-10.000
  • <b>Forum Auctions: Important Books & Manuscripts. May 24, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Columnis (Guido de). <i>Historia destructionis Troiae</i>, first edition, 1477-79.<br>Est. £30,000 - 40,000
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Modus versificando. Extraordinary sammelband of 21 works collected by a German humanist, 1492-1519. Est. £40,000 - 60,000
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Mary I & King Philip II. Letter signed to Lord Paget signed "Mary the Quene" and "Philipp R" and endorsed "By the King and the Quene", 1p., Westminster, 29th January 1555.<br>Est. £18,000 - 20,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Important Books & Manuscripts. May 24, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Pontanus (Ludovicus). <i>Singularia</i>, Lyon, 1517. Est. £4,000 - 6,000
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Greene (Graham). <i>The Confidential Agent</i>, first edition, 1939. Est. £1,500 - 2,000
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Dodgson (Rev. C.L.). <i>The Hunting of the the Snark</i>, presentation copy inscribed by the author, 1876. Est. £2,500 - 3,500
    <b>Forum Auctions: Important Books & Manuscripts. May 24, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Bacon (Sir Francis). <i>The Tvvoo Bookes of Francis Bacon</i>, first edition, 1605. Est. £1,000 - 1,500
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Metcalf (John Henry). <i>Armorial Sketches</i>, manuscript 1850. Est. £2,000 - 3,000
    <b>Forum Auctions May 24:</b> Firdausi (Abu'l-Qasim). <i>Shahnama [The Book of Kings]</i>, with 20 minaitures, probably Kashmir, [late 18th/early 19th century]. Est. £2,000 - 3,000
  • <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. June 7 New York<br>June 14 London. Accepting consignments</b>
    <b>Bonhams Jun 7:</b> Sangorski & Sutcliffe: Jewelled Binding. Byron, Lord [George Gordon]. An illuminated manuscript on vellum, being Byron's Ode to Napoleon. $40,000 - 60,000.
    <b>Sold at Bonhams:</b> Smith (Adam). <i>An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations</i>, 2 vol., first edition, W. Strahan, and T. Cadell, 1776. Sold for £68,750.
    <b>Sold at Bonhams:</b> Fleming (Ian). <i>Casino Royale</i>, first edition, first impression, Jonathan Cape, [1953]. Sold for £20,000
    <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. June 7 New York<br>June 14 London. Accepting consignments</b>
    <b>Sold at Bonhams:</b> Orwell (George). <i>Keep the Aspidistra Flying</i>, first edition, author's presentation copy, inscribed <i>"To, F.G. Westrope, with very best wishes, from, 'George Orwell'"</i><br>1936. Sold for £22,500
    <b>Sold at Bonhams:</b> Prout (Victor Albert). The Thames from London to Oxford in Forty Photographs. First [-Second] Series in 1 vol., first edition, Virtue and Company, [1862]. Sold for £16,250
    <b>Sold at Bonhams:</b> Fleming (Alexander). Papers and memorabilia of Sir Alexander Fleming kept by his niece Mary Elizabeth (Anne) Johnston, including a penicillin mould, notebook, photographs and other papers. Sold for £12,500
  • <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “America the Beautiful”
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington, Tongue-in-Cheek, Writes James McHenry About His Wife or Mistress—But Funding the Continental Army is the Real Topic
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Young’s Map of the United States
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> President Lincoln & His Most Profitable Client, the Illinois Central Railroad
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Thanks Former Pro-Slavery and Newly Republican Congressman for a Fiery Anti-Slavery Speech at a Philadelphia Campaign Rally
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “A Visit From St. Nicholas” - great association copy inscribed by Clement C. Moore
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Einstein Agrees to Allow “a Short Book on the Hydrogen Bomb” to Use His Statement Made on Eleanor Roosevelt’s TV Show
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The Building Blocks of Albert Einstein’s Creative Mind
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> A Unique Manuscript Map of Block Island Sound Including Fisher’s and Gardiner’s Islands, the Hamptons, and Montauk Point
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> J.R.R. Tolkien Writes his Proofreader with a Lengthy Discussion of the Lord of the Rings, Including Criticism of Radio Broadcasts of his Work
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Six Benjamin Franklin Signed Receipts – Including his Earliest Obtainable Autograph — Acknowledging a Donation to the Famous Library Company He Founded, and Five Payments for His Pennsylvania Gazette
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Sherman Dishes on Lincoln & Thomas, Meade, Sheridan, Halleck & Grant

