• <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “America the Beautiful”
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> George Washington, Tongue-in-Cheek, Writes James McHenry About His Wife or Mistress—But Funding the Continental Army is the Real Topic
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Young’s Map of the United States
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> President Lincoln & His Most Profitable Client, the Illinois Central Railroad
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Lincoln Thanks Former Pro-Slavery and Newly Republican Congressman for a Fiery Anti-Slavery Speech at a Philadelphia Campaign Rally
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> “A Visit From St. Nicholas” - great association copy inscribed by Clement C. Moore
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Einstein Agrees to Allow “a Short Book on the Hydrogen Bomb” to Use His Statement Made on Eleanor Roosevelt’s TV Show
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> The Building Blocks of Albert Einstein’s Creative Mind
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> A Unique Manuscript Map of Block Island Sound Including Fisher’s and Gardiner’s Islands, the Hamptons, and Montauk Point
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> J.R.R. Tolkien Writes his Proofreader with a Lengthy Discussion of the Lord of the Rings, Including Criticism of Radio Broadcasts of his Work
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Six Benjamin Franklin Signed Receipts – Including his Earliest Obtainable Autograph — Acknowledging a Donation to the Famous Library Company He Founded, and Five Payments for His Pennsylvania Gazette
    <b>Seth Kaller:</b> Sherman Dishes on Lincoln & Thomas, Meade, Sheridan, Halleck & Grant
  • <b>Bonhams, March 9. Fine Books and Manuscripts, Including the Kennedy Years</b>
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> BROWNING, ELIZABETH BARRETT. Autograph Manuscript Initialed ("E.B.B."), being the working notebook for the poems contained in <i>The Seraphim and Other Poems</i>. $400,000 to 600,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> WILDE, OSCAR. Two leaves, pp 31-34, from the first appearance of <i>The Picture of Dorian Gray in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine for July, 1890</i>, with Wilde's autograph revisions. $40,000 to 60,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>Comedies, Histories and Tragedies; Published according to the true Originall Copies. Second Impression. [THE SECOND FOLIO.]</i> $200,000 to 300,000
    <b>Bonhams, March 9. Fine Books and Manuscripts, Including the Kennedy Years</b>
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> KENNEDY, JOHN FITZGERALD. Photograph Signed ("John F. Kennedy") and Inscribed, 8 x 10 inch gelatin silver print, of Senator Kennedy and Miss Barelli, at the swearing of the secretarial oath for Miss Barelli. $1,200 to 1,800
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> COOPER, JAMES FENIMORE. Autograph Manuscript, being Chapter XXVII of <i>Afloat and Ashore</i>. $15,000 to 20,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> IRVING, WASHINGTON. Autograph Manuscript, being Chapter 20 from Volume IV of <i>The Life of George Washington</i>. $20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Bonhams, March 9. Fine Books and Manuscripts, Including the Kennedy Years</b>
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> VERNE, JULES. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("Jules Verne"), being the complete short story "<i>Une fantaisie de docteur Ox</i>". $100,000 to 150,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> ALCHEMY. <i>[The Crowning of Nature, or Coronatio Naturae.]</i> Original alchemical manuscript on paper, ruled in red, with watermark of the arms of Schieland. $100,000 to 150,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> DE JODE, CORNELUS. 1568 - 1600. <i>Quivirae Regnu, Cum Alija Versus Borea</i>. [Antwerp: Arnoldum Coninx, 1593]. $7,000 to 10,000
    <b>Bonhams, March 9. Fine Books and Manuscripts, Including the Kennedy Years</b>
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> HOOKER, JOSEPH DALTON. <i>The Rhododendrons of Sikkim-Himalaya; Being an Account, Botanical and Geographical, of the Rhododendrons Recently Discovered in the Mountains of Eastern Himalaya</i>… $7,000 to 10,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> CATLIN, GEORGE. <i>North American Indian Portfolio. Hunting scenes and amusements of the Rocky Mountains and prairies of America. From drawings and notes of the author, made during eight years' travel.</i> $20,000 to 30,000
