• Christie's: The first four Folios of William Shakespeare’s collected works will be auctioned on 25 May.
    Christie's: The first four Folios of William Shakespeare’s collected works will be auctioned on 25 May.
  • <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 1. Silver coin (1455), celebrating expulsion of English people in 1451.<br>Est: € 12,000-20,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 7. Heures à l’usage de Coutances. Paris, last quarter of 15th century. Est: € 30,000-40,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 9.<br>TERENCE. Lyon, Jean Trechsel, 1493. Est: € 20,000-30,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 8. Biblia latina. Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 1478. Est: € 20,000-30,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 11. [Francesco Colonna]. Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. Venise, Alde Manuce, December 1499. Est: € 150,000-200,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 14. Marco<br>Vigerio della Rovere. Decachordum christianum. Fano, Girolamo Socino, 1507. Est: € 15,000-20,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 18. CONSTANTIN VII. De notevoli et utilissimi ammæstramenti dell’agricoltura. Venise, Gabriele Giolito de Ferrari, 1542. Est: € 40,000-50,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 19. TITE-LIVE. Latinæ historiæ principis. Lyon, Sébastien Gryphe, 1548.<br>Est: € 15,000-20,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 38. OTTOMAN CORAN. 17th century by Muhammad Hafiz (Imam Mehmed Effendi).<br>Est: € 20,000-30,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 45. Blaise PASCAL. Pensées. Paris, Guillaume Desprez, 1670. Est: € 100,000-120,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 52. George EDWARDS. A Natural History of uncommon birds. London, the author, 1743-1751. Est: € 20,000-30,000
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 59. Jean de LA FONTAINE. Fables choisies. Paris, Desaint & Saillant, Durand, 1755-1759. Est: € 40,000-50,000.
  • <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 10.<br>Caxton (William, printer). Polycronicon, 53 leaves, after<br>July 1482. £10,000-£15,000
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 15. Cookery recipes. C17th/18th manuscript, 127pp., recipes include "To make Rasberry Creame" & "To make the Oxford Ginger Bread". £2,000-£3,000
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 32. Churchill (Winston S.) The Second World War, 2 vol. (of 6), signed and inscribed, 1950-51. £1,000-£1,500
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 34. "Lewis Carroll". The Nursery "Alice", with 7 autograph notes & letters, inscribed. 1891. £25,000-£35,000
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 39. Childers (Erskine) The Riddle of the Sands, first edition, in morocco binding, 1903. £700-£900.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 42. Ono (Yoko) and John Lennon. Grapefruit, signed by Lennon & Yoko Ono, 1971. £700-£900.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 58. Rodchenko (Alexander) Krasnaia Armiia [Red Army], 1938. <br>£1,800-£2,200.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 66. Henning (Veit Balthasar) Perpetual Almanac, 1750. £2,000-£3,000.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 73. Gillray (James) Dido in Despair, original hand-coloured caricature, 1802. £1,500-£2,000.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 94. Norris (Herbert) A good group of mostly Shakespearean and Elizabethan C20th costumes. £1,200-£1,800.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 106. Beardsley (Aubrey, illustrator) The Cambridge A.B.C., June 1894.<br>£1,000-£1,500.
    <b>Bloomsbury May 25:</b> Lot 133. Perry (Charles) A View of the Levant, George IV's copy, the Beckford Rosebery copy, 1743. £5,000-£7,000.
  • <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 23/24.</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Mary Stuart. Ms. Parliament document (contemp. copy). 1567. <br>Est: € 2.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Latin and French Book of Hours. About 1480. Est: € 65.000.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Book of Hours by Germain Hardouyn. 1533. Est: € 18.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> G. P. Gallucci, Theatrum mundi. 1588. Est: € 5.000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 23/24.</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> J. Hill, The vegetable system. 1761-75. Est: € 60.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>J. Honter, Rudimentorum cosmographicorum libri III. 1549.<br>Est: € 3.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Two terrestrial and celestial globes by J. G. Doppelmayr. 1789 or later. Est: € 40.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>G. de Maupassant, Contes choisies. 1891-92. Est: € 6.000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 23/24.</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>K. Schwitters, HahnePeter. 1924.<br>Est: € 6.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>I. G. Chernikhov, Arkhitekturnye fantazii. 1933. Est: € 3.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>E. Baj, La Cravate. 1972. Est: € 3.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>H. Bellmer & G. Bataille, Histoire de l'oeil. 1944. Est: € 3.000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - August - 2013 Issue