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - July - 2014 Issue

The Bookseller's Dilemma: the world is changing

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Collectors: a committed older audience

The Bookseller’s dilemma: the world is changing

 

Problems in bookselling have long been understood.  Shops closing, books going online, loss of face-to-face contact, rising quantities, aging dealers, fewer new dealers and changing collecting perspectives are all factors in a once sedentary field that now evolves in real time.  In effect, the old world has become old hat and a disappearing hat at that.

 

Some fifteen years ago, a few dealers, sensing that the long-term impact of exponentially rising online book listings would eventually alter valuations negatively, began to adjust and reduce inventories.  Online listings and prices nevertheless continued to increase, with prices declining significantly only after the financial collapse of 2008.  As late as 2007, these concerns seemed overblown among the many who believed declining prices were a cyclical problem that would disappear with the next economic recovery.  But then came 2008, the watershed year that saw dealer cash flows and personal net worth broadly reduced by the Wall Street meltdown.

 

This decline coincided with the realization that the flow of material onto the net would continue even in the face of increasing competition and declining prices.  The cause?  Diminishing alternatives for selling and the easy ability to list.  Anyone could offer and, in time, it seemed almost everyone did.

 

For the prospective buyer, the rising volume and flexibility of emerging mega-databases such as Amazon and Abe Books provided fair approximations of the long sought “world wide search,” that is the single search that sees almost every copy everywhere.  These databases also provided new opportunities to see that some old books are very common, others rare, and some very overpriced.

 

Easily identified, illogical pricing lead to comparisons with auction realizations, and from these comparisons trends emerged.  Valuable and important material, according to the auction records, continued to be strong, but not outlandish, while the less wanted and less rare material generally weakened.  For the best material, as would be expected, online listings firmed while for the less expensive material that underperformed at auction, prices generally held to their pre-2008 asking prices.  The consequence of the increasing divergence between the best and the more mundane was that the serious book buying audience became more open to buying at auctions, from an estimated 10% of the rare book buying audience ten years ago to roughly 30% today, building an audience large enough to support increases in the number of auction houses, the number of sales and the number of lots – to the point where today auction volume is constant enough to support daily searches with the expectation of regularly finding appealing material.

 

For listing sites, the increasingly illogically high listing prices for mid- and lower-level material raised significant issues about listing site credibility.  If, on the one hand, you have moderating prices in the auction rooms and much higher prices for the same material online, it becomes easier, even incumbent, on prospective buyers to try the auction route.  Interestingly, most buyers have for years expressed a preference to buy from dealers, but there is an apparent limit to the listing site – auction price spread, and during the past 5 years, it was temporarily breached.  The challenge for dealers and listing sites then has become reducing that difference given a large spread makes the auctions look attractive.  Logically, this shouldn’t be difficult.  Auction prices, which for years fell, recovered 7% last year and, if such increases continue, they’ll once again make the listing sites competitive.

 

Dealers, of course, are also free to reduce prices, but in practice, if they cut prices only to have others cut theirs, they gain no comparative advantage and may earn the animosity of other sellers.  Alternatively, they can price consistently with other online sellers and potentially find their prices high compared to auction realizations.   For buyers who don’t follow auctions, of course, this is not a problem.  For those that do, and they tend to be the largest buyers, high prices tend to leave a bad impression.  And such impressions matter, for second chances are rare because among buyers it is assumed that dealers employ a consistent logic.  If prices are high in one context there is a tendency to think the dealer’s prices are generally high.  Sellers, it turns out, are auditioning every day and, in my experience, too often think it is only the material that is important.  That is not my experience.