    <b>Bonhams Mar. 9:</b> LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. HESLER, ALEXANDER. Platinum print, 8 3/4 x 6 3/4 in, of a beardless Lincoln, 1860.<br>$2,000 to 3,000
  • <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> THE PAPERS OF BREVET MAJOR GENERAL JOHN GROSS BARNARD (1815-1882), Chief Engineer of the Army of the Potomac. Estimate: $75,000-100,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> ALVIN LANGDON COBURN. London. With 20 photogravures by Coburn and text by Hilaire Belloc, London and New York: 1909. First edition. Est: $4,000-6,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> WILLIAM FADEN, A Plan of New York Island, with part of Long Island, Staten Island & East New Jersey. London: 1776. Estimate: $5,000-8,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> MAX BEERBOHM, Lord Curzon delivering an oration. Original drawing with collage. London, 1912. Est: $2,000-3,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> AMERICAN REVOLUTION, Recueil des Loix Constitutives des Colonies Angloises. A Philadelphie, et se vend a Paris: Cellot & Jombert, 1778. First collected edition in French. Estimate: $500-800
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, Confederate General Joseph Johnston's copy of Sherman's General Orders No. 65 announcing the final agreement of Surrender, 27 April 1865. Est: $4,000-6,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> JOHN KEATS, Lamia, Isabella, the Eve of Saint Agnes and Other Poems. London: Taylor and Hessey, 1820. First edition of Keats’s third book.. Estimate: $5,000-7,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> M. T. Cicero's Cato Major, or his discourse of Old-age: With Explanatory Notes. Philadelphia: Benjamin Franklin, 1744. Est: $5,000-8,000
    <b>Doyle, Apr. 26:</b> WINSTON S CHURCHILL, History of the English Speaking Peoples. London: Cassell, 1956-58. First editions. Est: $1,500-2,500
  • <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. March 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Potter (Beatrix). The Tale of Peter Rabbit, first edition, first issue, [1901]. Part of an extensive, private Beatrix Potter collection. £15,000 - 20,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Dodgson (Charles Lutwidge). The Hunting of the Snark, first edition, with original printed dust-jacket, 1876.<br>£7,000 - 9,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Buckland Wright (John). Pervigilium Veneris: The Vigil of Venus, number 1 of 100 copies (Christopher Sandford's copy), Golden Cockerel Press, 1939.<br>£2,000 - 3,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. March 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Kelmscott Press. Keats (John). The Poems, one of 300, orig. vellum, 8vo, Kelmscott Press, 1894. £1,800 - 2,200
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Greenhill (Elizabeth).- Morison (Stanley) and Kenneth Day. The Typographic Book, 1450-1935, bound in dark green goatskin by Elizabeth Greenhill, 1963. £6,000 - 8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Fitzgerald (F. Scott). The Great Gatsby, first edition, first state dust-jacket, New York, 1925. £25,000 - 35,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. March 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Dionysius, <i>Halicarnassensis</i>. Antiquitates Romanae, Editio princeps, Treviso, Bernardinus Celerius, 24 or 25 February, 1480. £4,000 - 6,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Canon Law. [Laurentius Puldericus. Breviarum decreti], manuscript in Latin, on paper, [?Germany], [c. 1450].<br>£5,000 - 7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Swimming. Percey (William) The Compleat Swimmer: or, the Art of Swimming, first and only edition, by J.C. for Henry Fletcher, 1658. £5,000 - 7,000
    <b>Forum Auctions: Fine Books and Works on Paper. March 30, 2017</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Binding with silverwork by Anthony Nelme. The Holy Bible, containing the Old Testament and the New: : newly translated out of the original tongues, Oxford, John Baskett, 1716. £10,000 - 15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> George IV's copy. Nash (John, architect). The Royal Pavilion at Brighton, one of 10 copies, 1826. £8,000 - 10,000
    <b>Forum Auctions Mar. 30:</b> Blake (William, 1757-1827). "With Dreams upon my bed thou scarest me & affrightest me with Visions", 1825. £700 - 1,000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - May - 2004 Issue

