• <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 14. Darwin, Charles. 1809-1882. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection... 1859.</i>. US$ 60,000-80,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 46. Smith, Adam. 1723-1790. <i>An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations.</i> US$ 70,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 224. CIVIL WAR. Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book of the War [1865-1866]. US$ 120,000-180,000.
    255 — add to caption: First Edition, Subscriber’s Copy
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 270. Serra, Junipero. 1713-1774, ET AL. Pangua, Francisco. Letter in Spanish, 1775. US$ 60,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 77. Apple 1 Motherboard, with label "Apple Computer 1 / Palo Alto. Ca. Copyright 1976." US$ 300,000-500,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 46. The 1934 Nobel Prize Medal for Physiology or Medicine. Presented to George Minot. US$ 200,000-300,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 39. Darwin, Charles. 1809-1882. Autograph Letter Signed ("Ch. Darwin"). US$ 70,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 4. Lubieniecki, Stanislaw. 1623-1675. <i>[Theatri Cometici pars posterior] Historia Cometarum...</i> US$ 25,000-35,000.
    <b>Bonhams September 21:</b> Lot 3. Vera rare George III mahogany and engraved brass orrery. US$ 200,000-250,000.
  • <b>Sotheby's Paris, De la bibliothèque Stéphane Mallarmé, 15 October.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 163. Stéphane Mallarmé. An autograph manuscript for <i>Un coup de Dés jamais n'abolira le Hasard</i>. [Avril Ou Début MAI 1897]. Est. 500,000-800,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 109. Manet, Edouard - Edgar Allan Poe - Stéphane Mallarmé. <i>Le Corbeau. The Raven. 1875</i>. Est 80,000-120,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 152. Edgar Degas. <i>Portrait of Stéphane Mallarmé and Auguste Renoir</i>, [16 Décembre 1895]. Est. 40,000-60,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 15. Baudelaire, Charles. <i>Les Fleurs du Mal. Paris, Poulet-Malassis et De Broise, 1861.</i> <br>Est. 80,000 - 120,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris, De la bibliothèque Stéphane Mallarmé, 15 October.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 137. Mallarmé, Stéphane. Vers Sur un Galet D'Honfleur. [Eté 1892 OU Été 1894.] Est. 5,000-8,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 48. Gide, André - Maurice Denis. <i>Le Voyage d'Urien. Paris, Librairie de L’Art indépendant, 1893.</i> Est. 20,000-30,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 103. Mallarmé, Stéphane - Edgar Allan Poe. Manuscripts Autographs. [1870-1875 ET 1869]. Est. 80,000-120,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 107. [Revue - Stéphane Mallarmé] La Derniere Mode. Gazette du monde et de la famille. Est. 40,000-60,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris, De la bibliothèque Stéphane Mallarmé, 15 October.</b>
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 110. Mallarmé, Stéphane - Edouard Manet. <i>L’après midi d'un Faune. Églogue. Paris, 1876.</i> Est. 30,000-50,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 160. Mallarmé, Stéphane. Premier état D'un Un Coup De Dés Jamais N'Abolira Le Hasard. Manuscrit Autographe. [1897].<br>Est. 60,000-80,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 164. Mallarmé, Stephane. 6 jeux d’épreuves Pour un Coup De Dés Jamais N'Abolira Le Hasard De l’édition définitive chez Vollard. Est. 100,000-150,000 EUR.
    <b>Sotheby's Paris</b>: Lot 198. [Méry Laurent] <i>Liber Amicorum De Méry Laurent</i>. 1875-Fin Des Années 1890]. Est. 50,000-80,000 EUR.
  • <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 52. Charles Schulz, Original Peanuts Snoopy Baseball Strip, U.S.A, 1964. Starting price $16,000.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 6.<br>Maurice Sendak (1928-2012), 'Max, Where the Wild Things Are', Pen & Ink, 2012. Starting price $1,500.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 13.<br>Leo Rijn after Dr. Seuss, Cowfish Maquette, U.S.A, 1998. Signed on stand. Starting price $1,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 17.<br>Dr. Seuss, Untitled, Color Pen & Ink, C. 1940. Signed ‘Dr Seuss’ lower left. Starting price $4,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 19.<br>Dr. Seuss, ‘I wonder how I offended George…’ Pen & Ink, C. 1930. Starting price $7,500.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 29.<br>Disney Studios, 'Queen, Snow White', Concept Sketch, U.S.A., C. 1937. Starting price $3,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 30.<br>Marc Davis, 'Sleeping Beauty in a Meadow', Production Cel, 1959. Signed. Starting price $1,200.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 50.<br>Charles Schulz, Original Peanuts Daily Strip, USA, 1966. Signed 'Schulz'. Starting price $10,000.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 58.<br>Chuck Jones, Signed, hand-painted Production Cels from Duck Dodgers, 1952. Starting price $4,500.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 77.<br>Stan Lee, Marvel Studios, Bishop,<br>X-Men, Production Cel, C.1995. <br>Starting price $240.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 79.<br>Warner Bros, 'New Adventures of Superman', C. 2000. Production Cel. Starting price $300.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Oct 14th:</b> Lot 84.<br>Tim Burton, Mayor from Nightmare Before Christmas, C. 1993. Starting price $1,500.00.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - November - 2013 Issue