 

For those who sell, telling a book’s story in a compelling way is very important because prospective buyers read descriptions as a way to understand both the material specifically and the dealer generally.  Dealers who do it well over a career develop a gravitas that adds value to the material, a fact we know because their connection to the material will be mentioned in subsequent descriptions and, I believe, aid in the sale.  We are used to regarding collector provenance as important.  Dealer provenance is equally significant. 

 

Getting the price right is obviously crucial.  Some sellers tend to airbrush flaws, better dealers tend to avoid flawed material altogether, but no one buys and sells only perfect copies.  Repair history is not always disclosed, but if asked, the serious seller will usually explain the issues they have dealt with and price the material consistent with its condition.  For the buyer, asking the right questions is important.

 

So where to sell?  By this point, dealers have tried most listing options, but few have found substantial success beyond the largest sites.  Those who have succeeded have been both aggressive and patient.  They can’t make buyers buy, but they can keep buyers from crossing them off their lists.  Ultimately, buyers have to contact dealers, and hopefully, when their paths cross, the offers they receive are compelling.  Today, they have to be.

 

For dealers, this is a substantial adjustment because the number of copies available and auction history now influence prices that were once exclusively set by sellers.    Until a few years ago, prices posted online were primarily determined by the prices of other copies of the same book posted on the same site.  Today, it is more complicated because of the rising percentage of buyers bidding at auction.  In effect, dealers have to have strategies for selling to two different constituencies that are prepared to pay different prices, the traditional book buyer and the auction bidder.  Lots of luck bridging the difference - because if you price high you lose the auction buyer, and if you price to be in a logical relationship to auction prices, you leave margin on the table.

 

Auctions have always been part of the field, but they were, for most of the past 250 years, a dealers’ only market that froze out retail bidders.  Since 1980, auctions have moved into the retail sphere and become competitors with dealers, uneasily coexisting with them since.  Understanding what auctions are selling and their bidding protocols requires concentration and dealers, who when asked, will have plenty of disaster stories to temper auction enthusiasm.  Nevertheless, auction houses have smoothed out their processes.  Variables such as reserves, version and condition skew outcomes, but for many titles there are today a series of auction realizations that together confirm value.  Both American Book Prices Current and the Americana Exchange Database provide extensive auction history.  Dealers currently have no comparable validation for their pricing and, in my view, need one.

 

Many fields, arguably most fields, now employ some pricing calculators and comparisons, their principal purpose being to quell doubts and encourage transactions. In our case, we also provide estimated current value.  This information, I believe, facilitates transactions by confirming importance, rarity and value.

 

Were dealer prices and auction realizations the same, the single variable for dealers would be condition, but dealers routinely price higher.  Our discussions with collectors suggest they expect to pay dealers more, and the threshold of upper valuation seems to be 30%.  When dealer prices move beyond that, as happened over the past five years when auction realizations declined and dealer prices generally held steady, we now know buyers shift their attention to auctions.

 

For evidence of this I look to the number of lots reported on AE over the past decade, those offered and those sold as well as total turnover:

 

Year    Total Lots       Lots Sold         Ave. Price       Median P.       Total Sales

2013   358662          257290          $2,422.00       $328               $623,156,380

2012   310489          221248          $2,803.00       $351               $620,158,144

2011   244840          166903          $2,285.00       $378               $381,373,355

2010   218017          149075          $2,257.00       $339               $336,462,275

2009   207521          139,759         $2,955.00       $376               $412,987,845

2008   220798          156,839         $2,589.00       $384               $406,056,171

2007   204898          153179          $3,476.00       $486               $532,450,204

2006   203330          153310          $2,557.00       $423               $392,013,670

2005   161950          119714          $2,745.00       $420               $328,614,930

2004   114262             86717         $2,965            .00       $413               $257,115,905

 

The trends seem strong and convincing, but I have heard the statement that lot volume was always high but simply unreported.  That, to some extent, is true, but in my view does not explain the scale of the year over year increases that are continuing.  Chief among the sellers are the dealers themselves who are aging and facing both regular year over year cash flow needs and end of career issues.  One way or another, thousands of dealers are going to convert their books, manuscripts, maps and ephemera into cash over the next ten years.  Some material will go to auction.  The vast majority will be sold online, potentially at reduced prices.

