• <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4: Printed & Manuscript Americana</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4:</b> The Bay Psalm Book, previously unseen 7th edition of the first book printed in North America, Boston, 1693. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4:</b><br><i>The Federalist: A Collection of Essays Written in Favour of the New Constitution</i>, first edition, two volumes, New York, 1788.<br>$90,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4:</b> Thomas Jefferson, <i>Notes on the State of Virginia</i>, first English edition, London, 1787. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4: Printed & Manuscript Americana</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4:</b> William Rollinson, <i>Alexander Hamilton, Major General...Secretary<br>of the Treasury</i>, engraving, New York, 1804. $5,000 to $7,500
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4:</b> <i>$100,000 Reward!</i>, letterpress broadside, Washington, 20 April 1865. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4:</b><br>John André, <i>A Representation of Major John André...going from the Vulture Sloop of War</i>, aquatint, circa 1781. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4: Printed & Manuscript Americana</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4:</b> Lewis Cresse, Manuscript journal of an early Cape May whaler, 1752-66. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4:</b> Letterbook of Boston merchant<br>and Privateer agent Paschal Smith during the Revolution, Boston<br>and elsewhere, 1775-81.<br>$20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 4:</b><br>A group of four Autograph Letters Signed to Che Guevara from his father and Alberto & Tomas<br>Granado, 1954-55. $4,000 to $6,000.
  • <b>Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts, February 14th, 2016.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 9. HIERONYMUS. C.340-420. <i>Epistolae. WITH: Lupus de Oliveto. Regula Monachorum ...</i> US$ 20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 47. FROST, A.B. 1858-1921. Shooting Pictures. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons.<br>US$ 10,000-15,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 53. PICASSO, PABLO, RAOUL HAUSMANN, et al. ILIAZD, ed. Poesie de mots inconnus. 1949. US$ 8,000-12,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 64. BRIGGS, HENRY. 1561-1630. <i>The North Part of America</i>. [London: 1625]. Engraved by R. Elstracke. US$ 8,000-12,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 79. COPERNICUS, NICOLAUS. De revolutionibus orbium coelestium. 1566. US$ 80,000-120,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 80. DARWIN, CHARLES. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of ... US$ 70,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 87. NEWTON, ISAAC, SIR. Autograph Manuscript in Latin and English [n.p., early 1670s}. US$ 100,000-150,000
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 93. Dr. Kary Mullis' 1993 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, awarded to him for the invention of the Polymerase Chain Reaction. US$ 450,000-550,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 96.<br>CLEMENS, SAMUEL. Autograph Manuscript, nearly complete chapter 30 of <i>A Tramp Abroad</i>, c.1879.<br>US$ 20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 105. GOLF. [MATHISON, THOMAS. d.1754.]<br><i>The Goff</i>. An Heroi-Comical Poem.<br>US$ 40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 113. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. <i>Ulysses</i>. First Edition, Presentation Copy, Signed and Inscribed by Joyce on the half-title. US$ 40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 120. LONDON, JACK. Autograph Manuscript of the short story "Flush of Gold". US$ 40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 135. STEINBECK, JOHN. Autograph Manuscript of an unpublished short story. US$ 35,000-45,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 149. GERONIMO. BARRETT, S.M., ed. Geronimo's Story of His Life. 1906. US$ 12,000-18,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 165.<br>ENOLA GAY. LEWIS, ROBERT A. An official pilot's log, 1942 to 1946.<br>US$ 50,000-80,000.
  • <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b><br>Lot 14. Blaeu,<i>Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula</i>, 1635. Est. $14000-$16000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b><br>Lot 305. Arrowsmith, <i>Texas: The Rise, Progress, and Prospects of the Republic of Texas</i>, 1841. Est. $18000-$20000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b><br>Lot 256. Thackara, <i>Plan of the City<br>of Washington in the Territory of Columbia</i>, 1792. Est. $13000-$16000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 188. Browne/Senex, A New<br>Map of Virginia Mary-land, 1719. <br>Est. $5500-$6500
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 47. Cellarius, <i>Scenographia Systematis Copernicani</i>, 1708.<br>Est. $2400-$3000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 6. Ortelius, <i>Typus Orbis Terrarum</i>, 1571. Est. $7000-$8500
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 413. De Medina, <i>Mundo Novo,</i> 1554. Est. $7000-$9000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 37. Jansson, <i>Histoire des Grands Chemins de l'Empire Romain</i>, 1736. Est. $3000-$3750
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 798. Le Rouge, <i>Atlas Nouveau Portatif a l'Usage des Militaires</i>, 1748. Est. $2400-$3000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 60. Munster, <i>Tabula Novarum Insularum</i>, 1559. Est. $5500-$7000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 122. Morden, <i>A New Map of the English Empire in America</i>, 1695. <br>Est. $14000-$16000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 291. J.J. Stoner, Niagara-Falls, <br>N.Y., 1882. Est. $1600-$1900
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 797. Sanson, <i>Die Gantze Erd-Kugel</i> ... Europa, Asia, Africa und America, 1679. Est. $8000-$10000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 799. Lotter/Lobeck, Atlas Geographicus Portatilis, 1760.<br>Est. $1600-$1900
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 808. Railroad Companies, [<i>Manuscript Railroad Atlas</i>], 1890.<br>Est. $1000-$1500
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 800. Pinkerton, <i>A Modern Atlas</i>, 1815. Est. $8000-$10000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - November - 2013 Issue

Free Speech in the Electronic World

B5eafa5e-5934-42ad-af7c-671dce9f3d15

Facebook's thumbs-up “Like” symbol.