How One Book Collector's Crusade Succeeded in Changing a Law


Part of the proposed statute stricken from the books.

Sometimes when you really believe in something, believe in it to the extent some might think it an obsession, you can achieve things few would have thought possible. This is the story of Richard Hopp, an unusual book collector from southern California, and his quest to protect book collectors and small-time sellers from the clenches of a law that legally could have turned them into participants in organized crime, simply for doing what collectors and small-time sellers do. Perhaps Richard Hopp was inspired by the great books in his quest to change California legislation, but it seems more like his guiding literary work was The Little Engine that Could.


Richard Hopp ran into the long arm of the law a few years ago when he was charged and convicted in Los Angeles under a statute designed to prevent the fencing of stolen goods. Some pawnbrokers and flea market sellers undoubtedly buy stolen goods off the street for pennies on the dollar and resell them for dimes. In the book field, the source of supply for such goods is often public libraries. Street people, perhaps feeding a drug habit, remove books from a library, sell them cheaply to an unscrupulous small-time seller, and repeat the process ad infinitum. The seller knows darn well the books are stolen, but is insulated from the crime by buying them “legally” before reselling.


The result is that many jurisdictions have enacted laws that apply to such small-time sellers, requiring licensing and such, and affording police the right to seize merchandise if they think there is reasonable cause to believe it may be stolen. Such regulation, while unfortunate in its adding burdens to legitimate merchants, is not an unreasonable demand to stem the enormous amount of fencing that enables a comparably large amount of theft to take place. It is the price of security. Prevent thieves from being able to resell stolen merchandise and you remove the incentive to steal it in the first place.


However, Mr. Hopp was not a merchant. The charges presented no evidence he ever sold a single book or made a dime. There was only evidence that he bought books, a charge of which every book collector on earth is guilty. Why was such a prosecution brought in the first place? Evidently, the authorities concluded that Mr. Hopp must be a dealer in books because of the way he purchased them. He would set up a buying, rather than selling booth at flea markets. He would advertise on places like Craig's List, seeking books. Authorities concluded he must be reselling books if he bought in bulk this way, though they never had a shred of evidence he made a sale. Mr. Hopp explained that he purchased this way for his own use, keeping those books he liked and giving away those he did not.


Obviously, authorities were confounded by this answer and refused to believe it. In some countries, people are convicted and sent off to gulags based on what the police think you are doing without a need for evidence. Fortunately, America is not such a country. When Mr. Hopp was convicted for not obtaining the proper license, the case was made on the technical reading of the statute, which required licensing of those in the “business of buying or selling books.” Surely the intent was to apply to those “buying and selling” books, not just one or the other, as no one was going after the well-heeled book collectors of Los Angeles and charging them for unlicensed book buying. Mr. Hopp was obviously targeted based on unproven assumptions.


On appeal, the conviction was thrown out. The appeals court said that regardless of the “or's” and “and's,” he was not engaged in a business, “business” requiring a profit motive and there was no evidence Mr. Hopp ever made a penny from his book buying “business.”