 

And some are not waiting.  In Australia, many rare and used book dealers conduct auctions themselves.  It’s tolerated, but not universally accepted by other dealers.  In Canada in the rare book trade, you can be a dealer or an auction house but you cannot be both.  Nevertheless, some do both.  In France, many dealers conduct auctions, but in England they don’t.  Bit by bit, auctions, including eBay, are working their way into the mix.  But for the broad mass of material, auctions are not going to be the important venue.  The listing sites are.

 

There, in single clicks, enormous quantities of listings are sorted in tiny fractions of a second.  It is there that the field will prosper or suffer given that is where acquirers regularly look.  The proof of the listing sites’ success is visible in their pricing for the best of them are not cheap.  For the thousands of dealers that use them, they have to be finding success or they wouldn’t be continuing.

 

Their fees, in some cases, approach traditional auction rates.  Whatever the fees, if business is good, such fees will be less an issue, but for many, the business is difficult.  Sales are sparse, prices low and commissions high.  It would help if listing fees were lower, but to lower them, dealers will need to support an alternative approach, a low cost, high traffic specialist listing site for those who sell printed collectibles.  Such a site could make it easier for collectors to find material and facilitate interaction between buyers and sellers.  Theoretically, the seller would keep close to 100% of the proceeds.  This is a big order, but can be achieved.  The display features also need to be consistently first class, the speed fast, and the ongoing buyer/seller interaction captured in the site records.  In principle, this makes sense; in practice, organizing dealers is like herding cats, except that dealers are more independent.

 

In approaching listings, for dealers, the goal should be to provide entirely transparent offers.  By this I mean a complete history of each listing from first day posted, alternations to price along the way, inquiries and offers made and turned down.  Subsequent transaction prices and later re-listings will add to the unfolding story, in time becoming engrossing reading and compelling information that will clarify why dealer involvement is often very important. 

 

As a case in point, I sold at auction in 2009 and 2010 two collections, one early-printed materials and the other western Americana, and included source, date and price information.  I was rewarded with a wide following and a surfeit of bidders.  Most material was sold without meaningful reserves, and, in my view, provided proof that clear information is a substantial aphrodisiac.  Those two sales raised $7.4 million.  Such history is attractive to buyers and no doubt will help revitalize the field. 

 

But many dealers will be reluctant to be so clear, particularly those long used to obscuring their material’s history, I suspect, to hide markups and sources.  During the modern era, skilled dealers made plenty of money, but today, wading into the age of transparency, I believe they face the need to reintroduce the book history they set aside years ago because its inclusion will enhance salability.  It will also be painful and the more honest, rendering the less organized unable to do it.

 

While we wait for significant long-term changes, there are strategies that are effective in the short term.  Dealers should list on more sites and include more images.  At least some of the listing sites should be structured to send their listings into the search engines.  Dealers should refrain from periodically removing and reloading their inventory because it breaks the links that search engines create to make material searchable on Google and the like.  Those who issue catalogues and are AE members should submit them for review in AE Monthly.

 

And experiment on eBay.  Many have tried and some succeeded.  Buyers run tens of thousands of searches there every day.  Capturing their attention is an art.

 

And be open to blogging.  Few dealers have the stamina to write for years to develop a following.  But it can be worthwhile.