ILLUSTRATED CALIFORNIA NEWS

Icn1

The Illustrated California News. Vol. 1., No. 1. September 1st, 1850


ILLUSTRATED CALIFORNIA NEWS PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY, AT THE OFFICE OF
The Alta California,
Washington street, Portsmouth Square.

Vol. 1, No. 1. September 1st, 1850.

TERMS—One dollar a number, with an allowance of 124 per cent, to purchasers of not less than 25 copies. Half yearly subscription, in advance, $10.00 ADVERTISEMENTS will be inserted at the usual rates.
Oculis Subjecta Fidelibus.

  CALIFORNIA is now the cynosure of every eye.— From the four quarters of the earth, regards are bent upon the land that almost realizes the tales of Eastern fiction, in wealth beneath, in adventure above, in vicissitudes of fortune, and almost magical rapidity of change. Amazement seems as yet to be a main ingredient in the feeling with which it is viewed; for the world is scarcely enough recovered from the excitement caused by the first recital of these marvels to look on them collectedly. Even now, notwithstanding the masses of correspondence, the libraries of volumes that have gone forth regarding it, men are all agape, as though it were yesterday's discovery; some swallowing every rumor with indiscriminate voracity; some confessing honestly that they know not what to think; a few affecting to listen with a half smile of incredulity, which they do not feel in their hearts; but all seizing with equal eagerness every fresh account that comes to hand. Tales of the diggings are sterling currency still, and welcome to all the world; like Cleopatra's beauty,
Age cannot wither them, nor custom stale
Their infinite variety.

Fresh bands of adventurers are pouring in, day by day, to this extraordinary country, all bound by promise of imparting the wonders of El Dorado to less adventurous friends and relatives; while the great majority, if we may judge by the size of the outward bound mails, would seem to be keeping that promise in its most liberal interpretation.

But the fame of California has been blazoned as yet by description only, which can convey, even when the work of the most practised pen, but a faint idea of what is sought to be portrayed. "The eye," says Horace, when exhorting play wrights to depend upon dramatic action rather than upon recital, for success—" the eye conveys a livelier impression than the ear." The roughest sketch of scenery gives a more faithful impression to the mind, and fixes it more strongly in the memory, than could be acquired from the unrivalled word-painting of even a Walter Scott. The views which meet the eye in every part of this noble country, are only known as yet by a few stray pencil drawings, the advantage of which is confined to those in whose immediate possession they may chance to be. For want of the auxiliary graver, they remain a sealed book to the public at large, which must either travel and observe for itself, or be content to remain in ignorance. It is therefore with the most sanguine hopes of success that we have entered upon this undertaking, in an attempt to supply one of the very few deficiencies which yet remain to meet;—an illustrated magazine, at a price within the reach of every class.

As may be readily supposed, this journal will be conducted on principles widely different from those which direct a daily press. Strictly speaking, it is not so much a news paper, as a periodical; not so much a vehicle for the importation of knowledge from abroad, as a faithful representative of the country which gave it birth; an exporter, rather than an importer, of events. We wish it to savor of California, and of California only; to be "of the earth, earthy;" being by no means cosmopolitans in journalism, but opining that, as a matter of good taste, every journal should be characteristic of the country to which it belongs. For each community has its own peculiarities and distinguishing features, which should be carefully reflected by its press; the stronger the tinge of local coloring, the more interest will be gained in the eyes of those who do not actually reside on the spot.

We have said that every journal should typify, so far as it is able, its own peculiar sphere of action; but with ourselves, who have double means of carrying out our own theory—being able to portray the material features of the country, as well as the moral features of its society, its tone and characteristic traits—exclusive attention to that point is more especially requisite. Our main object is picturesqueness, in composition as well as in illustration: for the pictorial portion of these pages being the most marked feature in the work, with it the letter-press is bound to harmonize. In the place of loading our columns with reprints from the States, or from European papers, nothing will be admitted which cannot reasonably be expected to command attention in foreign parts, to which it may be assumed that nearly every copy will ultimately find its way. For we entertain a hope, that, when bound into volumes, it may be considered a record of California; — a record in a double sense, not only of its history and phases of society, but of the material changes which are working in the face of the country itself. In a few years hence, when San Francisco, Sacramento, Stockton, and San Jose shall be goodly cities, boasting substantial buildings and architectural adornments, in place of adobe walls and lumber sheds, our pages may be again turned over with curiosity, by way of marking the difference between past and present,—of proving by ocular demonstration the unparalleled progressive instinct of the American people. It shall be as a Nilometer, to measure the increase of a mighty river. By the text, on the other hand, we hope to preserve a large mass of traditional history, which is even now fading into oblivion for want of a commemorative pen, while by chronicling the more important events as they pass, and separating them, so far as possible, from circumstances of merely local interest and party consideration, it may serve as a substitute for history, until that department of the State literature shall have been more efficiently filled.

