• <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b><br>Lot 14. Blaeu,<i>Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula</i>, 1635. Est. $14000-$16000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b><br>Lot 305. Arrowsmith, <i>Texas: The Rise, Progress, and Prospects of the Republic of Texas</i>, 1841. Est. $18000-$20000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b><br>Lot 256. Thackara, <i>Plan of the City<br>of Washington in the Territory of Columbia</i>, 1792. Est. $13000-$16000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 188. Browne/Senex, A New<br>Map of Virginia Mary-land, 1719. <br>Est. $5500-$6500
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 47. Cellarius, <i>Scenographia Systematis Copernicani</i>, 1708.<br>Est. $2400-$3000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 6. Ortelius, <i>Typus Orbis Terrarum</i>, 1571. Est. $7000-$8500
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 413. De Medina, <i>Mundo Novo,</i> 1554. Est. $7000-$9000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 37. Jansson, <i>Histoire des Grands Chemins de l'Empire Romain</i>, 1736. Est. $3000-$3750
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 798. Le Rouge, <i>Atlas Nouveau Portatif a l'Usage des Militaires</i>, 1748. Est. $2400-$3000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 60. Munster, <i>Tabula Novarum Insularum</i>, 1559. Est. $5500-$7000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 122. Morden, <i>A New Map of the English Empire in America</i>, 1695. <br>Est. $14000-$16000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 291. J.J. Stoner, Niagara-Falls, <br>N.Y., 1882. Est. $1600-$1900
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 797. Sanson, <i>Die Gantze Erd-Kugel</i> ... Europa, Asia, Africa und America, 1679. Est. $8000-$10000
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 799. Lotter/Lobeck, Atlas Geographicus Portatilis, 1760.<br>Est. $1600-$1900
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 808. Railroad Companies, [<i>Manuscript Railroad Atlas</i>], 1890.<br>Est. $1000-$1500
    <b>Old World Auctions (Feb 3-17):</b> <br>Lot 800. Pinkerton, <i>A Modern Atlas</i>, 1815. Est. $8000-$10000
  • <b>Cowan's Books and Maps: Timed Online Auction, Open, Bid Now!</b>
    <b>Cowan's Books and Maps: </b> Lot 30. <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn</i>, First Edition. Est $1000-$1500. BID NOW!
    <b>Cowan's Books and Maps: </b> Lot 46. Explorations for a Pacific Railroad Route, 13 Vols. EST $2,000-$3,000. BID NOW!
    <b>Cowan's Books and Maps: </b> Lot 47. <br>The Novels and Stories of Willa Cather, Autograph Edition. Nos 1-13.<br>EST $4,000-$6,000. BID NOW!
    <b>Cowan's Books and Maps: </b> Lot 14. <br><i>The Glory of New York by Joseph Pennell</i>, Bruce Rogers Design. <br>EST $1,000-$2,000. BID NOW!
    <b>Cowan's Books and Maps: Timed Online Auction, Open, Bid Now!</b>
    <b>Cowan's Books and Maps: </b> Lot 31. <i>Little Women</i>, First Edition. Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1868-1869.<br>Est $800-$1000. BID NOW!
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. <i>A superb collection of manuscripts signed by Lincoln and relics related to Lincoln’s death</i>. Washington, 1864-1865
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> Rare Relic of the Underground Railroad (1857). <i>$500 Reward Ran away ...</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> CARTER, SUSANNAH. <i>The Frugal Housewife,</i> (1772) the second American cookbook, plates by Paul Revere.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> SCHIRRA, WALTER M.. Icon of the American Space Program. <i>A Complete Set of Schirra’s Flight Log Books (1947-69).</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> A fine pair of daguerreotypes, one a black nurse holding a white baby, the other the white parents. Maryland, c. 1853.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> The Internet. (COMPUTERS.) CERF, VINTON & KAHN, ROBERT. <i>"A Protocol for Packet Network Intercommunication" in IEEE Transactions on Communications.</i>
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 25:<br>Art & Storytelling: Photographs<br>& Photobooks</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 25:</b> Marcus A. Root, "<i>General Tom Thumb</i>" with parents, daguerreotype, circa 1846. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 25:</b> William Saunders, <i>Sketches of Chinese Life and Character</i>, album with 50 hand-colored photographs, 1871-72. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 25:</b> Wilson A. Bentley, album of 25 microphotographs from glass<br>plate negatives, 1888-1927.<br>$20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 25:<br>Art & Storytelling: Photographs<br>& Photobooks</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 25:</b> Hilla & Bernhard Becher, <i>Anonyme Skulpturen, Eine Typologie technischer Bauten</i>, first edition inscribed, Düsseldorf, 1970. $1,200 to $1,800.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 25:</b> Edward Ruscha, four seminal artist's books in original dust jackets.<br>$1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 25:</b> Typological set of more than 100 photographs of WWII fighter planes, 1942-45. $400 to $600.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 25:</b><br>Roy DeCarava and Langston Hughes, <i>The Sweet Flypaper of Life</i>, first edition signed by authors, New York, 1955. $500 to $750.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - August - 2013 Issue

In The News: They Are Still Making New Manuscripts, But Not Old Books

Typow

The latest in word processing technology.