 

In time an alphanumeric identification number that is separately and permanently assigned by a knowledgeable but disinterested third party, possibly a single library, a group of libraries or an association, will be the basis for collectible material to be understood and tracked over time.  An item, once an ID number has been assigned and the item indelibly marked, may disappear from the market and later reappear, its prior history on file to be easily and quickly undated.  Such a system will track material hundreds of years into the future, eliminating much uncertainty and creating a strong intellectual and financial basis for collecting.  The effects will be enormous and continuing.  The transition will require the best minds, the best hearts and probably five years.

 

And can it happen?  Yes, and it should.

 

It will start with a few dealers creating a transparent flow of information.  Some listing sites will cooperate and others won’t.  From the buyer’s perspective, such detailed listings will be magnetic and the books, so enrolled, in time worth appreciably more than comparable unmarked copies, particularly those among the first ten thousand examples to be numbered.  Two or three dealers will not be able to change the world, but fifty very serious dealers and one or more major libraries will.

 

For my part, as a collector, I will support the effort by favoring participating dealers.  As managing partner of AE, we will make our resources available.  Dealers are not an option, they are a necessity.

 

 


Posted On: 2014-07-02 18:44
User Name: tenpound

Interesting ideas, Bruce. And a much more balanced article on the trade than your last one. One question, though: Aren't "moderating prices in the auction rooms" offset by increasingly greedy - now up to 25% - buyer's premiums?


Posted On: 2014-07-03 16:19
User Name: Fattrad1

Bruce,

I believe that most booksellers now view the prices posted on the major listing sights just as they few the view the prices on the stock exchanges.....................constantly changing. The auction market offers the occasional value when bidders fail to show up. You also fail to mention the past bankruptcies of famous auction houses and the other legal problems they have faced.

You are correct about the direction of prices of common or scarce books, but that is merely a function of supply and demand, fewer collectors and more titles coming to market. Oh, I could introduce you to numerous young booksellers under the age of forty, the industry is safe and sound.

Jeff Elfont
Swan's Fine Books - an open shop
Walnut Creek, Ca.