All of which brings us to legislation recently proposed in the State of California. It is designed to bring some statewide order to these issues, and, for the most part, Mr. Hopp is satisfied with the proposals. However, there was one section that set him off with the same tenacity he pursued his own case a few years ago. Mr. Hopp is not wanting for passion. It included a section that defined “criminal profiteering activity.” It was filled with what you might expect – murder, mayhem, arson, child pornography, robbery, pimping, extortion, felonious assault, human trafficking, and other gruesome crimes. Down at the end was a section that included “buying, selling, trading, accepting for sale on consignment, or auctioning secondhand tangible personal property.” Under the statute, actions by small-time secondhand sellers could become part of a “pattern of criminal profiteering activity,” and the behavior could be considered “organized crime.”


One can hear the agitation in Mr. Hopp's voice as he discusses the legislation. You might say no one would ever prosecute a small-time bookseller or collector as a member of “organized crime” for not correctly dotting every “i” in their licensing requirements, but then again, who would have thought anyone would ever prosecute someone for buying books?


Once again, Mr. Hopp was zealous in pursuing his beliefs. It didn't matter that this time the case no longer targeted him personally. He hired a lawyer anyway, repeatedly contacted state legislators, and made several appeals against the legislation. He did not feel he was gaining much respect from the legislators. It was not a pleasant process. Nonetheless, at the end of the day, the legislation was passed without the offending material. It was struck from the legislation. Small-time vendors and book collectors in California will not have to fear being carted off to prison for organized crime like some mafia don. It wasn't easy, but you can fight city hall. As Mr. Hopp commented, “I'll never be known for what I stopped, but everyone in the world would know if I didn't.” So rest easy, California book collectors. Mr. Hopp is looking out for you, even if you are completely unaware he exists.


Or, as Richard Hopp often concludes his messages, “Keep well.”

Posted On: 2013-11-01 17:18
User Name: unclebooks

Thank you Mr. Hopp, Thank you. I hope we all know your efforts have pushed back at the tide of "benevolence" that will inevitably consume us all in the guise of laws designed to "protect" us. We even applaud as our rights sail away. For now you have stopped a small part of the slide down the slippery slope.
Kudos to you, Micaela Pierce

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autograph letter signed by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to Senator John William Clark Watson, Richmond, 1865. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autograph poem by John Quincy Adams from an album kept by Abby Smith, w. inscription signed by her grandfather, John Adams, 1820s. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Typed letter signed by Theodore Roosevelt to assemblyman Michael A. Schapp, New York, 1913. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autograph letter signed by Richard Wagner to Hofkapellmeister Max Seifriz, Zürich, 1853. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Photograph signed and inscribed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to librettist Paul Collin, 1888. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> <i>Katalog der Wiener Kunstschau</i> signed and inscribed by Egon Schiele, 1916. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Autographs
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Letter signed by Mohandas K. Gandhi to Dr. John Haynes Holmes, Sevagram, 1940. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Photograph signed and inscribed by Marilyn Monroe to Dulce Brito, circa 1957. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Oct 22:</b> Two typed letters signed by William Faulkner, Los Angeles, 1943. $4,000 to $6,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> A patriot who fought with George Washington Superb Daguerreotype of Baltus<br>Stone at age 101 (1846).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Edward Curtis portrait of Honovi, Walpi Snake Priest "Honovi was one of the author's principal informants" (1910).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Execution of the Lincoln Assassination Conspirators by Alexander Gardner (1865).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Beecher, Henry Ward Beecher, and the other siblings with their father Lyman Beecher. By Mathew Brady (1850s).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> From Slaves to World-Famous Entertainers Millie-Christine, "The Two-Headed Nightingale" (c. 1868-71)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Goldfield, Nevada Photograph Collection Fabled Western Mining Boomtown (1905-1906)
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Tycoon-Collector Benjamin Richardson poses with his great-grandson as appeared in parade.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Alexander Gardner portrait of Lincoln the only known copy, ex-John Hay (1863).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Magnificent Niagara Falls album with a strong provenance (1867).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Spectacular American West Album From Yosemite to Salt Lake City to San Francisco.

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