• Christie's: The first four Folios of William Shakespeare’s collected works will be auctioned on 25 May.
    Christie's: The first four Folios of William Shakespeare’s collected works will be auctioned on 25 May.
  • <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 1. Silver coin (1455), celebrating expulsion of English people in 1451.<br>Est: € 12,000-20,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 7. Heures à l’usage de Coutances. Paris, last quarter of 15th century. Est: € 30,000-40,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 9.<br>TERENCE. Lyon, Jean Trechsel, 1493. Est: € 20,000-30,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 8. Biblia latina. Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 1478. Est: € 20,000-30,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 11. [Francesco Colonna]. Hypnerotomachia Poliphili. Venise, Alde Manuce, December 1499. Est: € 150,000-200,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 14. Marco<br>Vigerio della Rovere. Decachordum christianum. Fano, Girolamo Socino, 1507. Est: € 15,000-20,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 18. CONSTANTIN VII. De notevoli et utilissimi ammæstramenti dell’agricoltura. Venise, Gabriele Giolito de Ferrari, 1542. Est: € 40,000-50,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 19. TITE-LIVE. Latinæ historiæ principis. Lyon, Sébastien Gryphe, 1548.<br>Est: € 15,000-20,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 38. OTTOMAN CORAN. 17th century by Muhammad Hafiz (Imam Mehmed Effendi).<br>Est: € 20,000-30,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 45. Blaise PASCAL. Pensées. Paris, Guillaume Desprez, 1670. Est: € 100,000-120,000.
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 52. George EDWARDS. A Natural History of uncommon birds. London, the author, 1743-1751. Est: € 20,000-30,000
    <b>ALDE May 24:</b> Lot 59. Jean de LA FONTAINE. Fables choisies. Paris, Desaint & Saillant, Durand, 1755-1759. Est: € 40,000-50,000.
  • Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 18. Blaeu, <i>Nova et Accuratissima Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula</i>, 1660.<br>Est. $14000-$17000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 20. Pitt, <i>Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula</i>, 1680. Est. $9500-$11000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 65. Ortelius, <i>Americae sive Novi Orbis, Nova Descriptio</i>, 1571. <br>Est. $6000-$7000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 84. Bailleul, <i>L'Amerique Divisee en Ses Principales Parties</i>, 1752.<br>Est. $19000-$22000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 99. Sayer & Bennett, <i>The American Military Pocket Atlas</i>, 1776. <br>Est. $10000-$12000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 269. Reid, <i>Plan of the City of Washington in the Territory of Columbia</i>, 1796. <br>Est. $2750-$3500
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 291. Carleton, <i>Map of Massachusetts Proper</i>, 1801. Est. $12000-$14000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 378. Keulen, <i>Pas Kaart vande Noord Oost Kust van Cuba en d'Oost Kust van Florida</i>, 1695. Est. $3250-$4000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 651. Ptolemy/Fries, <i>Tabula Superioris Indiae & Tartariae Maioris</i>, 1541.<br>Est. $3000-$4000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 688. Wit, <i>Nova Africa Descriptio</i>, 1660.<br>Est. $2750-$3500
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 706. Ortelius, <i>Maris Pacifici</i>, 1589.<br>Est. $8000-$9000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 727. Audubon, <i>Least Stormy-Petrel</i>, 1836. Est. $1400-$1700
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 741. Bordone, <i>Isolario</i>, 1547.<br>Est. $16000-$19000
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 747. Teesdale, <i>A New General Atlas of the World</i>, 1835. Est. $2000-$2750
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 752. Colton, <i>Colton's Atlas of the World Volume I and II</i>, 1856.<br>Est. $2500-$3250
    Old World Auctions (May 4): Lot 760. Prevost, <i>Histoire Generale des Voyages ... Tome Quatorzieme</i>, 1757. <br>Est. $2400-$3000
  • <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 23/24.</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Mary Stuart. Ms. Parliament document (contemp. copy). 1567. <br>Est: € 2.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Latin and French Book of Hours. About 1480. Est: € 65.000.
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Book of Hours by Germain Hardouyn. 1533. Est: € 18.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> G. P. Gallucci, Theatrum mundi. 1588. Est: € 5.000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 23/24.</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> J. Hill, The vegetable system. 1761-75. Est: € 60.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>J. Honter, Rudimentorum cosmographicorum libri III. 1549.<br>Est: € 3.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> Two terrestrial and celestial globes by J. G. Doppelmayr. 1789 or later. Est: € 40.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>G. de Maupassant, Contes choisies. 1891-92. Est: € 6.000
    <b>Ketterer Kunst Hamburg, Rare Books Auction on May 23/24.</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>K. Schwitters, HahnePeter. 1924.<br>Est: € 6.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>I. G. Chernikhov, Arkhitekturnye fantazii. 1933. Est: € 3.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>E. Baj, La Cravate. 1972. Est: € 3.000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, May Auction:</b> <br>H. Bellmer & G. Bataille, Histoire de l'oeil. 1944. Est: € 3.000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - January - 2012 Issue