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature & Sporting Collectibles. May 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Joyce (James), An Original Manuscript Page of text from <i>Finnegan’s Wake</i>, the opening of the Anna Livia Plurabelle section. €7,500-10,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Joyce (James), <i>Chamber Music,</i> 1907. First Edition of his First Book, First Issue. €1,500-2,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Lady Gregory’s Copy Signed by W.B. Yeats, Cuala Press: Yeats (W.B.), <i>Poems Written in Discouragement</i>, 1913. Limited to 50 Copies Only. €2,500-4,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature & Sporting Collectibles. May 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> A Twentieth Century Masterpiece: O’Brien (Flann), <i>At Swim-Two-Birds</i>, 8vo, 1939. First Edn. €1,750-2,500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> The Missing Log of the H.M.S. Liffey Manuscript Journal, 1867. €1,500-2,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Exceptionally Rare First Publication: Gregory (Augusta Lady), <i>Over the River: An appeal for aid to a poor parish in South London</i>. 1887. €1,000-1,500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature & Sporting Collectibles. May 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Ex. Rare Irish Broadsheet: An Irish Perspective on the Execution of Louis XVI, 1793 Broadsheet with engraving of the event, headed: “Massacre of the French King.” €500-700
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Original Manuscript Poem, Heaney (Seamus), <i>The Schoolbag</i>. In Memoriam John Hewitt. Signed and dated November 8 1991. €1,000-1,500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Sowerby (J.E.), <i>English Botany; or Coloured Figures of British Plants</i>. Ed. by J.T. Boswell Syme. 10 vols, with 1696 hand-coloured plates. €750-1,000
    <b>Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers: Rare Books, Literature & Sporting Collectibles. May 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Collection of Signed First Editions incl. Francis (Dick), <i>Nerve</i> (London 1964); <i>For Kicks</i> (London 1965); <i>Forfeit</i> (London 1968). €400-500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Le Carre (John), <i>The Spy who came in from the Cold</i>, 8vo, 1963, First Edn., with author’s signature tipped in on t.p. €350-500
    <b>Fonsie Mealy May 30:</b> Adams (Richard), <i>Watership Down</i>, 8vo, 1976, First Illustrated Edn., Signed on f.e.p. by Author & Artist, and also signed by Artist on hf. title. €200-300
  • <b>Sotheby’s London: Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and Continental and Russian Books. May 23, 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s London, May 23:</b> Psalter, in Latin with Middle English Supplements [southern Netherlands (Ghent?), c.1250, and England, 15th century]. £40,000 - 60,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London, May 23:</b> Book of Hours, Use of Rome, in Latin and French [France (Langres or Troyes), c.1480]. £40,000 - 60,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London, May 23:</b> Prayerbook, in Dutch [south-eastern Netherlands (perhaps Saint-Trond), c.1570-80]. £150,000 - 250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London: Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and Continental and Russian Books. May 23, 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s London, May 23:</b> <i>Das New Testament</i> [Translated by Martin Luther]. (Augsburg: Heinrich Steiner, And Peter Aprellen, Parchmenter, 16 February) 1535. £50,000 - 70,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London, May 23:</b> <i>Les Presents Heures Sont A Lusaige De Romme Tout Au Long Sans Riens Requerir.</i> (Paris: Gilles Hardouin For German Hardouin), [Almanac 1520-1525]. £50,000 - 70,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London, May 23:</b> Kepler, Johannes. <i>Prodromus Dissertationum Cosmographicarum, Continens Mysterium Cosmographicum, De Admirabili Proportione Orbium Coelestium...</i> Tübingen: Georg Gruppenbach, 1596. £100,000 - 150,000
  • <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts: Books & Manuscripts Online Auction. May 23 - June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Andrew Wyeth, an archive of 43 unpublished letters. $80,000-120,000 [lot 1106]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Abraham Lincoln, signed document granting pensions to surviving Revolutionary War Veterans, 1865. $60,000-80,000 [lot 1058]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Forlani Map of North America, 1566. $40,000-60,000 [lot 1555]
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts: Books & Manuscripts Online Auction. May 23 - June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> <i>Journal des Dames et des Modes</i>, 1912-1914. $4,000-6,000 [lot 1294]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Book of Hours, Use of Rouen, late 14th Century. $30,000-40,000 [lot 1162]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Schedel, World Map, 1493. $5,000-7,000 [lot 1589]
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts: Books & Manuscripts Online Auction. May 23 - June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Sir Isaac Newton’s copy of <i>Le Grand’s Institutio Philosophiae</i>, 1675. $5,000-7,000 [lot 1308]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Muhammad Mu'min Husaini’s Tuhfat al-Mu'minin, 17th century Persian medical manuscript on paper. $4,000-6,000 [lot 1118]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Persian Calligraphy, an album. $4,000-6,000 [lot 1119]
    <b>Skinner Fine Books & Manuscripts: Books & Manuscripts Online Auction. May 23 - June 2, 2017</b>