The world of books and printed matter has been at the heart of America's First Amendment free speech rights as long as there has been a First Amendment. Those who have opposed the words that were written have often tried to shut down the presses, burn the books, imprison the writers. Censorship must be as old as writing. The First Amendment has been a bulwark in protecting Americans' free speech, and if on occasion we have been a bit too loose with our protections, particularly in areas such as “obscenity,” our protection of political speech has been strong. In many countries, disagreement with political leaders is quickly silenced.

 

However, times change, and now we are living in an electronic world. Millions of words are electronically “spoken” every few minutes if not seconds. Sadly, thoughts are often truncated in the electronic world, thoughtful essays replaced with a few words typed with little consideration arising between brain and fingers. Twitter, one of the most popular forms of communication today, limits its messages to 140 characters. If America's founders had been required to relay the Declaration of Independence to the people on Twitter, it would have read as follows: “When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with anoth...” It would not have had quite the same impact as the document they produced.

 

A free speech challenge recently arose from a campaign for Sheriff of Hampton County, Virginia. The amount of speech involved made even Twitter look like War and Peace. The original trial court and first appeals court must have thought the “speech” so trivial as to be irrelevant to First Amendment consideration. The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit disagreed. I don't know whether this exactly constitutes a landmark decision, but in the opinion of this writer, it was a correct one. It certainly protected the free speech rights of those with few words to say.

 

A suit was brought in Virginia by several employees of the Hampton County Sheriff, or to be more accurate, former employees of the Hampton County Sheriff. They were fired. There were, naturally enough, different explanations given as to why they were let go, but the important part of this case revolves around whether the free speech claim raised by the ex-employees, if true, was a legitimate constitutional grounds to contest their firing. Their claim was that they were fired for postings on Facebook. Their postings weren't even words. They were simply clicks on a Facebook “Like” button. What they liked was the Sheriff's election opponent. The Sheriff did not like what they did.

 

Facebook is something we need not describe. It is one of those rare electronic things that even old people recognize. The Court dutifully tells us “Facebook is an online social network where members develop web profiles to interact and share information with other members,” but you knew that. However, the former employees never wrote out their praises of the Sheriff's opponent, they simply clicked the thumbs-up “Like” button. It said they liked the Sheriff's opponent's web page, implying they liked the Sheriff's opponent too, likely more than they liked the Sheriff, their employer (or ex-employer) himself. After the election, they moved from status of employees to former employees, and they concluded their implied support of the Sheriff's opponent (who lost to the Sheriff) was the reason they lost their jobs.

 

The Court of Appeals ruled that expressing their approval of a political candidate by clicking his Facebook “Like” button constituted protected free speech within the meaning of the First Amendment. The Court wrote, “Once one understands the nature of what Carter did by liking the Campaign Page, it becomes apparent that his conduct qualifies as speech. On the most basic level, clicking on the “like” button literally causes to be published the statement that the User “likes” something, which is itself a substantive statement. In the context of a political campaign’s Facebook page, the meaning that the user approves of the candidacy whose page is being liked is unmistakable.” The Court then goes on to address the seemingly minor, non-speaking aspect of clicking a “Like” button by noting, “That a user may use a single mouse click to produce that message that he likes the page instead of typing the same message with several individual key strokes is of no constitutional significance.” The Court likened a Facebook “Like” to a political sign on your front lawn, already recognized by the Supreme Court as protected free speech.

 

Most free speech advocates will undoubtedly see this as an important, rather than trivial decision. I, for one, certainly “like” it.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 7. <br>W. Churchill, 'The Second World<br>War,' 6 Vols, 1st Edition, Signed.<br>Starting Bid $1,800.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 9. <br>Cormac McCarthy, The Border Trilogy, 1st Editions, Signed, 1992-98. <br>Starting Bid $1,600.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 26. <br>Sabre-Toothed Tiger Skull Cast. <br>Starting Bid $ 700.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 29. Ariosto, [Opere] Orlando furioso…, 2 Vols, Venice, 1730. Starting Bid $2,000.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 40. Goya, Complete "Los Caprichos," 5th Ed., Real Academia. Starting Bid $3,400.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 42.<br>Gustav Klimt, "50 Handzeichnungen," Leipzig, 1922. Starting Bid $1,800.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 43. Léon Bakst, 42 Tafeln und 6 Abbildungen, Berlin: Wasmuth, 1925. <br>Starting Bid $3,000.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 62. Portfolio Revue Verve, Vols. I-X, Nos. 1-38, 1937-60. Starting Bid $9,000.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 73. Ptloemas, Geographiae universae tum veteris, Peter Keschedt, 1597.<br>Starting Bid $280.00.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 76.<br>G. F. Kunz, "The Book of the Pearl," Inscribed, New York, 1908.<br>Starting price $280.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 81. NWA 8277 — Lunar Meteorite Slice, Sahara Desert. Starting Bid $1,600.
    <b>AUCTIONATA Feb 9th.</b> Lot 83. Benjamin Franklin; Sewel, The History of the Rise… Quakers, 1728. Starting Bid $2,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. <i>A superb collection of manuscripts signed by Lincoln and relics related to Lincoln’s death</i>. Washington, 1864-1865
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Rare Relic of the Underground Railroad (1857). <i>$500 Reward Ran away ...</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> CARTER, SUSANNAH. <i>The Frugal Housewife,</i> (1772) the second American cookbook, plates by Paul Revere.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> SCHIRRA, WALTER M.. Icon of the American Space Program. <i>A Complete Set of Schirra’s Flight Log Books (1947-69).</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> A fine pair of daguerreotypes, one a black nurse holding a white baby, the other the white parents. Maryland, c. 1853.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Internet. (COMPUTERS.) CERF, VINTON & KAHN, ROBERT. <i>"A Protocol for Packet Network Intercommunication" in IEEE Transactions on Communications.</i>

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