Comic-Con:  it's no laughing matter

Screen shot 2013-07-31 at 12.18.24 pm

Comic-Con San Diego

Is it that time of year again?  Yup.  The festival of printed cartoons ran July 18th to July 21st in San Diego as in past years.  It’s close enough to Hollywood to attract real life cartoon characters and close enough to the Mexican border to reach the drug stores one may need to recover.  The event is organized by Comic-Con International, “a non-profit educational corporation dedicated to creating awareness of, and appreciation for, comics and related popular art.”  Thank God somebody has their back.  Mickey, Pluto and Superman are safe after all.  The fair manages to attract 100,000 visitors over 4 days and also manages not to be the only fair of its kind in the United States.  Chicago, Miami, Boston and Denver [among others] have their events.  Comics are no laughing matter.

Comic Con San Diego has been around for a while and I spoke with two San Francisco comic book store principals who have had long associations with the event, in both cases most of ten years.  James Sime of Isotope Comics didn’t go last year because of a death in the family [his cat] and didn’t go again this year to see if he could continue his addiction recovery.  “The show is a little much,” the crowds milling like the bulls at Pamplona.
  

Natalie Jumper who is a partner with Gary Buechler and Anthony Rivera in Comic Outpost [www.comicoutpost.com] were there and had a new attraction this year, video interviews with some of the real comic book characters; Dan Jurgens who wrote the Superman comics for a while, Gerry Duggan who writes Deadpool for Marble, Cody Vrosh, a free lance artist and Darick Robertson who draws the art for the smash comic title Ballistic.  England may have its royal family but so does the comic book world complete with capes, uniforms and disguises.

If none of this sounds familiar that’s okay.  Comics have become their own language and have their own blue bloods.  [Does this sounds like a new comic book title to anyone else?]

I asked Natalie what its like to be in the comics business.  They mainly sell new material to about 500 people visiting their shop on Ocean Avenue each week.  A typical transaction runs from $20 to $80 and she describes the business as very good.

For an east coast perspective I then called George Vasilakos at Zombie Planet in Albany, New York to see if they had sent anyone to the show.  Not this year and not in ten years since he moved east.  He does however take the family to the New York Comic-con for three days in the November each year.  “I wouldn't miss it.”  George, who has had his shop for 10 years and an active comic book business for five, said business is good, several hundred fans and collectors coming in each week.
  

For George the New York show is a family affair.  Mom and their three children 18, 16 and 10 will all be going with him for three days.  “I’m the obsessed collector but my children also collect.  They have been attracted by the images and become interested in the stories.”

I then spoke with Tom Key, a lifelong collector, who works at Oxford Comics in Atlanta, Georgia.  Tom is 46.  He didn't attend the recent Comic-con show either but expects to go to the Dragon-con in Atlanta in September.  Comics are a big part of his life.  “New comics are typically released once a month and, working here, I get an early look and sometimes buy.”  To the question, “is it an investment” he replied he hasn't bought comics with that expectation.  As to his collection, “I have them stored.  If I could I would look at them electronically.”  Condition is very important.  He has about 2,000 examples in his collection.

About the field generally – “Comics aren’t as taboo as they once were as movie studios have made superheroes a part of everyday life.”  As to women, “comics continue to be a man’s game.  The heroes are action figures, male power figures.”  He then mentioned “manga,” Japanese comics that many women prefer.

Rare Book Monthly

  • Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts, 8 June 2016, New York
    Bonhams June 8: ARISTOTLE.<br>384-322 B.C.E. De animalibus <br>US$ 300,000-500,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. Iconic signed Darwin photograph "I like this photograph much better than any other which ..."
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>Autograph Letter Signed</i>. Early Unpublished Darwin letter on the races of man.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> WRIGHT, WILBUR. Experiments and Observations in Soaring Flight. Journal of the Western Society of Engineers 8, no. 4 (August, 1903).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. Signed and dated Oxford 1931.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> GARDNER, ALEXANDER. Antietam Bridge, Maryland. "One of the memorable spots in the history of the war."

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