Perhaps the saddest thing about computers, email and the like, is what it means for the old documents generations have preserved, studied, and collected. We aren't making them any more. No one writes letters now, except maybe a few old or very well-mannered younger people. We send an email. It's fast and cheap. And, if that's not fast enough, we send a text message or an instant message. Or, we can post a message on Facebook if we need to reach a lot of friends. Facebook has replaced those cumbersome photocopied letters people used to send out at Christmas. Letters now can be transmitted instantaneously around the world for free, allowing for quick response. It's almost like talking on the telephone (something people do not use telephones for any longer – just ask your children).

Some of these forms, notably emails, and Facebook postings (often to our chagrin) can be preserved in their electronic format for a long time. However, even these are unlikely to be permanent. Someday you will delete the old ones, or your hard drive will crash and erase them. Facebook postings will eventually be deleted after we are gone. And even if they aren't deleted, these messages are not collectible. You can't hold them in your hands, put them on the shelf, admire them. They are at best like electronic books – useful from the standpoint of practicality, useless in terms of collectibility.

So, why would anyone ever return to the old method of putting messages on paper when all aspects of convenience favor electronic letters? Maybe there is a reason after all. We may have to thank Edward Snowden for this, even if he is a man with few friends these days. His revelation of the amount of electronic eavesdropping and digging into people's personal records has begun to make people nervous about their electronic records. Big Brother may be watching after all. It just took about 30 years longer than George Orwell imagined.

The news out of Russia is interesting, even if not quite a trend. It was reported that Russia's Federal Guard Service (FSO), charged with protecting the secrecy of Kremlin documents, has placed an order with a German company for 20 typewriters. Typewriters! Who knew they even made them anymore? An FSO source reportedly told Russian newspaper Izvestia that after all the reports of leaks of electronic documents, including Snowden's and the earlier Wikileaks, they have come to see the value in paper documents. Naturally, they cannot be intercepted by some hacker thousands of miles away. If one does escape somehow, it can be traced, because unlike digital copies, all of which are identical, typewriters leave their individual finger, or ink, prints. The guilty party more readily can be traced.

This is not to predict a massive return to paper documents. The world moves forward, not back. However, it will be good for future generations if at least some of our important documents are put to paper. Then, one hundred years from now, collectors will be able to find something with which to remember our generation too, not just earlier ones.

A couple of other stories in the news remind us of an old adage about old books (or was that real estate?) - they aren't making them any more. Newer books may become old, but today's old books are finite in number, and that number can (and will) only get smaller.

In Calgary, Alberta, Canada, major flooding of the Bow and Elbow Rivers earlier this summer inundated much of the downtown area. Thousands of people were forced to evacuate their homes. According to the Calgary Sun, one of the victims was Tom Williams Books, being located in a basement shop on 17th Avenue S.E. Most of some 200,000 volumes were reportedly destroyed. While most would likely fall into the category of used books, some were antiquarian, collectible titles. For each, that is one fewer copy remaining in existence.

From Gloucester in England, another 6,000 books were extensively damaged or destroyed in a fire in a storage room that police have attributed to arson. Again, fortunately, not too many were highly valuable books, with the owner, a bookseller, estimating the best had a value around $1,000. As in Calgary, the business will have to be closed, or at a minimum continued in a much reduced state. A suspect has been arrested. Slowly, though intractably, the supply declines.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts, February 14th, 2016.</b>
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 9. HIERONYMUS. C.340-420. <i>Epistolae. WITH: Lupus de Oliveto. Regula Monachorum ...</i> US$ 20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 47. FROST, A.B. 1858-1921. Shooting Pictures. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons.<br>US$ 10,000-15,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 53. PICASSO, PABLO, RAOUL HAUSMANN, et al. ILIAZD, ed. Poesie de mots inconnus. 1949. US$ 8,000-12,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 64. BRIGGS, HENRY. 1561-1630. <i>The North Part of America</i>. [London: 1625]. Engraved by R. Elstracke. US$ 8,000-12,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 79. COPERNICUS, NICOLAUS. De revolutionibus orbium coelestium. 1566. US$ 80,000-120,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 80. DARWIN, CHARLES. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of ... US$ 70,000-90,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 87. NEWTON, ISAAC, SIR. Autograph Manuscript in Latin and English [n.p., early 1670s}. US$ 100,000-150,000
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 93. Dr. Kary Mullis' 1993 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, awarded to him for the invention of the Polymerase Chain Reaction. US$ 450,000-550,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 96.<br>CLEMENS, SAMUEL. Autograph Manuscript, nearly complete chapter 30 of <i>A Tramp Abroad</i>, c.1879.<br>US$ 20,000-30,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 105. GOLF. [MATHISON, THOMAS. d.1754.]<br><i>The Goff</i>. An Heroi-Comical Poem.<br>US$ 40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 113. JOYCE, JAMES. 1882-1941. <i>Ulysses</i>. First Edition, Presentation Copy, Signed and Inscribed by Joyce on the half-title. US$ 40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 120. LONDON, JACK. Autograph Manuscript of the short story "Flush of Gold". US$ 40,000-60,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 135. STEINBECK, JOHN. Autograph Manuscript of an unpublished short story. US$ 35,000-45,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 149. GERONIMO. BARRETT, S.M., ed. Geronimo's Story of His Life. 1906. US$ 12,000-18,000.
    <b>Bonhams Feb 14th:</b> Lot 165.<br>ENOLA GAY. LEWIS, ROBERT A. An official pilot's log, 1942 to 1946.<br>US$ 50,000-80,000.

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