Upon one point we desire to be distinctly understood. Although we shall carefully guard ourselves from taking a prominent part in political matters, more especially in such as are of a merely local nature, still we feel that the entire exclusion of them from consideration might argue a careless indifferentism, which would be almost an affront to the community for which we write. Systematically to reject the subject, confining ourselves to descriptions of locality and literary disquisitions, would throw a damp upon our pages, a flatness of effect, that no power of language, or refinement of style could overcome.— To use a homely, but expressive phrase, it would be offering "porridge without salt.".

Whenever we happen to believe ourselves capable of subjecting a broad question to the test of logical reasoning, not in the spirit of advocacy or partisanship, but in style of a judicial summing up;— whenever we see a chance of presenting the full strength of the argument on both sides to the judgment of the public, then, and then only, shall we suffer ourselves to speak.

With regard to party, we link ourselves with none, and interfere with none. Of course we cannot be without our own private political predilections; no man whose blood runs warm in his veins, who has a spark of social feeling or impressionable temperament about him, can venture to believe himself entirely free from party bias; we shall nevertheless make a point of suppressing it, inasmuch as that the expression of any such feeling not only intrudes upon the province of the daily press, but involves the chance of being drawn into controversy, a challenge which we shall resolutely decline to entertain. We shall endeavor to keep a straight forward course, casting off to the right and left, as irrelevant, every thing that does not directly tend to the advancement of the State.

Our claim to attention shall be based on the most rigidly punctilious regard to accuracy of fact.— Hackneyed as we are in public writing, swept along as we have often been in the full tide of the bitterest political controversy, we pride ourselves upon having never published a single line in the truth of which we did not religiously believe. There is no vain glory in the boast; any one can acquire a right to make the same, if he have only the will to win that right. We may be mistaken from time to time,— led astray by placing over-ready confidence in statements that we are unable to verify by personal experience; but will vouch for guarding as far as possible against every such mishap, by care in the selection of correspondents, and close comparison of opposite accounts. No monster gold stories, no ex parte statements, no crying up of one location at the expense of another, nothing but what shall have been first touched with the spear of Ithuriel, will ever fine place in these colum[n]s. Setting aside all higher considerations, we firmly believe that it is the ultimate interest of a public journal to keep this principle uppermost in view. In spite of the Hudibrastic warning, that
The world is naturally averse
To all the truth it sees and hears;
But swallows darkness, and a lie,
With greediness and gluttony;

we are still convinced that the confidence of the pubic is the first object to secure, and that the public will not be long in finding out where that confidence may be securely placed.

The last point to be touched upon, before winding up this inaugural profession of faith, is one to the importance of which we are sensibly alive. Every free country is estimated abroad by the tone of its own press, which is considered, not unreasonably, as holding up the mirror to society. "Bad the crow, bad the egg," says a Greek proverb, of immemorial antiquity; and wherever journalism is marked by violence, by recklessness, or by palpably interested motives in expression of opinions, the blame will be justly attached, not so much to itself, as to the community that supports it. Nor is this consideration, that it is not the sole sufferer by its own misdeeds, the only one to be kept in prominent view. "Upon the press of this country," observes the writer of a very remarkable article in the Marysville Herald, "rests a great responsibility. For good and evil it has a great power. The newspaper, therefore, should be more than a price current of the markets, a reporter of crimes and events, a chronicle of gold diggings, or a 'snapper up of unconsidered trifles.' It should be the book from which may be drawn instructions and incentives to those moral and social qualities, which will more than any thing else tend to elevate the scale of the affections, and give to society in California that character which can alone secure its permanency as a State." Let us therefore pledge ourselves—so far as ability may allow—to make common cause with our elder brethren of the craft in supporting the principles, and working out the precepts, so eloquently insisted on in the article from which we quote; in maintaining a high standard of writing, both as regards morality, dignity of expression, and abstinence from unnecessary personalities. And though it beho[o]ves us to be chary of engaging for performance, we may safely promise never to offend.