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> Edgar Allan Poe, <i>Tales</i>, New York: Wiley & Putnam, 1845. $3,00-5,000 [lot 1361]
    <b>Skinner Auction May 23 - Jun 2:</b> English New Testament, Douay-Rheims, 1582, first edition. $10,000-15,000 [lot 1154]
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b><br>Shaw & Nodder, <i>The Naturalist's Miscellany</i>, complete, London, 1789-1813. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Samuel Baker, <i>A New and Exact Map of the Island of St. Christopher</i>, London, 1753. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Henry Briggs, <i>The North Part of America</i>, London, 1625. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b><br>John James Audubon, <i>Herring Gull</i>, CCXCI, hand-colored plate, London, 1836. $7,000 to $10,000. 
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Montanus & Ogilby, <i>America: Being the Latest, and Most Accurate Description of the New World</i>, London, 1671. $10,000 to $15,000. 
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Robert Cruikshank, portfolio of 25 watercolors, London, 1830s. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Group of 55 French watercolors depicting the life and deeds of Napoleon, 1800s. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Aaron & Samuel Arrowsmith, <i>Chart of the Sandwich Islands</i>, London, 1830. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Herman Moll, <i>A New and Exact Map of the Dominions of the King of Great Britain</i>, London, 1735. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7: Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Jacques-Nicolas Bellin,<i> L'Hydrographie Françoise</i>, Paris, circa 1770. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres, <i>Charlestown the Capital of South Carolina</i>, London, 1780. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Jun 7:</b> Arnold Colom, <i>Pascaarte van Nieu Nederlandt</i>, Amsterdam, circa 1658. $7,000 to $10,000.
  • <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés in association with Sotheby’s: La bibliothèque de Pierre Bergé - Music and Poetry. 28 June 2017
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in association with Sotheby’s, June 28:</b> Jean de Lassus. Songs and madrigals. Album of three collections of secular music for tenor. Est: 15,000-20,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Richard Wagner. <i>Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg</i> [Booklet annotated by Wagner]. Original edition, corrected and annotated by Wagner.<br>Est: 60,000-80,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Claude Debussy. <i>La Damoiselle élue</i>. Lyric poem, after Rossetti. Limited ed of 160 copies: #98 of 125 on white vellum. Cover w/famous lithograph by Maurice Denis. Est: 6,000-8,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés in association with Sotheby’s: La bibliothèque de Pierre Bergé - Music and Poetry. 28 June 2017
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Stéphane Mallarmé. <i>A Throw of the Dice Will Never Abolish Chance</i>. Corrected proofs. With autograph documents and lithographs by Redon.<br>Est: 10,000-15,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Henri Sauguet. <i>Les Forains</i>. Ballet. Reduction for piano. Paris, Rouart, Lerolle & Cie, 1946. Binding of the time. Original edition.<br>Est: 20,000-30,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Athanasius Kircher. <i>Musurgia Universalis sive Ars Magna Consoni et Dissoni in X. Libros digesta</i>. Rare original edition of the first musical encyclopedia.<br>Est: 30,000-40,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés in association with Sotheby’s: La bibliothèque de Pierre Bergé - Music and Poetry. 28 June 2017
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> François Villon & Clément Marot. <i>Les Œuvres de Françoys Villon de Paris</i>, reviewed and delivered in their entirety by Clement Marot, valet de chambre of the Roy. Est: 15,000-20,000
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Rainer Maria Rilke. <i>Larenopfer</i> (Offering to the Lares gods). Original edition. The second collection of Rainer Maria Rilke, containing ninety poems.<br>Est: 6,000-8,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Frédéric Chopin. <i>Scherzo for piano</i>, Paris, 1837. Exceptional score with authograph to his virtuoso student Jeanne Porte. Est: 15,000-20,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés in association with Sotheby’s: La bibliothèque de Pierre Bergé - Music and Poetry. 28 June 2017
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Paul Éluard. <i>Capitale de la douleur.</i> One the most beautiful poetic collections from the 1st surrealist wave, bearing an autograph by the author to Coco Chanel. Est: 15,000-20,000 €
    <b>Pierre Bergé and Associés, in assoc. with Sotheby’s, Jun 28:</b> Pierre de Ronsard. <i>Les Amours... </i> newly augmented by the author, and commented by Marc Antoine de Muret. Plus a few Odes from the author, not yet printed.<br>Est: 40,000-60,000 €
  • <b>Now in press: 19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> <i>The First American Magna Carta. English Liberties.</i> Boston, 1721.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Babbage presentation to Peel, the man who killed the Difference Engine 1832
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Stamp Act. 1765
    <b>Now in press: 19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Central Park Photographs by Prevost 1862
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Salem Witch Trials. Wonders of the Invisible World 1693
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Mammoth print of Millie-Christine, "The Carolina Twins" c. 1868

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