Internet Giants Amazon and eBay in a Tax War

Ebaysaleschart

A graph presented by eBay intended to show that it is large retailers, not sales taxes, that hurt.

Two internet behemoths, and two of the largest booksellers in the world, went at it in testimony before the House Judiciary Committee recently. The subject was the collection of out of state sales tax by internet retailers. And here is the surprising thing – each was focused not on their own business interests, but on those of you, the small bookseller or other merchant. You may have found them at times heavy handed and too quick to raise their fees, but on this issue, they are both fighting for you. Oddly, though, they reach totally different conclusions as to what is in your best interests. Those conclusions are as different as are their own personal interests. It's funny how things happen that way.

The issue is whether an online business must collect sales tax on items sold to out of state customers. Right now, the U.S. Constitution, as interpreted by the Supreme Court, says that a state can only require an out of state retailer to collect sales tax from customers within their state if that retailer has some connection to that state, like a store or warehouse located within its boundaries. However, that court has implied that if the federal government passed a law allowing states to demand out of state retailers collect a state's sales tax, regardless of whether they had any presence, then they could be forced to to do so. Naturally, most states would love to have the federal government pass such a law, as they could collect a lot more sales tax money that way. Many consumers probably disagree.

However, we will leave aside the interests of government and consumers, and instead, as Amazon and eBay did in their testimony, focus on the interests of booksellers and other retailers, big and small. Amazon came out strongly for a federal law requiring internet retailers to collect state sales taxes, counterintuitive to their long stonewalling of sales tax collection. Ebay came out just as strongly opposed.

Amazon's position is the more surprising. In his testimony, Amazon's Vice-President for Global Public Policy, Paul Misener, stated that the internet retailer has long supported such federal rules, and that may be the case. However, as states in the past have tried to get Amazon to collect their sales tax, no company has been more adamant in its refusal. The company has closed warehouses in Texas, let go “agents” in other states when those states asserted those were sufficient connections to force Amazon to collect their sales tax. In Tennessee, it demanded the state promise not to find a connection before it agreed to open warehouses and hire workers in that state. In California, up until a few weeks ago, Amazon threatened to put an initiative on the ballot to prevent state officials from requiring sales tax collections on out of state retailers on the basis of such connections. No one has played hardball like Amazon on this issue, so why are they now asking Congress to pass a law that would require them to collect sales tax?

Before attempting to answer this question, let's look at what Amazon said. Mr. Misener stated that passing such legislation would serve the purposes of “protecting states’ rights, addressing the states’ needs, and leveling the playing field for all sellers.” On that last concern, Mr. Misener repeated the argument that so-called “Main Street” retailers have been arguing for years – that they are at a disadvantage to online sellers because they must charge their customers sales tax while the online retailers do not. Tax-free prices are cheaper than taxed ones, hence a competitive advantage. “Fairness among sellers should be created and maintained. Sellers should compete on a level playing field,” Mr. Misener asserted. Then he added, “Congress should not exempt too many sellers from collection, for these sellers will obtain a lasting un-level playing field versus Main Street and other retailers.”