Let it not therefore be supposed that we intend to indulge in lecturing, or to be guilty of any such unwarrantable assumption. "Never moralize without spectacles," quoth Doricourt in the Belle's Stratagem, to a tiresome adviser, with more practical wisdom in a single phrase than the other could command in the length of a sermon. To be merry as well as wise :—
Polla men geloia ei-
pein, polla de spoudaia,
(why is there no Greek type to be had in California?) after the fashion of Aristophanes, who doubtless had his private reasons for the commixture of style which he adopted when addressing an Athenian audience— to back a word in season by a word in jest, is by no means the least effective preachment, after all. Like Master Shallow, "we have heard the chimes at midnight" in our time, and promise our heartiest thanks to any one who will enrich us with a characteristic anecdote, or racy witticism, "fire-new from the mint," or the mines, to lighten the dullness of our pages withal; barring Joe Millers, which are long since obsolete.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30: Printed & Manuscript African Americana</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Malcolm X, typed manuscripts for the <i>LA Herald Dispatch</i> column "God's Angry Men," 1957.<br>$200,000 to $300,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Frederick Douglass, Autograph Letter Signed to George Alfred Townsend, Washington, 1880.<br>$40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Carte-de-visite album featuring a previously unrecorded image of Harriet Tubman, 1860s.<br>$20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30: Printed & Manuscript African Americana</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Collection of documents from the Montgomery Improvement Association, Alabama, 1955-63. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Martin Luther King, Jr., working draft of the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," Alabama, 1963. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> <i>Benjamin Bannaker's Almanac</i> for 1795, Baltimore. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30: Printed & Manuscript African Americana</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Collection of 41 letters addressed to Rebecca Primus, 1854-72.<br>$20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Abby Fisher, <i>What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking</i>, first edition, San Francisco, 1881.<br>$10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Victor H. Green, <i>The Negro Motorist Green-Book for 1941</i>, New York, 1940. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar. 30:</b> Toni Morrison, <i>The Bluest Eye, </i>reviewer's copy, New York, 1971. $4,000 to $6,000.
  • <b>Now in press: 19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> <i>The First American Magna Carta. English Liberties.</i> Boston, 1721.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Babbage presentation to Peel, the man who killed the Difference Engine 1832
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Stamp Act. 1765
    <b>Now in press: 19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Central Park Photographs by Prevost 1862
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Salem Witch Trials. Wonders of the Invisible World 1693
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Mammoth print of Millie-Christine, "The Carolina Twins" c. 1868
  • <b>Auction Pierre Bergé & associés in association with Sotheby’s: Important Books and Manuscripts from the Library of Jean A. Bonna from the 15th to the 20th Century. Sale on April 26, 2017. Exhibition in London March 28-30</b>
    <b>Pierre Bergé & Associés, Apr. 26:</b> Galileo, <i>Discorsi e Dimostrazioni matematiche.</i> Leyde, Elzevier, 1638. Original edition: only known copy of the first state. €700,000 – 900,000
    <b>Pierre Bergé & Associés, Apr. 26:</b> Fables illustrated by Benjamin Rabier. Paris, Tallandier, without date [ca. 1910]. Superb binding doubled in vellum decorated with painted and mosaic decors by André Mare illustrating four fables. €10,000 – 15,000
    <b>Pierre Bergé & Associés, Apr. 26:</b> Gustave Flaubert, draft for the preface of the <i>Memoir for the defense of Madame Bovary</i>, 15-30 January 1857. Exceptiona signed autograph manuscript. €40,000 – 60,000
    <b>Auction Pierre Bergé & associés in association with Sotheby’s: Important Books and Manuscripts from the Library of Jean A. Bonna from the 15th to the 20th Century. Sale on April 26, 2017. Exhibition in London March 28-30</b>
    <b>Pierre Bergé & Associés, Apr. 26:</b> Boccace, <i>The Book of Praise and the Virtue of the Noble and Cleric Ladies.</i> Verard, 1493. First edition of the French version attributed to Laurent de Premierfait. €40,000 – 60,000
    <b>Pierre Bergé & Associés, Apr. 26:</b> Exceptional set of 15 original bindings by Jean de Gonet, on rare editions illustrated by Picasso, Matisse, Miro or original editions of Bataille or Radiguet.

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