• <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Leaves from<br>George Washington's Own Draft <br>of His first Inaugural Address. An Extraordinary Rarity!
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Tyler 1818 - First Print with Facsimile Signatures.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Contress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Emanuel Leutze. Silk Flag Banner designed by Leutze, created by Tiffany & Co., and presented to Gen. John A. Dix, 1864.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The "greatest of early American maps … a masterpiece" (Corcoran). Thomas Holme.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Summons His Cabinet for a Historic Meeting to Discuss Compensated Emancipation.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Albert Einstein. Autograph Letter Signed. Einstein Counsels His Son ... Meaning of Life.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Normal Rockwell. Painting/Drawing Signed. Rockwell's "Barbeshop Quartet", 1936.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Frederick Douglass. Autograph Letter Signed to unknown correspondent. Washington, D.C.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Harry Truman. Autograph Manuscript Notebook for Kansas City Law School Night Class.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Robert E. Lee. Autograph Letter Signed, June 11, 1782. Hours after the Battle of Culpeper Court House, Lee Escapes Again.
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington. Letter Signed, as Commander-in-Chief, Continental Army, to Elias Dayton, Headquarters, [Newburgh, N.Y.], June 11, 1782.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, Chicago, 1968). <i>Collection of papers of John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, concerning the convention</i>. Various places, 1968.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (ARMSTRONG, NEIL.) VERNE, JULES. <i>A Trip to the Moon.</i> New York: F. M. Lupton, September 9, 1893. Signed by Neil Armstrong, first man to walk on the moon.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> KEY, FRANCIS SCOTT. <i>A Celebrated Patriotic Song, the Star Spangled Banner.</i> 1814.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> [COLUMBUS, CHRISTOPHER, Amerigo Vespucci ..] Bernardus Albingaunensis .. Dialogo nuperrime edito Genue in 1512.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (WATKINS, TABER &c.). <i>An album of 32 photographs of the Yosemite and American West Various places</i>, c. 1890s
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (BATTLE OF CONCORD.) <i>Powder horn used by Minuteman Oliver Buttrick at the Battle of Concord</i>, April 19, 1775.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> (CIVIL WAR.) <i>An Extraordinary Confederate Photograph and Autograph Album of Dr. R. L. C. White</i>, 125 original mounted salt prints. 1859-61.
  • <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WARREN, JOSEPH. Letter Signed ("Jos Warren") as Chairman of the Committee of Safety. Cambridge, MA, June 4, 1775.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> WHITMAN, WALT. Leaves of Grass. Brooklyn, NY: [for the Author], 1855.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> JEFFERSON, THOMAS. Printed Broadside Signed ("Th: Jefferson") as Secretary of State. Philadelphia, February 12, 1793.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> CELLINI, BENVENUTO. 1500-1571. Autograph Letter Signed ("Beto. Cellini"). [Florence, c.1566].
    <b>Bonhams: Fine Books and Manuscripts. Sept. 21, 2016</b>
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> NAPOLEON BONAPARTE. Autograph Manuscript. [c.1795].
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> DICKENS, CHARLES. Great Expectations. London: Chapman and Hall, 1861.
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> REED, JOHN. To the Honourable House of Representatives of the Freemen of Pennsylvania this Map of the City and Liberties of Phiadelphia With the Catalog of Purchasers is Humbly Dedicated.... [Philadelphia]: engraved by James Smit
    <b>Bonhams Sept. 21:</b> ELIOT, THOMAS STEARNS. The Waste Land. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1922.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - March - 2014 Issue

Making Translations Easier

Ba6644e7-79aa-4cf7-9947-5df51d57f9c3

Before and after – click the “Translate” button at the top to translate text.

The Americana Exchange is the world's greatest source for listings and results from auctions in the field of books, ephemera, and works on paper. This site tracks over 150 auction houses, posts listings before the sale, and posts results afterward. Listings can be readily found by keyword via the site's search engine. These services are offered free. Paid subscribers also gain access to the AE Database, containing over 5 million records, mostly from past auctions, from a few days to over a century old.

 

Those familiar with this site will also know that “Americana” is a misnomer, a name left over from another time. The site tracks auctions all over the world. Auctions followed aren't limited to the English-speaking world, though auctions are tracked from the U.S., England, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, and South Africa. Other auctions followed come from lands where other languages are spoken – France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Denmark, Austria, Spain, Belgium, and Mexico. Most of the listings at these auctions, and some in English-speaking lands as well, are not written in English. However, descriptions of these lots may be of interest to you. Researchers using the AE Database, in particular, may need to understand the descriptions. This won't be easy if you do not speak the language.

 

This brings us to one of those wonders of modern technology – Google Translate. It isn't perfect. Indeed, it isn't. Nonetheless, it can usually manage to be decent. Considering what it has to do, it can be downright amazing. More often than not, you will come away with a reasonable understanding of what is being said.

 

I have used it for years, and for years I have opened up the Google Translate page in a separate window, copied entries from the AE Database or auction listings, and pasted them on the Google page. It is a bit of a nuisance, particularly if you are looking through a lot of listings.

 

A while back, Google updated its Chrome browser to provide this option automatically. It saves a lot of time. The option to translate is right there when you go to the listings. Click a button and it's done. No copying, no pasting.

 

However, you do need to use the Chrome browser. I have long used Firefox myself, and Internet Explorer is still the most popular browser. Nonetheless, if you are looking for convenience in translating auction listings, or anything else for that matter, this is one time when using Google Chrome is a definite plus. It will save you much time. The same applies if you are visiting websites in another language. The ability to translate on the spot is very handy.

 

Google can usually figure out what the language is you wish to translate. If not, it is easy enough to choose. Now Google is not perfect. Sometimes it does not realize the listing is in a language foreign to you. You may have to go to the Google Translate page if it can't figure this out. Sometimes listings are written in multiple languages, and this can throw Google off. However, I find that most of the time Google recognizes it is a different language, knows which language it is, and offers the option to translate it. Technology is wonderful.

 

To download the Google Chrome browser, click the following link: www.google.com/chrome


Posted On: 2014-03-01 22:22
User Name: kenpa

Michael- What listings are you talking about? And what do you click on for translations. Sorry, I just can't seem to locate it.
Kenny


Posted On: 2014-03-01 23:19
User Name: AE244155

Kenny,

I was specifically discussing listings in the AE Bibliographic Database, but this applies to any page on any site. Most people are familiar with Google Translate, where you copy text, paste it into Google Translate, and then translate it. But, with Google's Chrome browser, that often isn't necessary. If you click on the image with this article, it will enlarge enough to read it. It is an individual record from the AE Database in German, reached with Google Chrome. On the left, at the top of the page, you will see that Google has asked whether you want to translate the page. On the right, you see the result if you click "translate." Chrome will do this automatically with any page in a foreign language. Sometimes it doesn't give you the option, which I think reflects it not being sure what the language is, but usually it gives you the option to translate at the top, and with one click you can convert it to English (or something like English) or whatever other language you prefer.

Mike


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Announcing the Fall 2016 Auction Season
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 1:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 18:</b> Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 10:</b> 19th & 20th Century Literature
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 8:</b> Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Colored Plate Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 17:</b> Printed & Manuscript Americana
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 1:</b> Art, Press & Illustrated Books
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 29:</b> Illustration Art
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 3:</b> Old Master Through Modern Prints

Article Search

Archived Articles

Ask Questions