So, going back to the question why Amazon is doing this, many “Main Street” shops might be dubious of their motives. Main Street booksellers have long complained that Amazon was the epitome of the unlevel playing field, using their size and lack of overhead by not having a physical presence on Main Street to undercut and eventually drive them out of business. There has long been the refrain that Amazon, in effect, uses their stores as a showroom. Customers come in to look at the merchandise on Main Street, make their selection, and then go home and order the merchandise for less from Amazon.

Well, not to be suspicious, but behind Amazon's words, they may now see their self-interest coinciding with that of “Main Street” retailers. Amazon has opened up distribution centers in several states to reduce their costs, and they wish to open them in more. They have what may (or may not) be considered “agents” willing to support their site in every state. Meanwhile, the states are pursuing them more aggressively than ever before. Just a few weeks back, Amazon threw in the towel in its dispute with California and agreed to begin collecting California sales tax next September. California has Amazon's largest customer base, and they want to be able to open warehouses close to their customers. The changing situation is forcing Amazon to collect sales taxes in more and more locations, in effect putting them at a competitive disadvantage to smaller internet retailers with a location in just one state. They are starting to feel the pain “Main Street” merchants have felt for years.


Posted On: 2012-01-01 00:00
User Name: George5133

As far as BUYING/SAVING $ and EBAY goes, forget the stock and use the website.

Use a site like Ebuyersedge.com to set up saved searches. You


Posted On: 2012-01-01 00:00
User Name: PhilipCohen

What possible purpose can a 300 character limitation on comments serve? You could add an extra nought. ...


Posted On: 2012-01-02 00:00
User Name: xcergy

Excellent article. Thanks for posting.


Posted On: 2012-01-02 00:00
User Name: PeterReynolds

I'm not an American, and find the idea of going into a shop and paying more than the advertised price insulting and from a Briton's point of


Posted On: 2012-01-02 00:00
User Name: PeterReynolds

We only do that kind of thing in businesses aimed at selling to other businesses, who can offset the tax against taxes collected on their ow


Posted On: 2012-01-02 00:00
User Name: PeterReynolds

What might benefit America as a whole is if they exempted all businesses with less than $150,000 sales from charging sales tax. Think of al


Posted On: 2012-01-07 00:00
User Name: PhilipCohen

Most interesting article. But, still no comments of any consequence. Is no one else visiting this site, or is it simply that detailed negative


Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5: Autographs</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Anne & Margot Frank's copy of <i>Grimm's Fairy Tales</i>, in which Anne wrote her own and Margot's name, circa 1940. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Albert Einstein, group of 4 letters Signed to Helmut L. Bradt regarding Bradt's emigration to the U.S., one bearing Nazi censor ink stamps, 1939-40. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Archive of items from Ludwig Bemelmans to producer Mary K. Frank, concerning <i>The Street <br>Where the Heart Lies</i>, 1959-62. <br>$10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5: Autographs</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Archive of correspondence to<br>Edwin A. Van Valkenburg from President Theodore Roosevelt and members of his family, 1913-21. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Oscar Wilde, manuscript notes panning a book on book collecting, circa 1886. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b><br>John Hancock, partly-printed document Signed as Governor of Massachusetts, Boston, 1781.<br>$4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5: Autographs</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Franz Liszt, Autograph Letter<br>Signed to Carl Gille, Rome, 1869. $4,00 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b> Joseph Conrad, photograph Signed and dated, 1918. $1,000 to $2,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 5:</b><br>Two Guns White Calf, photograph postcard Signed with his pictogram, 1929. $800 to $1,200.
  • Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts, 8 June 2016, New York
    Bonhams June 8: ARISTOTLE.<br>384-322 B.C.E. De animalibus <br>US$ 300,000-500,000.
  • <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. Iconic signed Darwin photograph "I like this photograph much better than any other which ..."
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. <i>Autograph Letter Signed</i>. Early Unpublished Darwin letter on the races of man.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> WRIGHT, WILBUR. Experiments and Observations in Soaring Flight. Journal of the Western Society of Engineers 8, no. 4 (August, 1903).
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. Signed and dated Oxford 1931.
    <b>19th Century Shop.</b> GARDNER, ALEXANDER. Antietam Bridge, Maryland. "One of the memorable spots in the history of the war."

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